Highlighted

How can I retain the high resolution of images saved in a PDF?

New Here ,
Sep 20, 2013

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I'm using the trial version of Acrobat XI. The images are 1440dpi but always save ate 120dpi. The PDF is for the content of a picture book so I need to be able to save them at a minimum of 300dpi. Any help would be very much appreciated.

I found out that this is the best course of action:

Print the document (Word or any other original document) as an Adobe PDF file before adding any images.

Then, open the newly generated PDF file in Adobe PRO or similar PDF editing program.

In the editing program, import the images from your computer to their proper places in the document.

(In Adobe Pro, choose "edit PDF" and then "Add images".)

These images, if high-resolution, will retain their high resolution.

Topics

Create PDFs, Windows

Views

29.6K

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more

How can I retain the high resolution of images saved in a PDF?

New Here ,
Sep 20, 2013

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I'm using the trial version of Acrobat XI. The images are 1440dpi but always save ate 120dpi. The PDF is for the content of a picture book so I need to be able to save them at a minimum of 300dpi. Any help would be very much appreciated.

I found out that this is the best course of action:

Print the document (Word or any other original document) as an Adobe PDF file before adding any images.

Then, open the newly generated PDF file in Adobe PRO or similar PDF editing program.

In the editing program, import the images from your computer to their proper places in the document.

(In Adobe Pro, choose "edit PDF" and then "Add images".)

These images, if high-resolution, will retain their high resolution.

Topics

Create PDFs, Windows

Views

29.6K

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
LEGEND ,
Sep 20, 2013

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Something to try -

In Acrobat's preferences select "Convert to PDF". Select the incoming image format. Use the "Edit" button to play with the configuration options.

As well, consider giving any Distiller job options in use a look-see. Look over the configuration  for "Images".

Be well...

Likes

1 Like

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
New Here ,
Sep 20, 2013

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Many thanks for your reply CtDave

Unfortunately I can't find anything useful in Preferences >Convert to PDF >JPEG >Edit Settings

There are settings in Distiller that look more useful, but it appears that before they can be applied the Acrobat file has to be saved. It seems possible that it needs to be saved as a PostScript file and then converted to a PDF in Distiller, but this doesn't make any difference the way that I've (probably wrongly!) done this

.. I've changed the image in Acrobat and saved the file as .ps, but when I open the .ps file in Distiller with the new settings (Downsample Color Images: Bicubic Downsampling to 1400 pixels per inch for imahes above 1400 pixels per inch) and convert it to .pdf I find that the image is still reduced to 120dpi

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
LEGEND ,
Sep 20, 2013

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

If you are printing to the Adobe PDF printer or using Distiller, select the job settings of either print or press. They will save graphics at a higher resolution. The default for color images in the Standard settings is 150 dpi. Press and Print default at 300 dpi. You can change there settings to a new settings file and increase the resolution if you desire.

Likes

1 Like

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
New Here ,
Sep 23, 2013

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thank you for your reply.

I've tried Print to Adobe PDF with both High Quality Print and Press Quality in Properties but I keep getting the same result.I measured the new resolution as 120dpi (quite possibly incorrectly) by copying the image into Paint, saving it and checking the Details in Properties.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
New Here ,
Sep 24, 2013

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I finally produced the result that I needed with the help of Test Screen Name who pointed me in the direction of Preflight profiles:

I created my file in Word, saved it as a PDF (3.72MB), replaced the images with the original files (Word had made them tiny), then used the Digital Printing (Color) profile to Analyze & Fix the PDF, thus creating a PDF (98MB) that was suitable to upload. There is no doubt a more succinct and less Heath Robinson method but I wasn't able to find it!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Most Valuable Participant ,
Sep 24, 2013

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I think I maybe know why Word is making them tiny.

Suppose you have your a 144 dpi image that is 10 cm high. Now suppose you change the resolution to 1440 dpi. This must reduce the image size to 1 cm high.

So if you did that and placed in Word, it will show the "correct" size (i.e. 1 cm high). You can always scale images once in Word.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
New Here ,
Sep 24, 2013

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thank you again for all your help. I was beginning to think yesterday that I'd have to give up!

Word is not scaling other images that I've tested in this way so I think your answer is correct.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
New Here ,
Mar 19, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I found out that this is the best course of action:

Print the document (Word or any other original document) as an Adobe PDF file before adding any images.

Then, open the newly generated PDF file in Adobe PRO or similar PDF editing program.

In the editing program, import the images from your computer to their proper places in the document.

(In Adobe Pro, choose "edit PDF" and then "Add images".)

These images, if high-resolution, will retain their high resolution.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
AnandSri LATEST
Adobe Employee ,
Apr 12, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hello Anssir,

Thank you for sharing the workaround and solution which will be helpful to other users.

Feel free to update this discussion for any further assistance.

Regards,

Anand Sri.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Resources
One Stop Solution for Acrobat
Edit a PDF
Add a group