Converting TIFF to DNG

New Here ,
Jun 20, 2008

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It's possible to convert a TIFF file to DNG in Lightroom, and I could have sworn I had done it at least once with the DNG Converter that comes with the Camera Raw plug-in. Now it works only with Lightroom. Is there some way to convert a TIFF file to DNG in Photoshop alone? I'm currently using CS, not yet having had time to upgrade to CS3.

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Enthusiast ,
Aug 29, 2008

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The JPEG image never did contain the white balance information that is stored in a raw image. It only contains the embedded profile, and that is all that can be included in the DNG conversion. As I've said before, DNG files created from JPEG or TIFF images are different. They don't contain all the metadata.

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Enthusiast ,
Aug 29, 2008

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As far as I'm concerned, there is no logical reason to convert a JPEG or a TIF image to the DNG format. Some people seem to think that by doing this while they are creating a raw file. But that simply is not the case. The image has already been preprocessed in the camera, it has been demosaiced, and in the case of a JPEG image in particular it is an 8-bit image. Converting it to DNG is not going to magically change it to a higher bit image and create all the extra image data.

Even for the purposes of a smooth workflow it doesn't make sense to me. It isn't the same kind of image file, and it seems to me that it would probably have to be handled differently in editing in Photoshop. But if, for some reason, you feel you are defying reality and are creating some magical image by doing the conversion, have fun. It just doesn't make sense to me.

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Explorer ,
Aug 29, 2008

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Like I said it just seems confusing to me especially a couple of years out
when you don't remember what's what.

Robert

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Explorer ,
Aug 29, 2008

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>As far as I'm concerned, there is no logical reason to convert a JPEG or a TIF image to the DNG format.

Actually there are both workflow and technical reasons to do so. You want to adjust hundreds of JPEG images quickly and easy? Open in Camera Raw, adjust the images and resave them as JPEG, TIFF or PSD. A lot quicker than doing so one by one in Photoshop.

Technically, doing substantial adjustments to JPEGs (in particular) in Camera Raw will result in better final images than doing so adjustment by adjustment in Photoshop. You'll get less rounding errors and the final resultant image will be smoother doing the same thing in Photoshop with less chance of banding.

Look, there are two flavors of DNG...one where the data is un-demosiaced and one that is. The fact that Camera Raw (and Lightroom) can edit both flavors is actually a plus. Yes, it might be useful for have some indicator whether a DNG is raw or linear....but for the purpose of Camera Raw and Lightroom, both are treated the same with the raw file having far more flexibility in processing. But don't dismiss the usefulness of working on non-raw files as DNG.

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Explorer ,
Aug 29, 2008

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Jeff_Schewe@adobeforums.com wrote:
>
> Actually there are both workflow and technical reasons to do so.

You started me down this path, Jeff, thanks much. And you explain it much more
eloquently than I've been able to :)

BTW, it was my understanding that some future rev of DNG was going to be tweaked
a bit to handle tiffs and jpegs better. Any insight?

-X

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Enthusiast ,
Aug 29, 2008

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Thank you for setting me straight, Jeff. I have used ACR to edit JPEG images frequently, but had never considered that there was any value to saving them as DNG files. I will have to go back and give that a try on some of them.

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Explorer ,
Aug 29, 2008

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>BTW, it was my understanding that some future rev of DNG was going to be tweaked
a bit to handle tiffs and jpegs better. Any insight?

You mean a future rev of Camera Raw? I can't comment on thatother than to say that even Camera Raw 4.5 now has it's own virtual memory and can open a 512MP imagewell beyond the old limit of 10,000 pixels.

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