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Can I export other than 72 dpi movie from AE ?

New Here ,
Sep 04, 2020

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Hi

 

I am supposed to deliver an mp4 movie-composition in 96 DPI resolution for mega screen – can I alter the output DPI for movies in AE render-queue ???

 

 

Best, Jes

Video in general doesn't know DPI. Video is always rasterized and the size of a pixel depends on the hardware only.

On large screens (public viewing), usual the pixels are very large, too. A higher DPI doesn't make any sense for this, even if it would be possible to set it up. *Martin

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Can I export other than 72 dpi movie from AE ?

New Here ,
Sep 04, 2020

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Hi

 

I am supposed to deliver an mp4 movie-composition in 96 DPI resolution for mega screen – can I alter the output DPI for movies in AE render-queue ???

 

 

Best, Jes

Video in general doesn't know DPI. Video is always rasterized and the size of a pixel depends on the hardware only.

On large screens (public viewing), usual the pixels are very large, too. A higher DPI doesn't make any sense for this, even if it would be possible to set it up. *Martin

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Most Valuable Participant ,
Sep 04, 2020

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There's no such settings. After effects only knows pixels. No ppi or dpi, only resolution. 

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Guide ,
Sep 04, 2020

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Video in general doesn't know DPI. Video is always rasterized and the size of a pixel depends on the hardware only.

On large screens (public viewing), usual the pixels are very large, too. A higher DPI doesn't make any sense for this, even if it would be possible to set it up. *Martin

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 04, 2020

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I will try and make this simple. High-resolution images have a lot of pixels. The more pixels, the more data, the more data, the higher the resolution. Unfortunately, even people that teach in universities don't make this clear and use the wrong terms. Video, the web, mobile devices, all electronic devices that are capable of displaying images use pixels. You want high resolution, you supply more pixels. Here's a fun test that you can run. Download both of these images. They are exactly the same resolution - the same size. Drop them both in an app designed to print images like Word or In Design. One of them will be hard to see, the other will more than fill a page. The PPI metadata in an image file just tells the printer or the page layout program, how many pixels to print on an inch of paper.

9999ppi.jpg

1ppi.jpg

I hope this helps you figure things out. There is no video standard that includes pixels per inch. 

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Most Valuable Participant ,
Sep 04, 2020

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As the others already said, it's utterly irrelevant for video. Video runs in absolute pixels.

 

Mylenium

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New Here ,
Sep 05, 2020

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Thanks a lot guys! Very helpful. I must admit, it's the first time I supplied with this kind of odd pixel information from an outdoor media vendor. Thanks again for clarifying 🙂

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