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what major should i study

Community Beginner ,
May 06, 2021 May 06, 2021

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hey! im so close to finish high school, and i've been practicing After Effects for 2 years, i love vfx but sometimes i find it hard, but for animeting keyframes/ graphs im a beast! i aslo lately started to discover blender(c4d alternative) and 3d elements (after effects plug in) so idk what i shoud major in.. 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 06, 2021 May 06, 2021

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Old man advice: Get out of the media industry while you can - unless you really, really specialize in something and are extremely good at it. Soon enough AI algorithms will edit news clips and other mundane stuff will be even further automated than it already is. Likewise, in the graphics industry things have evolved to a point where you could end up being a template creator for life and never do any "real" work. Not sure if I would want that. Point in case: You will have to practice your skills at such a high level these days, only a few "cream of the crop" people will ever have a decent career in this industry anymore. It was difficult before, but when a "It's good enough for YouTube" prevails in the industry, there's probably not much point getting into it in the first place. So for what it's worth, whatever you major in likely won't matter unless it's bolstered by a level of excellence where you could do things in your sleep and as per your own words, you're not slaying it (yet).

 

Mylenium

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Community Beginner ,
May 07, 2021 May 07, 2021

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you're right, but i didn't understand the 'media industry', you mean the television and companies? but that's what an editor do right? you edit videos that are meant to be shared. Also, i'd be honored to show you my recent project i made (only practicing element 3d ) and i think idk  you might have a clearer  vision of what kind of editor i am. thank you for your advise, that's really sweet. especially from an experienced man.. lots of love!

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 06, 2021 May 06, 2021

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More advice from another "old man."

 

In the late 1970s through the early 1990s, any technician in the movie business with a good set of technical skills could make a really good living because everything we did was extremely technical and took a great deal of patience and practice. If you missed exposure on a shot in 1995 by 1/4 of a stop the shot may be ruined.

 

From about 1993 to about 1998, if you had any computer skills and a decent eye you could make a really good living with your computer as a technician. Then it all started to go downhill. There were rotoscope artists that made a really good middle-class income removing wires from greenscreen shots. I have a good friend that owned a pretty substantial effects production company that worked on digital effects for a major blockbuster movie in 1995-1996. The producers gave him and his team 3 months to work on about 20 seconds of the movie. That whole company closed a few years later because it became impractical to have an office and staff to just work with the software. Just being a technician in the visual effects business is a losing battle. I heard a talk at NAB just a few years ago where the head of a major studio actually said about subcontracting visual effects work "If I don't put a visual effects house out of business I am not doing my job."  In the early days of Photoshop, you could charge a lot of money to simply remove the background from an image. Now you can send them out online and get the background removed for less than a dollar per image in under 4 hours. There's no money and no future in being a digital technician.

 

But there is hope. Really talented people, people that understand color, composition, music, literature, psychology, and have the kind of personality it takes to really think about, create, and deliver a really good product will always be able to find a way to make a really good living. Learning the software is by far the easiest part of that process. Unfortunately, you have to completely relearn the software every few years because it changes that often. The basics don't change, but the tools do, and they change all the time. 

 

My advice is to concentrate on literature, history, art, and try and figure out what inspires people. What brings out emotions. What makes people want to be better human beings. You might need to throw in a few courses on animation or visual effects or photography, but that is the least important part of your education.

 

You should also consider a minor in Business. Maybe even major in business, so you understand how money works. I know a lot of really talented people that have done really great work for some of the biggest clients in the world that are completely broke all the time because they never learned how to run a business or manage their money. No matter what you do, save at least 5% of every dollar you earn at your craft and invest it in your future. 

 

You can do all or some of that in college. You can do all or most of that on your own if you have that kind of personality. A degree, especially a degree in animation or photography or film, is not nearly as important as the last amazing thing you created on your own. A bachelor's degree in film or animation probably won't get you your first job, but an inspired demo reel will. Most of all, learn to manage your time so that you are always on time with your projects and hopefully under budget. That's the most important thing any creative person can be. On-time and under budget.

 

I hope this helps.

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Community Beginner ,
May 07, 2021 May 07, 2021

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wow. im speechless,  the "I know a lot of really talented people that have done really great work for some of the biggest clients in the world that are completely broke all the time because they never learned how to run a business or manage their money. No matter what you do, save at least 5% of every dollar you earn at your craft and invest it in your future."

i really do worry about my future financial status, and me not knowing how to manage might end my career, that's why i choose to go to college, learning editing softwares and techniques doesn't impress me as much as the community in college i can learn how to work this out, but i need to choose a major that is still relevant after 10 years, lots of people told me that cgi and vfx are the future and as i said it in my topic, i like to edit vfx and modeling/ animating 3d objects, at the same time, i don't want to take this huge risk and choose a film maker major, but i don't know what are the options, i have the creativity and passion but i don't know how to make it valid by choosing this decision, i feel like im running out of time... 

 

Also that's a little clip/ commercial i recently made to let you have a clearer vision about what i like, if you don't mind of course.. thank you so much 🙂 

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