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ColdFusion 2018, do I need Standard or Enterprise edition?

Explorer ,
Jul 29, 2020

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I need to purchase a ColdFusion 2018 license, and I'm on the fence of what edition our company needs. Our company is small, and doesn't want to overpay, but I do not want our web applications to suffer from slow performance. For an environment that has around 300-350 maximum users that login, and 12 active web applications with more being developed, which edition should I go with? What are the specific reasons why I should go with this edition over the other? I'm thinking it would be wiser to go with Enterprise edition based off the companies growth, but I would like specific input as to why this would be the best choice. Any answers will be greatly appreciated.

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ColdFusion 2018, do I need Standard or Enterprise edition?

Explorer ,
Jul 29, 2020

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I need to purchase a ColdFusion 2018 license, and I'm on the fence of what edition our company needs. Our company is small, and doesn't want to overpay, but I do not want our web applications to suffer from slow performance. For an environment that has around 300-350 maximum users that login, and 12 active web applications with more being developed, which edition should I go with? What are the specific reasons why I should go with this edition over the other? I'm thinking it would be wiser to go with Enterprise edition based off the companies growth, but I would like specific input as to why this would be the best choice. Any answers will be greatly appreciated.

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Documentation, Server administration

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Jul 29, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 29, 2020

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This is kind of a tough question to answer with limited information, ultimately you'll have to decide this yourself. Key questions for you:

 

Do our apps use Oracle? Enterprise comes with DataDirect JDBC drivers for Oracle which are probably better than Oracle's own drivers.

 

Do we use any of the Enterprise features? PDF generation, API management, etc. I think the server monitoring may be an Enterprise feature now too. Look at the feature matrix for that.

 

Do we want to deploy CF within a customized J2EE environment?

 

What kind of hardware environment are we using? Enterprise lets you deploy multiple instances, which can help you take advantage of available memory on larger machines.

 

What would it cost us to deploy Enterprise vs Standard in larger environments? For example, you could deploy a bunch of "regular" machines behind a load balancer using Standard licenses for each. Enterprise may have different licensing allowances. (I don't really know the differences between Enterprise and Standard for multi-server deployment if there are any, consult the EULA for that and good luck with that! Someone here might have more information about that specific topic, though.)

 

Dave Watts, Eidolon LLC

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Jul 29, 2020 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 29, 2020

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Your initial decision should be based on 2 factors: the requirments of the application you intend to build and how much you are prepared to spend on the software project.

 

1) Requirements of the application

As Dave has said, the requirements of your application are of fundamental importance. They decide whether you should go for the Standard Edition or the Enterprise Edition of ColdFusion. Size doesn't matter.

 

You may have just two developers and a dozen customers. But then, you happen to be a bank or stockbroker. The two developers are in charge of an application that analyzes millions of bytes of financial data streaming through the servers every second. Your application converts the bytes into meaningful information. Your customers are themselves banks or big investors. Your servers communicate directly with theirs.

 

If so then, chances are, your application relies on threading, messaging, APIs, multiple instances and failover clustering. These are capabilites that are absent from the Standard Edition. Hence your choice will be the Enterprise Edition.

 

Have a look at the comparison of the capability offered by Standard and Enterprise: https://www.adobe.com/products/coldfusion-family/buying-guide.html

 

2) Total project expenditure

Your project budget may comprise, for example, the cost of:

a) Software analysis and design
b) 1 or more ColdFusion Developers
c) Adobe ColdFusion software: the 2018 release comes in two Editions, Standard (US$2,499 per two CPUs) and Enterprise (US$9,499 per two CPUs)
d) Some Project Management assistance

 

Is the scope of the project large or will it likely get larger? Is the project critical to your business, now or in the near future? If the answer to these questions is yes, then Analysis, Design and Project Management will in fact be the more indispensable, hence, costlier tasks than software development.

 

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Jul 29, 2020 1
Explorer ,
Jul 29, 2020

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When thinking about your applications are doing now, as well as what you may want them to do in the future, be sure to compare that list with the corresponding functionality in CF, and whether or not that functionality is limited to single-thread operation.  For us, PDF generation has become more and more of a requirement.  In Standard Ed., that is a single-thread task, which has forced us to migrate to Enterprise.  Yes, Enterprise has more features, but features that are common between the two version are, often times, more robust in Enterprise.

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Explorer ,
Jul 29, 2020

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Thank you Dave_Watts and BKBK for that information.  Looking at the ColdFusion edition comparison matrix, at the very bottom of the document there are a few footnotes, one that I don't quite understand.  How is performance impacted by Standard Edition running only one shared simultaneous request througth the EFR compared to Enterprise, assuming, can run unlimited request through the EFR?:

 

"2. Restricted features in ColdFusion Standard Edition: Enterprise features run through the Enterprise Feature Router (EFR).  These features run in the Standard edition.  However, all features running through the EFR are limited to one shared simultaneous request."

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 30, 2020

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DanielTheProgrammer: "How is performance impacted by Standard Edition running only one shared simultaneous request througth the EFR compared to Enterprise, assuming, can run unlimited request through the EFR?"

 

It means, in Enterprise a task may be shared among multiple concurrent threads. Whereas in Standard the EFR imposes a throttle, enabling just a single thread for the task. altascene gave a good example:  "For us, PDF generation has become more and more of a requirement.  In Standard Ed., that is a single-thread task, which has forced us to migrate to Enterprise. "

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Jul 30, 2020 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 30, 2020

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Lots of good thoughts here, but also some misstatements or things a reader could misinterpret (partly Adobe's fault per info on some of their pages). As I discuss these things with people often in my consulting, let me elaborate.

 

First, regarding some things asserted here to be enterprise-only, these ARE in fact in standard:

  •  PDF generation: both cfdocument and cfhtmltopdf are in standard (though, yes, they are single-threaded, per that efr mechanism later referenced here)
  • server monitoring: the new cf2018 pmt is in both editions (I realize Dave admitted he was unsure about this. And the older "server monitor" was indeed enterprise-only from cf8 to 2016)
  • Threading: that's a loaded word, of course. CF is inherently multithreaded. I suspect it's cfthread that's being referred to. And Standard sets a max of 10 for the number of concurrent cfthread threads
  • messaging: bkbj, were you  referring to the old feature within cfc gateway,or something else? Those are in standard
  • APIs (again, that's a loaded word. Standard supports APIs, in terms of serving or talking to APIs, whether as rest or just via json or web services, etc. What it does not have is the separate api manager, which is offered with enterpise only)

 

Not saying the above to merely nitpick or be critical, but because they may be important deciding factors for someone debating std vs ent. As has been suggested, see the feature pages from Adobe for more, though they do leave some things potentially unclear.

And that "restricted" footnote is about the EFR, which as indicated will single-thread requests to certain tags, so that if a request is running cf document, for instance, no other request can run it until the first one completes. That's just a small subset of tags (indicated by feature group on that page), but it is a real limiter of standard for some folks.

 

Finally, a comment was made that both editions were licensed "per two cpus". That's not correct, per the EULA (which refers to cores btw, and to find the eula, see https://coldfusion.adobe.com/2018/01/finding-the-eula-end-user-licensing-agreement-for-your-installe...).

 

First and most important, it's instead 2 for standard and *8* for enterprise. That's a big difference if you have more than 2 cores.

 

Second, this is not about how many CF "will support": it will use as many as there are. This is simply about how many there are, which controls how many licenses would be required.

So if you have an 8-core machine, you'd need to buy *4* standard licenses VS only 1 enterprise. The four Standard would cost MORE than the one Enterprise license, in which case it's no longer about whether you "need" the other advantages it offers. They'd be a bonus. 🙂

 

I don't say that to "push enterprise". To be clear, I am not a cf reseller, so I make no money based on what license people buy. I just help people weigh their options, and I help troubleshoot problems which sometimes is about licensing.

 

Indeed, fwiw, I have more often SAVED people from going to enterprise--when they feared it was the only solution to their problems, and instead we solved the problems so things worked fine even on standard. As has been said, different people have different needs of one vs the other.

 

Finally, to the OP, I will note also that you can currently buy CF2018 licenses at 25% off from the makers of FusionReactor, at https://buy.adobe-software.com.

 

And while Adobe (and resellers) always offer a discounted upgrade price to the latest version from the previous one, when cf2020 comes out, that would only be available to those who have licensed cf2018, nor to those on cf2016 or earlier.

 

Hope that's helpful.

/Charlie (server troubleshooter, carehart.org)

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Jul 30, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 30, 2020

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Charlie_Arehart: "...some misstatements or things a reader could misinterpret (partly Adobe's fault per info on some of their pages). As I discuss these things with people often in my consulting, let me elaborate.

First, regarding some things asserted here to be enterprise-only, these ARE in fact in standard:... etc."

 

Charlie, this is an inaccurate argument. You're inferring things no contributor before you said. Talk about misinterpretation!

 

No one drew a line in the sand to separate "Enterprise-only" from "Standard-only". That is, no one, until you  yourself did. 

 

An application comes together from the collaboration of many disparate software components. Therefore, to compare Standard with Enterprise - as two separate application servers - you have to consider the capability of each.

 

By capability I mean the collective resources that it offers to enable you to build a given application. From what I can see, every contributor before you thinks along these lines. 

 

Thus, Standard may have PDF, server monitoring, threading, gateways and APIs, but Standard won't be any good if you want to build an application that makes elaborate use of any one of these resources, let alone a combination of them. Altascene has given a PDF example. Another example: you cannot build a fully-fledged API or messaging application without the elaborate use of threads and multiple ColdFusion instances. 

 

Charlie_Arehart: "Finally, a comment was made that both editions were licensed "per two cpus". That's not correct, per the EULA (which refers to cores btw, and to find the eula, seehttps://coldfusion.adobe.com/2018/01/finding-the-eula-end-user-licensing-agreement-for-your-installe...).

First and most important, it's instead 2 for standard and *8* for enterprise. That's a big difference if you have more than 2 cores."

 

You're probably mistaken. You seem to confuse "core" with "CPU". One CPU may contain two or more cores. In any case, I got the "per 2 CPUs" and the pricing from Adobe:

 

cf2018Prcing.png

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