Artifact? maddening

Enthusiast ,
Jan 30, 2021 Jan 30, 2021

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I'm learning a bit at a time. Am finally using my USB Blue Yeti according to instructions, so my tracks do not need nearly so many effects as they used to. However. One effect I really need is the DE-HUMMER. There is a monstrous hum which is easily removed by  either Audition's dehummer or Izotope's dehummer. And the voice quality (I'm narrating a book) doesn't seem to suffer at all. But after the track is de-hummed (and I've tried all the settings of the plugins) there are these little things that sound like thumps or clunks. They happen in the spaces usual right before voice audio but sometimes, like in the attached image, right after. That little red wedge looking thing. And they CAN be deleted, one at a time, with the marquee tool. But they are a major pain. Any suggestions. (I figure the hum is coming via the computer). Any advice greatly appreciated. https://www.dropbox.com/s/0m29emaecbzv3vu/Screen_Shot_2021-01-30_at_6_18_00_PM.jpg?dl=0

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Audio hardware , How to , Noise reduction

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Adobe Community Professional , Jan 31, 2021 Jan 31, 2021
Yes, the Noise Reducer is the way to go - I've tried it on your samples. It's pretty clearly fan noise, which means that it has a narrow spectrum band of noise at low frequency but not noises at specific frequencies - which is why the de-hummer, etc wouldn't fix it. But, because it's a very low frequency noise you need to be careful with the settings.  With the second sample, I set the FFT size to the minimum it goes down to (512) and took the noise sample from the silence in the middel of it - ...

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 31, 2021 Jan 31, 2021

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Whatever they are, they look as though they are very low frequency, although it's hard to tell because there is no reference shown in your picture. I'm a little more concerned about a 'monstrous' hum. Could you provide a short audio example of it, please? Wav preferrably, not MP3. Having this means two things - firstly what might be some alternative settings to eliminate it, but also it should be possible to work out what's causing it, and eliminate that, which would be rather better...

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Enthusiast ,
Jan 31, 2021 Jan 31, 2021

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Okay. Monstrous was an exaggeration. Here is a link https://www.dropbox.com/sh/be6nxijhg1xa7kj/AAAIA-NWpQ06-IQECrXOA6BNa?dl=0

(I'm reading from a book)

1. The mic is on my desk next to the computer as in the photo and that's how the recording was made

2. The mic is on a table next to the desk in photo and track

And thanks. I'm thinking of trying the noise remover instead of the hum remover...

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 31, 2021 Jan 31, 2021

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Yes, the Noise Reducer is the way to go - I've tried it on your samples. It's pretty clearly fan noise, which means that it has a narrow spectrum band of noise at low frequency but not noises at specific frequencies - which is why the de-hummer, etc wouldn't fix it. But, because it's a very low frequency noise you need to be careful with the settings.  With the second sample, I set the FFT size to the minimum it goes down to (512) and took the noise sample from the silence in the middel of it - try to include just the noise at the bottom of the spectral response. Then I set the Noise Reduction slider to 80% and the Reduce By slider to 10dB, and it removed most of it. You could do this twice if you wanted - use a lower setting on the Reduce By slider - say, 6dB on the first pass, and reset the FFT size one notch up (1024), take a new sample and then do another pass at 6dB - you might find that this is a slight improvement.

 

Normally the really low FFT sizes don't do a lot for general noise reduction, but when it's all at a low frequency they come into their own. It's all to do with the wavelength of the sounds you're trying to treat; that's what having a smaller number, and consequently a larger window, helps with.

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Enthusiast ,
Jan 31, 2021 Jan 31, 2021

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Oh thanks again! Okay, I've never used the FFT, so I've got to study it a little. Very grateful.

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