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What effects are being used in this video?

Community Beginner ,
Jun 17, 2021 Jun 17, 2021

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Hi Community,

 

I'm intrigued to know what effects are being used in this video? From what I can guess to acheive that look would be to crank up the motion blur between key frames, and have the camera shake on every movement for the added impact. Would the fighers have needed some masking? I'm not so sure. Once I have an idea, I'll know what tutorials to look for.

 

I was also wondering if you can achieve the same thing on Premiere Pro and if it is easier to do so?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 17, 2021 Jun 17, 2021

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Could be as easy as using a directional blur. Can't see any real motion blur in there. If at all, it probably would be more of a Blur MoCurves effect from Sapphire, but even that would likely not work this well with such highly accelerated footage because there is simply no genuine motion to analyse. That's also why CC Force Motion Blur or Timewarp/ Motion Blur as well as RevisionFX' RSMB wouldnt do much. You really have to duplicate the layers, du a bit of crude masking and then animate the intensity and length of conventional directional blurs.

 

Mylenium

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 18, 2021 Jun 18, 2021

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Step 1, split the footage into layers to create your jumps in time. You could do this in Premiere Pro or just use After Effects and drag the footage into a new comp, then select the first cut point, then Shift + Ctrl/Cmnd + d to split the layer. Then move forward just a few frames to cover the part of the action that you want to slow down. You might want to create some overlap so you can do a transparency fade. Repeat until you have cut the footage up and created your jumps in time. Then, one at a time, pre-compose the layers you want to slow down moving all attributes to the new composition and trimming the pre-comps to the length of the layers. 

 

Now it's time to start adding the slow-motion effects. Each of the pre-composed layers you want to retime (slow down) should be time remapped. Alt/Option + Ctrl/Cmnd + T will give you a time keyframe at the beginning and end of each of the nested comps. You can drag the last keyframe to the right to slow down the layer. Fix the out points and slide the other footage along until you have completed the sequence of normal speed - jump in time to slow motion - normal speed - jump in time to slow motion, normal time. The goal is to get the timing and the cuts the way you want. 

 

When that is done, pre-compose everything or nest the comp in another comp so you can apply the blur, shake, and distortion effects on a single layer instead of trying to time everything. 

 

The choice of effects is yours. Directional Blur, position keyframes, scale keyframes, maybe Turbulent displace, and/or some other effects would be all you would need. You could do this with an adjustment layer instead of pre-composing, but I think the Pre-comp is a better idea because it also gives you more options for manipulating time. 

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