Times New Roman Bold, I have Photoshop, do I have a sub-license to incorporate TNR BOLD in Merch?

New Here ,
Apr 28, 2022 Apr 28, 2022

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I have Adobe Photoshop Desktop Program. I would like to incorperate Times New Roman in my creation of a Logo for merchandising purposes. In reading the Adobe site I found this which seems to indicate that the answer is YES...

Can I use the fonts to create a logo or other images?

Yes. You can use the fonts in any desktop program (such as Adobe Photoshop) to create images or vector artwork, which you can then use for any purpose. This includes generating a PDF, EPS file, or bitmapped file such as a JPEG or PNG.

 

 

however  I've seen older posts saying that Times new Roman has NEVER been a part of the Adobe Fonts library? On my Photoshop Program, Times New Roman and Times New Roman Bold ARE included and I can use them.

 

Was Times New Roman and Times New Roman Bold added to Photoshop recently? I just purchased Adobe Photoshop in the last 12 months. 

 

 

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Adobe Employee ,
May 12, 2022 May 12, 2022

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Hi there,

 

Thanks for reaching out. I'd like to inform you that "Times New Roman" and "Times New Roman Bold" are included in the system font, which we don't offer.

 

Thanks for your patience.

 

Regards,

Tarun

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Explorer ,
Jun 01, 2022 Jun 01, 2022

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The official answer: you need to see which specific version of Times New Roman is installed on your computer, and then check the software licence for those font files. Those software licences probably say that you can’t use Times for commercial merchandise. The Times New Roman on your computer was most likely installed as part of the operating system, not as part of any Adobe application.

 

The unofficial answer: practically every computer in the world comes with some form of the Times New Roman typeface installed. Because Times is so ubiquitous, most people assume that they can use Times however they want. And they do.

 

The history: the Times New Roman typeface was originally designed by commission in 1929–1932 by Monotype for the Times of London, for use on the newspaper’s Linotype typesetting machines. Those licences and trademarks are still the property of Monotype today. Apple licensed Times Roman for use on their Macintosh computers; Microsoft did the same with Times New Roman for Windows.

 

The reason why Times is so widespread today is that it was one of the very first typefaces to be converted into digital format. Adobe’s original technology – the PostScript language – is the basis of most digital typefaces today. PostScript was built into some of the first laser printers in the mid-1980s, along with what are called the original ‘PostScript 13’ fonts:

 

• Courier (regular, oblique, bold, and bold oblique);
• Helvetica (regular, oblique, bold, and bold oblique);
• Times (regular, italic, bold, and bold italic);
• Symbol

 

Once Apple and Microsoft added support for Times directly into their operating systems, everyone simply assumed that Times could be used however they wanted. But Monotype may beg to differ. And as the trademark holder of Times New Roman, the law is on Monotype’s side.

 

If you want to design merchandise that you’ll be selling for profit – and you want to respect Monotype’s legal rights – you have two choices:

 

• License one of Monotype’s many versions of Times directly from the company;
• Choose another typeface that you think is a good replacement for Times in your designs, but is available on Adobe Fonts.

 

Monotype has a wide variety of different Times fonts available for licensing. Because the original was designed for different sizes in metal, there are different versions to choose from:

 

Times Eighteen (for display-size text: 18 points and larger)
https://www.fonts.com/font/linotype/times-eighteen

 

Times New Roman (the classic: 12–17 points)
https://www.fonts.com/font/monotype/times-new-roman

 

Times (the classic: 11–14 points)
https://www.fonts.com/font/linotype/times

 

Times Ten (body text: 8–10 points)
https://www.fonts.com/font/linotype/times-ten

 

Times New Roman Seven (caption text: 6–7½ points)
https://www.fonts.com/font/monotype/times-new-roman-seven

 

Times New Roman Small Text (body text: 3½–5½ points)
https://www.fonts.com/font/monotype/times-new-roman-small-text

 

My recommendation: if you use a typeface available on Adobe Fonts, then you have clear, consistent licensing terms about what you can and cannot do. Plus there a wide selection of typefaces to choose from, and they’re all included with your Creative Cloud subscription. Here’s the webpage explaining how you can use typefaces available on Adobe Fonts:

 

https://helpx.adobe.com/fonts/using/font-licensing.html

 

I hope that answers your question. If not, please let me know.

 

Best regards

ANDREW KEITH STRAUSS / ACTP / CTT+ / ACI / ACE

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