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Match Loudness and Match Clip Loudness

Guide ,
Jul 07, 2020 Jul 07, 2020

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Hello Everyone.

 

If I right-click on my Clips, I can choose Match Clip Loudness. Also, Inside the Window- Match Loudness, I can drag my Clips and use this Feature. I noticed Match Clip Loudness has Target Loudness and Tolerance. and I noticed, Window- Match Loudness has additional Features such as Max True Peak Level, Look-Ahead Time, and Release Time. Which one is better to use?

Thank you very much.

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Community Expert ,
Jul 08, 2020 Jul 08, 2020

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I don't think it makes any difference - unless you are desperate to play around with the minor parameters, of course.

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Engaged ,
Jul 08, 2020 Jul 08, 2020

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The supplimental [Loudness Normalization] Limiter included in the Match Loudness module makes all the difference. Basically Loudness Normalization is measurement, gain, and limiting (if necessary). When you define an Integrated Loudness target and a True Peak ceiling - the source audio is measured in it's entirety. Gain is added (or subtracted) based on the measured (I) loudness relative to the defined (I) target. If any such added gain results in True Peak ceiling overshoots - the limiter engages and maintains compliance. 

 

Consider this - you may have a finished piece for broadcast with ATSC A/85 compliance requirements (-24 LUFS/ -2 dBTP). You are also asked to create an alternate master for online streaming. Maybe -16 LUFS/ -2dbTP. That's a significant amount of supplimental added gain. Without the limiter (and of course depending on available headroom) - you run the risk of overshoots and/or clipping. 

 

In any case the multitrack Match Clip Loudness option (ITU-R BS.1770-3 mode) does not include an option to define a True Peak ceiling. If the source audio requires significant gain to meet your defined (I) target - there's no fail-safe. Overshoots, clipping, distortion, etc. (and non-compliance) may be unavoidable.

 

-paul.

@produceNewMedia. 

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Community Expert ,
Jul 08, 2020 Jul 08, 2020

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Basically any version of this is just a desperate attempt to automate what your ears should be able to tell you... and it doesn't work very well either.

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Guide ,
Jul 08, 2020 Jul 08, 2020

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Dear Steve G_AudioMasters

Thank you very much.

My background Is In photo and Video. Sound can be very Tricky.

I really Truly like Audition.

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Community Expert ,
Jul 09, 2020 Jul 09, 2020

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Perhaps I should explain a bit more, and I'll apologise in advance for it being a bit of a rant. Paul's example is typical of what happens when somebody doing the audio manages to make it 'compliant' without understanding exactly what's happened in the process. All of these issues could be avoided in the first place with sensible setting of levels, and a bit of judicious limiting - and it's these things that need to be understood, rather than blindly following the results of a system that attempts to emulate your ears - but ultimately can't. This is why the BBC has been remarkably reluctant to accept it, despite every other broadcaster in the world seeming to think it's wonderful. And it isn't wonderful at all.

 

The idea is that all TV programmes should have similar sound levels, the adverts shouldn't deafen you, and that you can change channels at will without leaping for the volume control. Guess what? That doesn't work at all! They're still all over the place. One of the primary reasons for this is that all broadcast chains have a final processor on them that will 'fix' the output, regardless of what you did. Typically these are Orban Optimods, and most broadcast engineers set them up differently, according almost to their own whims as far as I can tell. So it is still the case that you should be careful with your audio before you let it out, and only be left with an easy level shift to make it fit some arbitrary scheme dreamed up by a bureaucrat in Brussels...

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Guide ,
Jul 08, 2020 Jul 08, 2020

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DePaul

Thank you very much.

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