• Global community
    • Language:
      • Deutsch
      • English
      • Español
      • Français
      • Português
  • 日本語コミュニティ
    Dedicated community for Japanese speakers
  • 한국 커뮤니티
    Dedicated community for Korean speakers
Exit
0

MOST STRANGEST THING WITH ADOBE AUDITION 23

Community Beginner ,
Jul 29, 2023 Jul 29, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I've had this issue for years and I can't figure it out for the life of me...

I attached a short video I did to explain it. Please help ASAP! Thanks

 

Bug Unresolved
TOPICS
Multitrack editor

Views

164

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines

correct answers 1 Correct answer

Community Expert , Sep 08, 2023 Sep 08, 2023

The Pre- and Post- fader issue doesn't affect the OP's original issue, but is almost certainly what you need to address. If you apply effects Pre-fader then the effects signals you get when you push the fader up and down will alter with the fader level. If you put effects Post-fader, then the effect level will remain the same whatever you do with the fader.

 

As for the rest of it, it's relatively simple to explain, but it does require you to understand what a hardware mixer does, because that i

...

Votes

Translate

Translate
6 Comments
Community Expert ,
Jul 30, 2023 Jul 30, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I tried it here - same thing happens. I think it's a bug, but probably not one you want fixed... you really shouldn't see anything in the meters with the track volume turned down; that is an anomaly.

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Adobe Employee ,
Aug 04, 2023 Aug 04, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thank you for the video. We acknowledge the bug that when the input device changes, the track level meters ignore the track volume. We will look at this one in a future release.

 

I'd agree with Steve and clarify that the track level meters should react to the track volume in that if the volume is set that low, the levels should show nothing.

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Beginner ,
Sep 08, 2023 Sep 08, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thank you Mr. Steve for responding. I was told that its a good thing that way. To be able to slide the faders up and down and not effect the origianl input volume of that track. When I set my plugins I like and I happen to adjust the fader volume, I then have to redo my plugin settings to match the new volume. I thought thats why we want a post fader so when we adjust the volume, it doesnt effect the plugins we already have set. Hopefully I explained that right lol

 

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Beginner ,
Sep 08, 2023 Sep 08, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Ok thank you for responding and you're welcome. So, what is the proper way to adjust the volume of a track without effecting the settings I already have set in the plugins?

 

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Expert ,
Sep 08, 2023 Sep 08, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

The Pre- and Post- fader issue doesn't affect the OP's original issue, but is almost certainly what you need to address. If you apply effects Pre-fader then the effects signals you get when you push the fader up and down will alter with the fader level. If you put effects Post-fader, then the effect level will remain the same whatever you do with the fader.

 

As for the rest of it, it's relatively simple to explain, but it does require you to understand what a hardware mixer does, because that is what the Audition mixer is emulating - actually pretty accurately (when it's working properly...). In a hardware mixer, the level indicators on the channels will represent the level set by the fader. It looks a little confusing in Audition because the meter on the track mimics the one on the mixer panel, so the levels will follow the fader position. I think the idea of this is to save you constantly having to switch to the mixer panel just to make level adjustments.

 

What Audition doesn't have (and it would solve the OP's issue) is input meters on tracks. These would give a relative indication of the input level. Now, if you increased the gain on a channel - and that's the control that comes first in a real mixer - then the track level would appear to be higher. You can do this in Audition on a clip by clip basis,  but you have to use the Properties panel basic settings - that's the only place where there's an actual clip gain control which can alter the input level on individual clips. There's a shortcut to this from any clip you've highlighted - Shift+G.

 

But as I said, the level control in the track box is only a mimic of the fader, so that only affects the track output level fed into the Master channel.

 

The view was that because the Properties gain control alters the waveform visibility on the track, you don't really need an input level meter, and I think that's a reasonable point. On a hardware mixer they are rare - often you just get a couple of LEDs to indicate that there's an adequate signal there - if you are lucky. In Audition you can see pretty clearly what's in your track, so you are already at a considerable advantage from this POV.

 

So in conclusion: you can't put a gain knob on a track, because they are clip-based, but the access to them is easy with the shortcut - highlight the clip or clips you want to change the gain of and hit Shift+G. Yes, this works with multiple clips across multiple tracks simultaneously - pretty powerful.

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Beginner ,
Sep 09, 2023 Sep 09, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

LATEST

Thank you Mr. Steve. I completely understand everything you said. Makes so much more sense now. God bless you

 

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report