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Automate device RGB to Spot Color Profile

New Here ,
Feb 13, 2020 Feb 13, 2020

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I will be honest, I am not a graphic designer or in Prepress, so I don't know even where to begin. My background is programming and I have looked for a "stackoverflow" resource for print & color and hope I can find a good resource here.

 

My inquiry is 2-fold. First, I have a device RBG file (could be thousands of pages/documents) that I need to convert to a spot color profile. I can find tutorials on doing so in Illustrator, but I need something like a script that can process thousands of documents. I will attach a sample. The documents are created as individual .SVG's and then converted to a multi-page pdf for printing. I could be stupid for creating them as pdf to begin with, but as I said, I do not have the background.

 

The second part to the inquiry would be to maintain the vector nature of the .svg. The quality of print would be best if I did not rasterize my graphics, but again, I'm not sure how to get a multi-page print ready document from multiple svg's without rendering to a pdf.

 

Any help, guidance, or resources would be helpful. Thanks in advance

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Community Expert ,
Feb 13, 2020 Feb 13, 2020

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Do you mean you want to output a separate Spot color plate on an offset press? If that’s the case you would have to convert the .svg file to a format that supports spot colors—probably the best way to do that is open the .svg in Illustrator, and convert the color from Process to Spot.

 

There are no .icc spot color profiles, the color has to be explicitly designated as Spot in order to output as a separation plate. Here I’ve opened an .svg file and changed the red color to Pantone 3516 with the Color Type set as Spot

 

Screen Shot 6.png

 

If I save the file as either .ai or .pdf, the spot color plate will show in AcrobatPro, or InDesign if I place the file.

 

The .ai file placed in InDesign where I can see the Spot plate in Separation Preview

Screen Shot 7.png

 

 

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New Here ,
Feb 14, 2020 Feb 14, 2020

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Thank you for your reply Rob,

 

I think I am moving in the right direction. I have opened the svg in Illustrator and changed the stroke to a custom spot color called "DR Preferred." We aren't currently utilizing this in an offset press, but the profile is loaded into our digital presses. Here's a snap of what I have in Illustrator and Acrobat.

Image in IllustratorImage in Illustrator

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image in AcrobatImage in Acrobat

 

 

 

 

 

My question is whether this process can be automated. If I have 10,000 .svg files, I can't manipulate each file one at a time. Is there a way to create a script with a hot folder (or an additional software/plugin) that can process each file without user input? Each .svg will have variable data and I'd like to process an entire folder worth of images (or one at a time and compile a folder of print ready .pdf's) and merge all converted documents into a single 10,000 page print ready .pdf file with a single profile. Would that be unreasonable?

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Community Expert ,
Feb 14, 2020 Feb 14, 2020

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We aren't currently utilizing this in an offset press, but the profile is loaded into our digital presses.

 

Then why do you need a spot color, are you going to output a 5th plate? The only purpose of a spot color is to ouput an extra plate in a separation workflow, using spot colors and converting them for process color printing only complicates color mangement.

 

SVG is a web RGB format, so all you really have to do is make sure there is a source RGB profile assigned, which probably should be sRGB. An easy way to do that would be to place the SVGs in an InDesign CC2020 document with sRGB as the document RGB profile assignment, and then export to PDF/X-4 which will keep the source sRGB profile assigned for all of the placed art.

 

If you wanted to make a color managed conversion into a specific CMYK profile, you could with the PDF/X-4 export by setting the Output>Destination to the desired profile. Placing the SVGs in InDesign would be easy to automate.

 

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New Here ,
Feb 14, 2020 Feb 14, 2020

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The color specialists for our digital press created a profile for our Fiery and I'm told we need to have the profile embedded into the document. You are correct, it seems odd to convert RBG to spot so that a machine can then convert it to process CMYK.

 

Can I load the .icc from the Fiery into Illustrator and use it to convert the profile RGB with the correct settings? 

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Community Expert ,
Feb 15, 2020 Feb 15, 2020

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it seems odd to convert RBG to spot so that a machine can then convert it to process CMYK.

 

Right, there would be no reason to set the color to spot in a process CMYK workflow, all that would do is add an unneeded step.

 

Can I load the .icc from the Fiery into Illustrator and use it to convert the profile RGB with the correct settings?

 

The .SVG format doesn’t allow for an embedded profile, but given that it is a web format I think it is safe to assume your .svgs should get assigned the sRGB profile.

 

If you open an .svg directly into Illustrator (don’t place), it will open as RGB with no profile (Untagged RGB). In that case your current Color Settings Working Spaces manage the color. If you set the RGB Working Space to sRGB and the CMYK Space to your Fiery CMYK profile, you can make the conversion into the Fiery CMYK space by Saving As PDF/X-4:

 

Screen Shot.png

 

Screen Shot 1.png

 

Here I'm using Coated GRACol as the destination CMYK space. To make your Fiery custom profile available you’ll need to install it on your OS.

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Community Expert ,
Feb 14, 2020 Feb 14, 2020

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Or, you can do the same by placing .svg files in InDesign.

 

A placed .svg in an sRGB assigned InDesign doc

 

 

Screen Shot 23.png

 

Export to the default PDF/X-4 preset with no color conversions and the svg oject in Acrobat will inspect as profiled sRGB:

 

Screen Shot 24.png

 

Or, you can export to a specified CMYK profile, which will make the conversion to the Destination CMYK space. Set the Fiery profile as the Destination:

 

Screen Shot 25.pngScreen Shot 26.png

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