Acrobat Accessibility – "Tagged Annotations Failed" Master Page URL from InDesign Causing Error

Explorer ,
Oct 15, 2019 Oct 15, 2019

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I have a Master Page footer with a URL in InDesign. When exported, the URL is a clickable hyperlink.

 

Screen Shot 2019-10-15 at 5.24.35 PM.png

 

But when I run an Accessibility check in Acrobat, all footer instances on all pages fail "tagged annotations."

Screen Shot 2019-10-15 at 5.24.19 PM.png

 

The footer URL is not tagged in the Tags view. In the Content view, it exists as a "Link" under Annotations and as a Container <Artifact>.

Screen Shot 2019-10-15 at 10.29.11 PM.png

How do I fix this?

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Adobe Employee ,
Oct 16, 2019 Oct 16, 2019

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Hi,

You can fix the issue by making annotations as artifact in Content panel or include in the Tags tree. For further info related to failure,  Right Click on "Element 1" and Select Explain. If it still can't fix the issue, I would request you to provide us a file so that we can help you with more accurate information.

 

Thanks

Rachit

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Explorer ,
Oct 16, 2019 Oct 16, 2019

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I was able to fix this by going Tags > Find… > Unmarked Annotations and Acrobat created all the Link - OBJR tags necessary.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 16, 2019 Oct 16, 2019

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coopjack wrote: "I was able to fix this by going Tags > Find… > Unmarked Annotations and Acrobat created all the Link - OBJR tags necessary."

 

That is one technique to correct hyperlinks that are missing the OBJR sub-tag.

 

However, although your PDF now passes the Acrobat checker, it still is not accessible per the PDF/UA-1 and WCAG accessibility standards. These apply to your document:

  • 7.8 -- Page headers and footers: Running headers and footers shall be identified as Pagination artifacts, and
  • Avoid redundency. That is, the same information repeated multiple times, such as headers and footers, logos that appear on every page, and the same hyperlink on each page.

 

Software accessibility checkers like the one in Acrobat Pro and by other manufacturers, can't check and test for about 1/3 of the accessibility requirements. They require a human with knowledge of accessibility standards to determine if the file is fully accessible.

 

In your design, even with the footer artifacted, the hyperlink will be caught by some assistive technologies and be voiced on each page over and over, possibly in the middle of a sentence as text flows from one page to the next.

 

In my 508 InDesign classes, I call this a Catch-22 trap: If you leave a live hyperlink but it doesn't have the OBJR sub-tag, then it fails most accessibility checkers. But if you correct that and add the OBJR sub-tag, now you have a redundency error as well as live, tagged header/footer information that should be artifacted.

 

Here are some ways to get your design out of this Catch 22 dilemma:

 

  1. Easiest: don't put hyperlinks in repeating page headers and footers. Instead, put hyperlinks in the live body content of your document.
  2. If you must put a hyperlink in a header of footer (such as you have a client who requires this), then remove the hyperlink in InDesign and in the PDF. It won't be clickable for anyone (whether they use assistive technology or not), but the design will pass accessibility tests.

 

The best solution is to design a document that avoids and prevents the problem from the beginning. And that's why we're called "designers"!

 

Hope this helps.

 

Bevi Chagnon | Designer & Technologist for Accessible InDesign + PDFs |
Books & Classes | PubCom

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New Here ,
Feb 26, 2021 Feb 26, 2021

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Hello,

 

I am working on an annual report of 160 pages and trying to make it also accessible. 

 

In this document we have main navigation at footer, with links to different sections so they are hyperlinks that refers to certain pages in the document. And it is located in the master page at InDesign document. At least me and my clients find this navigation very useful and user-friendly in this large pdf documetn. But at the Acrobat accessibility full check I get 1345 elements showing failure in tagged annotations... (Some pages have main menu & sub menu).

 

Is this a lost case or is there any solutions for this kind of problem? I think removing this “footer navigation menu” is not an option. It would break my heart to remove the menu from master page and put it on the 158 (or so) pages...

 

Best regards

Paula Venäläinen

Graphic Designer

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 26, 2021 Feb 26, 2021

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@PaulaVenalainen, headers and footers are deliberately not read by assistive technologies for significant reasons: they 1) are repetitive information, which is not allowed per our accessibility standards, and 2) they can break up the reading order when main content flows from one page to the next: where would you have the footer come into the reading order? In mid-sentence? Mid-paragraph?

 

Therefore, accessibility standards require all footers and headers be artifacted (except for maybe the first instance). Assistive technologies give their users a way to announce what page they are on.

 

Your design doesn't coordinate with this accessibility requirement. As described above, when a hyperlink is artifacted (so that it doesn't repeat for assistive technologies), it becomes an annotation error.

 

If your PDF has bookmarks (which it should because it's longer than 10 pages), wouldn't that give users the same functionality as a complex navigation system in the footer? Base the bookmarks on the different levels of headings and they can have nested sub-sections.

  1. An InDesign TOC can automatically generate bookmarks in the exported PDF.
  2. You can also manually add InDesign bookmarks that will be exported to the PDF, too.

 

See https://helpx.adobe.com/ca/indesign/using/bookmarks.html#create_bookmarks_for_pdf

 

Bevi Chagnon | Designer & Technologist for Accessible InDesign + PDFs |
Books & Classes | PubCom

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New Here ,
Mar 02, 2021 Mar 02, 2021

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Thank you for your swift answer, you have excellent points!


I will suggest that we should make an own version of this document for the assistive technologies.

And of course I have a TOC too. Actually we have 4 pages of bookmarked TOCs here, located at the the start of every section (that footer navigation goes to these TOC pages so user can navigate forward from there). All those TOCs have at least two levels of headings too.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 03, 2021 Mar 03, 2021

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You're very welcome.

And best to you and this project!

 

Bevi Chagnon | Designer & Technologist for Accessible InDesign + PDFs |
Books & Classes | PubCom

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