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Making objects react (ie circles bouncing and reacting to each other)

New Here ,
Sep 04, 2020

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Hi all - I'm trying to create an animated poster that has a series of circles moving through the tubes (as shown in picture) - but I want to make the motion as realistic as possible. I found the Bounce expression when I was doing some Googling, but ideally I'd like the circles to react to each other so that they can bounce and move through the space together. Does anyone have any advice on this in AE or is buying Newton3 the only option? Thanks in advance! 🙂 Screen Shot 2020-09-04 at 6.25.16 PM.png

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Making objects react (ie circles bouncing and reacting to each other)

New Here ,
Sep 04, 2020

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Hi all - I'm trying to create an animated poster that has a series of circles moving through the tubes (as shown in picture) - but I want to make the motion as realistic as possible. I found the Bounce expression when I was doing some Googling, but ideally I'd like the circles to react to each other so that they can bounce and move through the space together. Does anyone have any advice on this in AE or is buying Newton3 the only option? Thanks in advance! 🙂 Screen Shot 2020-09-04 at 6.25.16 PM.png

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Sep 04, 2020 0
Most Valuable Participant ,
Sep 05, 2020

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No need for Newton:

 

http://www.motionscript.com/design-guide/proximity.html

 

Of course yoiu still need to combine it with the bounce formula somehow and also figure out the motion of the balls. Really depends on what you're after. I'd only get into actual physics simulation if things like energy conservation were relevant, but then again of course simply hitting a few buttons in a plug-in may still be easier than writing a ton of expressions. Again, not imposssible to do manually, but which way you go will depend on what result you need and how quickly you can get there. Just from your image it's not even clear how you want your dots to move around or how they should behave when they encounter blockages or hit each other, so that alone would require some better explanation.

 

Mylenium

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Sep 05, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 05, 2020

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If you just use proximity testing from Dan Ebberts Motionscript site you will not be able to keep the balls lined up on motion paths. Newton would make things a lot easier. I'm pretty good at expressions but I think it would take me a couple of hours to figure out how to keep an animated circle on a motion path and still have it bounce off other circles on the same path. All that I am sure of is that the circle layers would have to look at the layer above them and the layer below them in the timeline and those 3 layers would have to be in line in the comp and on the same path. Then you would have to figure out which ball was moving and make the others react to that movement. Now that I've explained all of that to myself I'm going to add a couple more hours to fiddling with the expressions. It's probably going to have to use some of the techniques used in inverse kinematics. Just getting layers to bounce off each other is pretty easy. Getting them to bounce and not deviate from the path is going to be a lot harder.

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Sep 05, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 05, 2020

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Newton will be a good option here, as would Physics Now!

Another option that you actually might not immediately think of is Adobe Character Animator - it's got physics built right in! Check out the Chicken Blaster game they have built in as one of the demos.

3d software like Cinema 4D is also a good place to do physics sims like this. 

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Sep 05, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 05, 2020

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Superluminal's Stardust plug-in is also an option.  Newton would be simpler set-up but for the same price you get alot more in Stardust.  If you're willing to consider Newton you may as well go with Stardust.  And get a powerful particle engine with volume rendering and 3d models and all that.  

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Sep 05, 2020 1