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ColdFusion 11 license questions

Community Beginner ,
Jul 29, 2016

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Hello,

I am currently considering virtualizing our current ColdFusion 11 Standard server and would like some clarification on the licensing
aspect. Reading the EULA it states one license allows for one virtual machine with up to two vcores/vprocs. What I’m unclear about is the GHZ restrictions.

The 5GHz is per vcore or per virtual machine?  Is this a host restriction or can be throttled on the VM instance? For instance, can you have a single VM with 2 vcores at 3 GHz  with a single license or do they need to be throttled at 2.5GHz?

As far as physical server if I understand correctly you define CPU not by physical processor but # of cores divided by 4.  So one standard license would cover a one physical processor with up to 4 cores or 2 CPU with up to 8 cores total?

Please correct/clarify as needed. Thx!

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Correct answer by Carl_Von_Stetten | Most Valuable Participant

I missed section 1.4 (I searched the PDF for "divide" but not "dividing").  Section 3.1. didn't mention the cores/4 part though (I have read that part carefully). 

However, based on section 1.4, I'd say that a single Standard license will cover either a single physical CPU (pCPU) with up to 8 cores, or two pCPUs with up to 4 cores each.

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ColdFusion 11 license questions

Community Beginner ,
Jul 29, 2016

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Hello,

I am currently considering virtualizing our current ColdFusion 11 Standard server and would like some clarification on the licensing
aspect. Reading the EULA it states one license allows for one virtual machine with up to two vcores/vprocs. What I’m unclear about is the GHZ restrictions.

The 5GHz is per vcore or per virtual machine?  Is this a host restriction or can be throttled on the VM instance? For instance, can you have a single VM with 2 vcores at 3 GHz  with a single license or do they need to be throttled at 2.5GHz?

As far as physical server if I understand correctly you define CPU not by physical processor but # of cores divided by 4.  So one standard license would cover a one physical processor with up to 4 cores or 2 CPU with up to 8 cores total?

Please correct/clarify as needed. Thx!

Most Valuable Participant
Correct answer by Carl_Von_Stetten | Most Valuable Participant

I missed section 1.4 (I searched the PDF for "divide" but not "dividing").  Section 3.1. didn't mention the cores/4 part though (I have read that part carefully). 

However, based on section 1.4, I'd say that a single Standard license will cover either a single physical CPU (pCPU) with up to 8 cores, or two pCPUs with up to 4 cores each.

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Jul 29, 2016 0
Most Valuable Participant ,
Aug 01, 2016

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I believe the licensing is an either/or thing - either you license based on vCPU count OR you license by GHz.  The terms for licensing by vCPU were designed primarily for on-premise virtualization (like VMware ESXi or Microsoft Windows HyperV) where you have control over how many vCPUs get allocated for a virtual machine.  The terms for licensing by GHz were intended for cloud deployments (like Amazon or Azure) where you "rent" resources in terms of CPU power (GHz) and time.

So if you are visualizing on-premise, you probably want to stick with the vCPU approach as it is simpler.  One Standard license would cover a virtual machine with up to two vCPUs (cores).

And as far as physical servers, under ColdFusion 11 it is solely based on the number of physical CPUs (regardless of how many cores are on each CPU).  I can't see anywhere in the ColdFusion 11 EULA where it talks about dividing # of cores by 4.

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Aug 01, 2016 0
Community Beginner ,
Aug 01, 2016

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I'm referring to section 3.11 and section 1.4

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Aug 01, 2016 0
Community Beginner ,
Aug 01, 2016

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Most Valuable Participant ,
Aug 01, 2016

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I missed section 1.4 (I searched the PDF for "divide" but not "dividing").  Section 3.1. didn't mention the cores/4 part though (I have read that part carefully). 

However, based on section 1.4, I'd say that a single Standard license will cover either a single physical CPU (pCPU) with up to 8 cores, or two pCPUs with up to 4 cores each.

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 01, 2016

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Thanks for responding. I hate licensing and it gets worse every year.

Finally saw 1.15 that states the 2 CPUs (8 cores) for physical and the link to email adobecoldfusion@adobe.com

So an on premise VM is limited to two cores and no requirement to throttle vcores at 2.5GHz.

party of the first part agrees stipulations within said document as long as ye both shall live.

So say we all.

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