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Adding Color to High Movement Scenes

New Here ,
Apr 05, 2020

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I googled and googled and googled for help and I'm hoping someone here can guide me in the right direction. I have no experience in After Effects so I'm learning things as I go, but my question is whether or not there is a less stress-free way to manually color the video besides manually painting every frame. The clips are all pretty high movement, some objects move more than others in some, so I can't just paint over each clip and be done. 

 

I apologize if this has been asked on the forums, I tried looking up what I've been searching for and couldn't find anything. 

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Adding Color to High Movement Scenes

New Here ,
Apr 05, 2020

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I googled and googled and googled for help and I'm hoping someone here can guide me in the right direction. I have no experience in After Effects so I'm learning things as I go, but my question is whether or not there is a less stress-free way to manually color the video besides manually painting every frame. The clips are all pretty high movement, some objects move more than others in some, so I can't just paint over each clip and be done. 

 

I apologize if this has been asked on the forums, I tried looking up what I've been searching for and couldn't find anything. 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 05, 2020

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The most efficient workflow always depends on the shot. There are lots of ways to isolate various elements in a scene, create mattes, sample colors, and make drastic changes. By far the easiest thing to do to a shot would be to duplicate the layer, add Gaussian Blur to the top copy, add Colorama to the top copy, then try some of the presets while trying various blend modes, opacity settings, and blur settings. Throw Sharpen and Find Edges on an adjustment layer and something like this took me about a minute:

Screenshot_2020-04-05 19.00.05_8CDM9J.png

You can see everything that I did to every layer. 

 

Because you are new I strongly suggest that you spend two or three hours at least with the User Guide tutorials so you know how the UI works. You'll waste a lot more time than that trying to figure out how AE works on your own. Editing and Visual effects require training, but you can get in a lot of trouble in ae if you don't do your homework.

AE-PPro.png 

 

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New Here ,
Apr 19, 2020

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So I watched the tutorials and didn't find what I was looking for. I'm not specifically looking for coloring the whole piece or a scene blue for example. I want to make some of the lights or reflections like pink or red or something like that as if they were red or pink. 

 

The only thing I could think of is like using the pen tool and doing some sort of tracking. I colored the whole project the color I wanted it to be, but I change the colors of some things. I don't know if this is making sense. If you need the project the video I can show you. What makes it hard is the level of movement changes in each scene, sometimes it's low, sometimes it's fairly high.

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New Here ,
Apr 27, 2020

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My problem still isn't solved. I don't know if this will bump my topic or if that's allowed, but I still I need help.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 28, 2020

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There are at least dozens of ways to use a copy of your footage as a source for a track matte. I am currently working on a film where I need to make the background behind dozens of holes in a bamboo fence darker. It would be nearly impossible to do with masks or by painting every frame, so I am using a copy of the footage to generate a black and white copy of the footage that I can use as a track matte for an adjustment layer. I still have to hand rotoscope the actors in front of the fence in most shots, but at least I'm getting the mask created by using a fist full of color correction effects to lighten the background while darkening everything else.

 

Show us a screenshot of a sample video and we might be able to point you to an efficient solution. Take these two shots from Adobe Stock.

500_F_308712578_ix1EQ0TSF555Usl2xt2wbX781StMViQ3500_F_327695416_DsdOEGM6t0hbWPCkztV5OMz3Gd0xlQHp

Changing the color of the lights in the concert footage is a completely different workflow than changing the color of the kid's shirt in the wheat field.

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New Here ,
Apr 28, 2020

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Here's the first frame. Lemme know if you need more. I can send the first clip in full if you want it. The huge change I've already done, but I want the lights to be pink, and yellow in some others. I tried doing some tracking, but I don't know where I was going wrong. I don't know if I need to do several tracking points or how complex it's gonna get. Especially going further into the piece of work.

 

Screenshot (10).png

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 29, 2020

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So what is going on in that shot? Is it a pan, a handheld camera, a zoom? Using a copy of that layer as a Luma - track matte for adjustment layers or even a colored solid with a blend mode will be easy. Add Black And White, Gaussian Blur, and Curves to create a Luma Track Matte from the footage. The combination of color correction or channel effects you use to create the track matte depends on the footage but for this shot, this is probably the easiest setup. As far as tracking, if you want to keep the layers lined up you can either use Motion Tracking or Camera Tracking. The most efficient technique depends on the shot. 

 

I used a screenshot of your screenshot to do a quick tutorial.

I hope this helps. If you need help with the tracking let us see the shot. It might even be better to start a new thread.

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New Here ,
Apr 30, 2020

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Thank you. That really helped. I do have one more question. If want to make another clip in my project that same yellow, so I have to make another layer? Is it common for projects to have a ton of layers for this sort of thing.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 30, 2020

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I am working on a project right now that is under 100 frames long, has 3 layers in the main comp, one of them is a nested comp (pre-comp) that contains what would be equivalent to your glow effect. I call it the repair comp because I'm fixing something in the scene that the director does not want the audience to see. That nested comp, the repair comp has 9 layers in it. Four of those nine layers are also nested comps, each of them with two or three layers each. There are a total of 74 photoshop files in a sequence in one of the nested comps, all required to successfully remove the object from the scene, so that is a total of just over 100 layers required to repair a shot less than 100 frames long and only one comp, the one with the sequenced photoshop files, has layers that are shorter than the entire shot.

 

That tells you how complex a shot can be. Most of them are not that complex, but the more layers you have the more control you have and pre-comps are your friend.

 

If your original shot of the buildings needed color correction, and the camera was moving, and you needed to do something with the sky and add a glow to some of the windows I would probably layout the shot like this. 

Screenshot_2020-04-30 11.34.02_4gVzWs.png

That is the Flow Chart for the Main comp, Scene 10.1 that contains three pre-comps that are used to actually simplify the workflow and give me more control. For example, if I want to change the overall color correction for the original footage I go to the CC Footage comp and change the settings in the adjustment layer instead of having to color correct layers 8, 6, and 5.

 

I hope this helps. 

 

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