What happens on 1st January when Adobe Fonts are no longer allowed to be used on client websites

Community Beginner ,
Nov 19, 2019

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Up until 31st December it has been OK to use Adobe Fonts on client websites as part of a CC subscription (according to the license), but as of 1st January, what will happen to fonts which have not yet been removed, or changed on client websites?

 

Furthermore, I see that you can still use web fonts in an HTML email or newsletter, or in a banner advertisement. How, in essence is allowing web fonts in an HTML email any different to using in a website? There is potential for more views in an email newsletter than on a website, so seems a bit harsh to continue to allow use in HTML emails and banner ads when website use is being discontinued (without the client subscribing to CC).

 

Also, just wondering if anyone receieved communication from Adobe regarding this change in Adobe Fonts licensing? I don't recall seeing anything, nor can I find anything in my email archives.

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What happens on 1st January when Adobe Fonts are no longer allowed to be used on client websites

Community Beginner ,
Nov 19, 2019

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Up until 31st December it has been OK to use Adobe Fonts on client websites as part of a CC subscription (according to the license), but as of 1st January, what will happen to fonts which have not yet been removed, or changed on client websites?

 

Furthermore, I see that you can still use web fonts in an HTML email or newsletter, or in a banner advertisement. How, in essence is allowing web fonts in an HTML email any different to using in a website? There is potential for more views in an email newsletter than on a website, so seems a bit harsh to continue to allow use in HTML emails and banner ads when website use is being discontinued (without the client subscribing to CC).

 

Also, just wondering if anyone receieved communication from Adobe regarding this change in Adobe Fonts licensing? I don't recall seeing anything, nor can I find anything in my email archives.

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Nov 19, 2019 0
New Here ,
Nov 19, 2019

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I would also like clarification on this - the T&Cs state 'if you are an agency' - I am a freelancer and would like to use Adobe fonts on a new client site (and have also used Adobe fonts on previous client sites that are still active). How do I advise my client on licenses? And is this a blanket policy that applies to everyone charging for a website build? I haven't had any communication relating to this from Adobe and it doesn't seem like there's a great deal of information on the Adobe CC website, considering it will affect a large number of subscribers. Is there a policy, or explanation, beyond the T&Cs?

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Nov 19, 2019 1
Community Beginner ,
Nov 20, 2019

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I have just spent some time (over an hour in total) speaking to an advisor at Adobe about this situation and even he (and his supervisor) say that it is not clear what will happen to existing sites which use an Adobe Fonts Web Project.

 

This is a typical scenario for us…

  • You design a website in Adobe XD, InDesign, Illustrator or Photoshop using Adobe Fonts.
  • Website design gets approved by client.
  • Website build begins (built using hand-coded HTML, WordPress, or any other CMS), you create an Adobe Fonts Web Project to use the same fonts specified in the design, and use the generated Web Project HTML code in the <head> of your website. At no point during the creation of the Adobe Fonts “Web Project” are you asked for any identifiable information like a domain name that the Web Project code will be used on.
  • Adobe’s Font Licensing states the following… The Terms of Use permit agency reselling, until December 31, 2019. After that time, your client would need their own Creative Cloud subscription to use for the web font hosting.
  • However it is OK to continue to use an Adobe Fonts Web Project on your own (agency) website, as long as you have a currently active Creative Cloud subscription.
  • My question to Adobe Support was… Will the Adobe Fonts used in a Web Project on a client website stop working on 1st January and revert to the fallback fonts specified in the CSS font stack? If they do stop working and revert to fallback fonts, how does Adobe know that the Web Project is used on a client website and not your own (agency) website since there is no identifying information as to where the Web Project is used?

 

I have been told that since it is not clear, this has been escalated to a senior support representative and I will receive a call back tomorrow between 8am and 8pm (GMT) to explain the situation fully.

 

I have also been told separately in a live chat session that “the website should work fine, but just to confirm, please give us 24 hours so that we can check and give you confirmation” (see below screen grab of live chat).

 

Once I hear back from Adobe, I will update here.

 

2019-11-20_11-54-55.png

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Nov 20, 2019 0
New Here ,
Dec 15, 2019

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did you get any clarification? I have hundreds of sites in the same situation. 

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Dec 15, 2019 0
Community Beginner ,
Dec 16, 2019

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Hey Tony,

I’d love to be able to tell you that I did get clarification, but not really. See below. I received a couple of replies from @AdobeFonts on Twitter…

Me: Hi @AdobeFonts, @AdobeUK, @Adobe I really need an answer to my question on the Adobe Support Community regarding what happens to client websites which have Adobe Fonts embedded using my CC account after 31st December 2019?

AdobeFonts: If the client websites are not moved to their own Creative Cloud subscription, the account will be in violation of the terms of use and may have the web font serving turned off. In that case, the web fonts will no longer be available to your websites. Any site using the web fonts will display the fallback fonts specified in your font stack or your browser’s defaults. Hope it helps.

Me: I then asked…

OK. In that case I have to ask how you are going to determine whether the site is a client site, or whether it is one of my sites (which would be able to legitimately use Adobe Fonts)?

Adobe Fonts: Following up with customers on web project use will be handled a case by case basis, but we may, for example, ask you to confirm that the projects you have published are for your own websites. The FAQ item on this topic has recently been expanded in response to customer feedback. The change was posted to the Terms of Use and required a click-through approval by all Adobe Fonts customers on sign in as of 15 October 2018.

The last sentence is the one that really bugs me, as we all know that when you are presented with a click through box when you sign-in, it is very rare that you would read through all the terms. Something as major as this should have been communicated via the Creative Cloud in-app notifications, as well as an email explaining the changes, not by hiding these rather important changes in an update to terms of use.

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Dec 16, 2019 0
New Here ,
Dec 16, 2019

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Hi Craig

Thank you. 

 

You would think for something that is as crucial as this there would be a clear outline. 

 

Also, are they expecting clients who have no use for any of the other adobe products to pay for a subscription of $19 per months?

 

Adobe needs to respond clearly to this.

 

 

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Dec 16, 2019 0
Community Beginner ,
Dec 16, 2019

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Hi Tony,

I agree, Adobe should have been more upfront about this change.

Yes, the general concensus from them was that if you host fonts for clients websites via your CC account, your client should then subscribe to the lowest available CC package (photography is the cheapest I think) and then you can transfer the Web Project over to their account. I have one client who already had their own CC account, so I was able to contact @AdobeFonts on Twitter and get them to transfer the Web Project over, which worked fine.

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Dec 16, 2019 0