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Split Screens & Cut Scenes from Guy Richie's "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." Adaption

Community Beginner ,
Jul 27, 2020

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Dear Adobe AE community,

 

Does anyone have an idea on how to best approach (= emulate) Guy Richie's awesome SPLIT SCREEN & CUT-SCENE TRANSitions in his adaption of "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." - The "Invasion" Scene:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zxod_reabtc

(I think it was made by Blue Spill.)

My aim is to produce a quick 'n' catchy promo vid for my friend's business (free of charge and also as a means to apply recently acquired knowledge in AE.)

 

I have a vague idea on how to approach it with 

- MASKS & MATTES, 

but I'm not sure what the best workflow is when it comes to

- keeping it lean, clean & efficient as well as going easy on my rig, that is, not explode 💣:laptop_computer:💥🤯 my PC.

Also, some of the 'PUSH' animations seem like they're made with 3D cameras.

Many, many kind thanks in advance from Switzerland 🤙🤝:place_of_worship:,
Sandro

2015's most stylish and action-packed spy film THE MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E., starring Henry Cavill (Man of Steel), is available on Digital HD, Blu-ray™ and DVD fr...
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Correct answer by Mylenium | Most Valuable Participant

Sorry, but this forum makes it difficult to keep up with posts unless one subscribes to e-mail notifications.

 

Re 1.):

 

Could be as trivial as slap-dab placing your clips directly on the timeline and masking them. Really more am tter of preference than anything else as long as you don't mess up the placement. Of course you can always link them by placing them inside a pre-composition, parenting or expressions.

 

Re 2.):

 

It's all an illusion. My point specifically being that you may want to split clips for practical reasons even if in the parent comp or whatever they appear as one single clip. A good example for this could e.g. be a long panorama pan that you may want to stitch together from separately stabilized segments based on the same clip.

 

Re 3.):

 

Yes, you may have to use the tracker occasionally. To stick with the previous example: You may have a car driving in your panorama that needs to remain centered and instead of manually counter-animating positional offsets later you would first pin it dead in the center and then do all your other work.

 

To sum it up: the point in most cases will be to eliminate any relative movement intrinsic in the clips first so you can later animate them based on your own rules within what they allow.

 

Mylenium

 

 

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Split Screens & Cut Scenes from Guy Richie's "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." Adaption

Community Beginner ,
Jul 27, 2020

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Dear Adobe AE community,

 

Does anyone have an idea on how to best approach (= emulate) Guy Richie's awesome SPLIT SCREEN & CUT-SCENE TRANSitions in his adaption of "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." - The "Invasion" Scene:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zxod_reabtc

(I think it was made by Blue Spill.)

My aim is to produce a quick 'n' catchy promo vid for my friend's business (free of charge and also as a means to apply recently acquired knowledge in AE.)

 

I have a vague idea on how to approach it with 

- MASKS & MATTES, 

but I'm not sure what the best workflow is when it comes to

- keeping it lean, clean & efficient as well as going easy on my rig, that is, not explode 💣:laptop_computer:💥🤯 my PC.

Also, some of the 'PUSH' animations seem like they're made with 3D cameras.

Many, many kind thanks in advance from Switzerland 🤙🤝:place_of_worship:,
Sandro

2015's most stylish and action-packed spy film THE MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E., starring Henry Cavill (Man of Steel), is available on Digital HD, Blu-ray™ and DVD fr...
Most Valuable Participant
Correct answer by Mylenium | Most Valuable Participant

Sorry, but this forum makes it difficult to keep up with posts unless one subscribes to e-mail notifications.

 

Re 1.):

 

Could be as trivial as slap-dab placing your clips directly on the timeline and masking them. Really more am tter of preference than anything else as long as you don't mess up the placement. Of course you can always link them by placing them inside a pre-composition, parenting or expressions.

 

Re 2.):

 

It's all an illusion. My point specifically being that you may want to split clips for practical reasons even if in the parent comp or whatever they appear as one single clip. A good example for this could e.g. be a long panorama pan that you may want to stitch together from separately stabilized segments based on the same clip.

 

Re 3.):

 

Yes, you may have to use the tracker occasionally. To stick with the previous example: You may have a car driving in your panorama that needs to remain centered and instead of manually counter-animating positional offsets later you would first pin it dead in the center and then do all your other work.

 

To sum it up: the point in most cases will be to eliminate any relative movement intrinsic in the clips first so you can later animate them based on your own rules within what they allow.

 

Mylenium

 

 

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Most Valuable Participant ,
Jul 27, 2020

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Not really much to it. You basically have figured out everything - it's just simple masks/ mattes with teh only real finesse being that they come in to musical cues and sometimes follow the motion in the clips themselves, adhering to the animation principle of anticipation. I don'tz think this will be particularly taxing, as for reasons of efficiency you'd simply build each transition as its separate comp, meaning you'll never have more than 8 clips, in most cases only 2. You just need to find good places for splitting up everything so it can be seamlessly re-assembled in a master comp later. It's really more about the timing. The rest is pretty simple by AE standards, even if there may be some occasional tracking/ stabilization involved to keep things centered. That's also one more of the reasons why you would work in separate comps to begin with.

 

Mylenium

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 04, 2020

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Hi dear Mylenium (but not Millennial? 😉8)),

 

Thank YOU for the ultra-swift reply and an abject 'SORRY' for MY beLATEd one.

 

"[N]ot very taxing" by your standards probably - please keep in mind that I'm still a bit of a newb-boôob. 🥴😬😅

 

Follow-up question(s):

(1) "in most cases only 2" - as it's only a simple SPLIT SCREEN which I'll then pre-compose to push / fold / else animate with another one?

 

(2) Uhm, I'm terribly sorry, but I don't really understand what you mean by
"find good places for splitting up everything so it can be seamlessly re-assembled in a master comp later" (my bold print).

 

(3)  Likewise, I'm not quite sure what to make of
"occasional tracking/ stabilization involved to keep things centered" (my bold print)

- Do you mean that I have to run a TRACKER on a clip / scene? And then what?

 

Terribly sorry to bother you again.

 

Best regards & many thanks in advance,
Sandro

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Most Valuable Participant ,
Aug 12, 2020

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Sorry, but this forum makes it difficult to keep up with posts unless one subscribes to e-mail notifications.

 

Re 1.):

 

Could be as trivial as slap-dab placing your clips directly on the timeline and masking them. Really more am tter of preference than anything else as long as you don't mess up the placement. Of course you can always link them by placing them inside a pre-composition, parenting or expressions.

 

Re 2.):

 

It's all an illusion. My point specifically being that you may want to split clips for practical reasons even if in the parent comp or whatever they appear as one single clip. A good example for this could e.g. be a long panorama pan that you may want to stitch together from separately stabilized segments based on the same clip.

 

Re 3.):

 

Yes, you may have to use the tracker occasionally. To stick with the previous example: You may have a car driving in your panorama that needs to remain centered and instead of manually counter-animating positional offsets later you would first pin it dead in the center and then do all your other work.

 

To sum it up: the point in most cases will be to eliminate any relative movement intrinsic in the clips first so you can later animate them based on your own rules within what they allow.

 

Mylenium

 

 

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 12, 2020

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Hi Mylenium,

WoÔoW! Thank you kindly for your very exhaustive answer.

Yes, the forum doesn't make it very easy to follow up - that's true.

 

Very best wishes & iterated thanks from Switzerland,

Sandro

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