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What is that light colored layer below my object? How do I get rid of it?

Community Beginner ,
Nov 19, 2020

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I am sorry, I do not even know the name for this. I tried googling for it but since I don't know the name, I could not find an answer. I shrank the length of my objects and that appeared for one of them, if I move it (trying to shrink it to the size of my object's time length), the effects and animations I have applied to that particular object move too. I have drawn a red line to point what I am talking about. Also, my pointer changes to a strange "double arrow with limits" figure but my pointer does not appear in the screenshot.

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Correct answer by Mylenium | Most Valuable Participant

There is no requirement to "conveniently group objects" or anything of the sort. It's a fundamental principle of how AE works. the faded areas are the trimmed away bits of a layer's source, nothing more. You can of course trim pre-comps to the exact length, but you can't avoid this from re-appearing with actual source files for audio and video, so simply get used to it.

 

Mylenium

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What is that light colored layer below my object? How do I get rid of it?

Community Beginner ,
Nov 19, 2020

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Screenshot (714)_LI.jpg

I am sorry, I do not even know the name for this. I tried googling for it but since I don't know the name, I could not find an answer. I shrank the length of my objects and that appeared for one of them, if I move it (trying to shrink it to the size of my object's time length), the effects and animations I have applied to that particular object move too. I have drawn a red line to point what I am talking about. Also, my pointer changes to a strange "double arrow with limits" figure but my pointer does not appear in the screenshot.

Most Valuable Participant
Correct answer by Mylenium | Most Valuable Participant

There is no requirement to "conveniently group objects" or anything of the sort. It's a fundamental principle of how AE works. the faded areas are the trimmed away bits of a layer's source, nothing more. You can of course trim pre-comps to the exact length, but you can't avoid this from re-appearing with actual source files for audio and video, so simply get used to it.

 

Mylenium

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How to, User interface or workspaces

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Nov 19, 2020 0
Community Beginner ,
Nov 19, 2020

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I have figured it out what it is, since it's a pre-composed set of objects, I have to edit it by opening the composition I created and then drag the length of the whole set of objects. Is there a way to more conveniently grouping objects to prevent this from happening? Thanks in advance!

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Nov 19, 2020 0
Most Valuable Participant ,
Nov 19, 2020

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There is no requirement to "conveniently group objects" or anything of the sort. It's a fundamental principle of how AE works. the faded areas are the trimmed away bits of a layer's source, nothing more. You can of course trim pre-comps to the exact length, but you can't avoid this from re-appearing with actual source files for audio and video, so simply get used to it.

 

Mylenium

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Nov 19, 2020 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 20, 2020

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To learn the basics of the user interface start a new After Effects project and then select the Learn workspace. The UI is explained fairly well in just a few minutes. 

 

To get started with After Effects, the User Guide, available on this forum and the After Effects Product page as well as on AE's home screen, will efficiently take you through the basic steps of some of the most common workflows and teach you how to set up and manage to render your projects. You'll save a lot of time if you do a little homework.

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Nov 20, 2020 1