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How to make a multi action animation?

New Here ,
Apr 29, 2019

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Hi. I watched all of the tutorial videos but I still don't know the way of doing more advanced animations. I mean animations when 1'st character going to somewhere, then he pick up some thing, then he doing somethig etc. I can do if i don't have background and more characters.

I have graphic symbol with going character. What should I do if i want make other action in the same animation for the same character. Should I make another symbol and change it on the time line? I don't think it's easiest way.

Thanks

Hi again mate,

Here we go:

Best way to organise your file is to nest everything inside a container at main timeline level which you then use as camera and can mask.

Inside this initial container you are free to do anything that works to achieve your goals. Everything is possible and nothing is impossible.

You can have as many background layers behind the character(s) as you need - if you want to simulate parallax and you can have as many layers in front of the characters as you need as overlays.

My preferred way of working is to jump between 'bubble' and 'sandwich' methods for characters - bubble the walk cycles and break out of the bubble for everything that is not cyclical for better timing control.

But since you're novice, you can keep everything 'bubbled' for easier maintenance.

So in your case you have a walk cycle inside a graphic symbol which you tween from point A to point B; at point B you want the character to stop. You duplicate your walk cycle symbol and choose the frame that seems to be the most appropriate to break out of it, get rid of the rest and start animating in a linear fashion. Your walk remains intact. In this clone/duplicate container you animate the character stopping and picking up the 'something'; then you animate him doing an antic, turning the other way and starting a step. You choose a frame from your walk cycle toward which you aim as your last key of that fist half-step and now the two can seamlessly 'blend'. Not displaying the duplicate frame you switch to your horizontally flipped walk cycle and walk the character out of the screen.

Background remains passive/static at all times.

At main timeline level all this can be staged with a few cuts, close up, maybe zoom and pan.

All this is very simple and very logical, once you get your head around symbols.

There are no recipes. It's just common sense.

Good luck

NT

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How to make a multi action animation?

New Here ,
Apr 29, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

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Hi. I watched all of the tutorial videos but I still don't know the way of doing more advanced animations. I mean animations when 1'st character going to somewhere, then he pick up some thing, then he doing somethig etc. I can do if i don't have background and more characters.

I have graphic symbol with going character. What should I do if i want make other action in the same animation for the same character. Should I make another symbol and change it on the time line? I don't think it's easiest way.

Thanks

Hi again mate,

Here we go:

Best way to organise your file is to nest everything inside a container at main timeline level which you then use as camera and can mask.

Inside this initial container you are free to do anything that works to achieve your goals. Everything is possible and nothing is impossible.

You can have as many background layers behind the character(s) as you need - if you want to simulate parallax and you can have as many layers in front of the characters as you need as overlays.

My preferred way of working is to jump between 'bubble' and 'sandwich' methods for characters - bubble the walk cycles and break out of the bubble for everything that is not cyclical for better timing control.

But since you're novice, you can keep everything 'bubbled' for easier maintenance.

So in your case you have a walk cycle inside a graphic symbol which you tween from point A to point B; at point B you want the character to stop. You duplicate your walk cycle symbol and choose the frame that seems to be the most appropriate to break out of it, get rid of the rest and start animating in a linear fashion. Your walk remains intact. In this clone/duplicate container you animate the character stopping and picking up the 'something'; then you animate him doing an antic, turning the other way and starting a step. You choose a frame from your walk cycle toward which you aim as your last key of that fist half-step and now the two can seamlessly 'blend'. Not displaying the duplicate frame you switch to your horizontally flipped walk cycle and walk the character out of the screen.

Background remains passive/static at all times.

At main timeline level all this can be staged with a few cuts, close up, maybe zoom and pan.

All this is very simple and very logical, once you get your head around symbols.

There are no recipes. It's just common sense.

Good luck

NT

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Apr 29, 2019 0
Guide ,
Apr 29, 2019

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Good day, mate!

This article may give you some idea how to structure your files.

There are also some sample files which you can download to see how they are put together.

I've also written other tutorials, so have a look around our site.

Hope this helps

NT

- Nick: Character designer and animator, Flash user since 1998
Member of Flanimate Power Tools team - extensions for character animation

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New Here ,
Apr 30, 2019

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Yes, this article help me a bit.

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Apr 30, 2019 0
Guide ,
Apr 30, 2019

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Hi again mate,

Here we go:

Best way to organise your file is to nest everything inside a container at main timeline level which you then use as camera and can mask.

Inside this initial container you are free to do anything that works to achieve your goals. Everything is possible and nothing is impossible.

You can have as many background layers behind the character(s) as you need - if you want to simulate parallax and you can have as many layers in front of the characters as you need as overlays.

My preferred way of working is to jump between 'bubble' and 'sandwich' methods for characters - bubble the walk cycles and break out of the bubble for everything that is not cyclical for better timing control.

But since you're novice, you can keep everything 'bubbled' for easier maintenance.

So in your case you have a walk cycle inside a graphic symbol which you tween from point A to point B; at point B you want the character to stop. You duplicate your walk cycle symbol and choose the frame that seems to be the most appropriate to break out of it, get rid of the rest and start animating in a linear fashion. Your walk remains intact. In this clone/duplicate container you animate the character stopping and picking up the 'something'; then you animate him doing an antic, turning the other way and starting a step. You choose a frame from your walk cycle toward which you aim as your last key of that fist half-step and now the two can seamlessly 'blend'. Not displaying the duplicate frame you switch to your horizontally flipped walk cycle and walk the character out of the screen.

Background remains passive/static at all times.

At main timeline level all this can be staged with a few cuts, close up, maybe zoom and pan.

All this is very simple and very logical, once you get your head around symbols.

There are no recipes. It's just common sense.

Good luck

NT

- Nick: Character designer and animator, Flash user since 1998
Member of Flanimate Power Tools team - extensions for character animation

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Apr 30, 2019 0