Wide Gamut Monitor and the path to Sanity

Most Valuable Participant ,
Apr 17, 2016

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Yes... this again.

I promise that when I figure this out I am going to make a killer video tutorial

about this and help everybody who is still struggling with this.

I have read dozens of articles about this and still it alludes me.

read this insane thing (you'd think that a super expert,

when talking about color management, would have mercy on our eyes...)

read this very good thing

and read posts here and everywhere. still don't get all of it.

really, what's the point of working in a color managed environment

if you can only see it "right" in some specific color managed apps

while the majority of people will see it "wrong"?

Me

I do Compositing design for video.

My Workstation:

Windows 7

DELL 2408WFP Monitor. calibrated using x-rite i1displaypro.

Software:

Photoshop CC2015

After Effects CC2015

Chrome Browser

Vlc player

My Workflow:

  • in Photoshop I work in sRGB as a working space color space: the colors look less saturated - Like I want them.
  • when I save for web and embed the color profile: the photo looks fine in Windows photo viewer - since it's color managed.
  • Browse the files in my Os Windows explorer: saturated - since it's not color managed.
  • Watch it in my Chrome browser: saturated - since it's not color managed.
  • Import it to After effects for Compositing the image: it looks saturated - unless I change the color management project settings to sRGB - then it looks fine. o.k I get it - color management.... I can do this!
  • Export a movie from After effects and watch it in the ever popular VLC player: saturated - since it's not color managed. ARRGGGG

Why Bother?

it is supposed to be on the web so people are going to watch it in Chrome since the vast majority of people watch browse in chrome

if I send it to a client he is going to see it in Chrome. the movie is going to be watched in VLC Player since it's the most popular.

so basically everybody who's anybody is going to watch that stuff as too saturated. so why bother to work in a color managed environments? for geeks who only use firefox value 1? or use designated color managed apps??? (I am a geek no offense)

and if he watches it in sRGB Monitor or an sRGBcolor space profile in his OS - it is going to be saturated.

the only way I can keep my sanity for now is to set my color management profile in windows to sRGB

now everything is consistent - too saturated. but at least it's consistent.

what do you guys think?

and another thing:

btw is there a way to use x-rite to calibrate my monitor for at least to be a decent sRGB color space?

can't see how to do that...

thanks in advance

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Apr 17, 2016 0
Community Beginner ,
May 06, 2017

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Amazing community and thanks to Roei who created this thread to help figure this out together along with so many talents.

To thedigitaldog:

Watched through your two-part youtube series about color management and it is EXTREMELY helpful. Very technical and informative. I need to take my word back on "The concept seems straight-forward..." because there are so much complexity in it I really thinks I still knows nothing about.

To D Fosse and all:

Read through all your discussions and I believe I have reached some sort of methods that I am going to approach with.

1. Treat my Dell U2410 as a specialized tool, calibrate and profile as WG should to maximize the usable color space

2. Change back the "advanced" system default profile (thanks D Fosse), and make my device default to my calibrated profile

3. Ignore Windows Photo Viewer and Windows Photo or other crappy not-color-managed apps altogether. Focus solely on LR and PS on my edits.

4. Export to Adobe RGB 1998 if I want to print physical, export to sRGB for digital usage

5. View these exported photos on a separate PC/Monitor that mimics typical unmanaged client's PC's environment.

-----

Bottom-line: with the above method, I will know the work I am working on, under my particular environment only, is as true to its color as possible. Then understand there is no way to control what clients' will see on their screen, but knows that it won't be too far off since it will all be relative to how their system behaves.

Hope this method can keep me sane for the last time.

On the other hand, still don't understand why Windows Photo Viewer's color is different from the Windows Photo? If both apps are not color managed, what gives them to behave differently in a same system?

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May 06, 2017 1
Most Valuable Participant ,
May 06, 2017

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On the other hand, still don't understand why Windows Photo Viewer's color is different from the Windows Photo? If both apps are not color managed, what gives them to behave differently in a same system?

windows photo viewer is color managed

good luck sukail77046130

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May 06, 2017 1
Community Beginner ,
May 06, 2017

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Thanks. You are right, further studying showed that WPV is color managed but Windows Photo is not. However, WPV is managed not with the profile the monitor calibrated with thus the over saturation. I found a good picture managing app that can load the same calibration profile ones calibrated, its called fastpictureviewer and the free version works great

Good luck to you too!

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May 06, 2017 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 07, 2017

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Here's how it works in Windows Photo Viewer vs. Windows Photos:

Windows Photo Viewer is fully color managed. It converts the data from the document profile into the monitor profile, and sends that off to the display. This is exactly the same as Photoshop, and if the two don't display identically, something's wrong.

Windows Photos is not color managed. It passes the document RGB values straight through, uncorrected for the display.

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May 07, 2017 1
Advisor ,
May 06, 2019

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>>windows photo viewer is color managed

yes, but (excuse that) does windows photo viewer convert/translate/correct tagged RGB to the monitor profile OR sRGB

and what happens if you open untagged RGB in windows photo viewer (it would pay to know how Windows treats untagged RGB in its process)

the last time i checked Windows was 'half' color managed (for lack of a technical term) - it converted tagged RGB to sRGB (not tagged RGB to Monitor RGB like Photoshop)

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May 06, 2019 0
Explorer ,
May 06, 2019

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thanks for your reply.

the main problem is that colors do not match inside Illustrator. Independent of any windows apps which are (most likely) not color-managed, like WIN 10 Fotos for example.

Have a look at the thread I posted above and please reply there

THX!

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May 06, 2019 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 06, 2019

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Just for the record, Windows itself doesn't do any color management at all (and isn't supposed to).

But some of the native / embedded applications do. The old "Windows Photo Viewer", in Win 7, did full and proper color management using the monitor profile. And very reliably so.

Unfortunately, the Win 10 replacement, Windows "Photos", has reverted to the ill-conceived Internet Explorer model. Here there actually is a color management engine running, but the actual monitor profile is replaced with sRGB. This, of course, ensures that it will not display correctly under any circumstances.

It seems Microsoft fired their whole color management team when the focus shifted to phones and tablets.

It doesn't have any practical significance, as long as you use other color managed apps instead. The Windows model is to let the application control color management entirely - the OS just makes profiles available as applications request them. The upside is reliability and easy troubleshooting. As long as the application gets it right, everything works. 

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May 06, 2019 1
New Here ,
Jun 08, 2017

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I too have been battling with the issue of creating web content on a wide gamut dell u27... I want to edit photos (lightroom/photoshop) in an environment that mimics what clients will see... When I export jpegs in sRGB from lightroom, there is an obvious color cast (red) to them when viewed on any device, in any program, including my monitor (which is set to sRGB mode)... On color managed or non-color managed apps alike (the various windows image viewers)! The solution I was using at first was to set the image tones with a green bias before export (very unscientific)... But then I changed the windows color management settings to standard icc sRGB (instead of the canned DELL profile) and now everything seems consistent. My exports (more or less) match what I see in LR/photoshop, in color managed and non-color managed apps alike, on multiple devices.

Obviously different devices will render the exports differently, but said differences are far more subtle now, as to be negligible.

Expert advice is duly noted, but "accuracy" is apparently impossible for consumer applications (printing aside), so makes no sense to try to achieve it. What we want then is a usable sRGB working space, and this seems to have done the trick on my monitor anyway.

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Jun 08, 2017 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 08, 2017

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flylikeazipper  wrote

When I export jpegs in sRGB from lightroom, there is an obvious color cast (red) to them when viewed on any device, in any program, including my monitor (which is set to sRGB mode)...

Test this with a color reference image who’s RGB values are correct:

http://www.digitaldog.net/files/2014PrinterTestFileFlat.tif.zip

IF you see a cast, it’s your calibration!

flylikeazipper  wrote

I want to edit photos (lightroom/photoshop) in an environment that mimics what clients will see...

That’s impossible! You can’t control what other’s see. That’s been covered here and why.

flylikeazipper  wrote

Expert advice is duly noted, but "accuracy" is apparently impossible for consumer applications (printing aside), so makes no sense to try to achieve it. What we want then is a usable sRGB working space, and this seems to have done the trick on my monitor anyway.

This really has noting to do with color accuracy. Printing or otherwise. We can go there and discuss scene referred (accurate but often ugly appearing color). Work on pleasing color.

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Jun 08, 2017 0
New Here ,
Jun 08, 2017

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Hence why I placed "accuracy" in quotations... As I don't literally mean color accuracy, but merely color that is not so obviously wrong as to be comical. It is apparent from my post that I am aware I cannot REPLICATE what others will see (especially on my Adobe98esque monitor), why I said MIMIC it, which is obviously possible because there exists a standard in sRGB, which falls well within the range of color my monitor can display.

I was writing to say that once I changed the windows profile to an ICC sRGB to match my wg monitor's crippled sRGB setting, my workflow behaves more predictably, without the red casts... DELL's generic software profile appeared to be the culprit.

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Jun 08, 2017 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 08, 2017

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You can’t mimic what you can’t control. You can’t control if people are using color managed browsers. You can’t control if they calibrate and profile their display (and how) or not. You can’t control if they are viewing your images on a circa 1995 CRT struggling to hit 60 CD/m2 or a 2017 NEC SpectraView set at 200cd/m2.

Work on calibrating your own system by viewing color reference images such they appear to preview well; that’s why they are filled with special kinds of synthetic images and other’s with memory colors like skin tones, skies, etc.

flylikeazipper  wrote

I was writing to say that once I changed the windows profile to an ICC sRGB to match my wg monitor's crippled sRGB setting, my workflow behaves more predictably, without the red casts... DELL's generic software profile appeared to be the culprit.

No, it’s not, certainly if you changed the ICC profile to the actual sRGB profile that doesn’t define your actual display.

Examine this correct text again: A monitor profile needs to be an accurate description of the monitor's actual, current behavior.

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Jun 08, 2017 1
New Here ,
Jun 08, 2017

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I guess what I'm saying is what I have accomplished is good enough for my purposes, given that what I export now looks like what I edited. I have achieved some amount of consistency within my workflow (and outside it, perhaps coincidentally?) that I did not have prior to taking those steps.

Not good enough for you, fine, but might help someone else.

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Jun 08, 2017 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 08, 2017

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You didn’t fix the issue IF you’re using an generic sRGB profile for the display profile. Now you’ve just produced wrong previews everywhere that match incorrectly and hosed color management. If you’re happy with that fact, be happy that you’re happy. But you solved absolutely nothing by having the display lie to you IF again, you simply used a generic sRGB profile instead of one built from the calibration.

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Jun 08, 2017 0
New Here ,
Jun 08, 2017

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You know they are wrong because you have calibrated my monitor and know how off it is?

By my understanding you cannot achieve perfection, only compensate within the monitor's limits as best you can... Even calibration will only get you as close as possible... My eye calibrator says it's good enough for the web, where an overwhelming proportion of viewers will see it unmanaged anyway.

Not sure how I've hosed color management... I never calibrated the monitor to begin with (long story).

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Jun 08, 2017 0
New Here ,
Jun 08, 2017

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Also I appreciate what you are saying... My monitor is definitely being dishonest with me the way I have it set up... But it is so convincing that I'm not sure it matters. When I dive into printing I will definitely calibrate, but not sure it's worth it till then.

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Jun 08, 2017 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 08, 2017

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flylikeazipper  wrote

You know they are wrong because you have calibrated my monitor and know how off it is?

I don’t think you understand how this really works (sorry). The ICC display profile is used to produce a preview in color managed applications. You cannot not have this occur. The profile you picked doesn’t define the behavior of the display. You used (if I understand you) a generic sRGB profile. It may look better. But it isn’t a reflection of the device!

This is akin to taking an image that is one stop too dark and just brightening the display using the on screen controls; do you think that’s an effective fix for a dark image? No! You know the image is 1 stop too dark because you’ve got a display that shows it too dark, then you fix the RGB values.

Was the image ‘too red’? Or the display was just too red? If you don’t care what the issue is (display preview or RGB data), if you don’t care that the resulting print looks like and just keep adjusting (blindly) edits until you get a great print, you do not need color management! Some of us want what we see and what we get to have some resemblance and we want that to occur over time (displays need to be recalibrated on a regular basis, they are unstable devices.

flylikeazipper  wrote

By my understanding you cannot achieve perfection, only compensate within the monitor's limits as best you can.

No one’s talking about perfection! And no, that’s not what calibration and profiles provide. Calibration is placing a device into a know, desired and as importantly, repeatable state. You haven’t done this. The ICC profile directly affects the preview as hopefully you’ve seen.

flylikeazipper  wrote

My eye calibrator says it's good enough for the web, where an overwhelming proportion of viewers will see it unmanaged anyway.

Not sure how I've hosed color management... I never calibrated the monitor to begin with (long story).

You didn’t calibrate anything by eye and as importantly produce a profile that defines that behavior!

You hosed color management by this fact! And I’m not the only one here who’s told you this fact. See again, the very correct statement:

A monitor profile needs to be an accurate description of the monitor's actual, current behavior.

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Jun 08, 2017 0
New Here ,
Jun 08, 2017

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Humbled, and no apologies necessary, thank you for the education! I am learning.

Back to my original problem of a red cast on exports... Was my display too red, or was it the monitor profile? I previously stated, that the red cast (on exports) was visible on multiple devices, my monitor, my android, an iphone, a TV... I also stated that with great frustration, I had been correcting for this with the method you described: by changing the tone of the image in lightroom (capture nx, photoshop etc.) where the images looked perfect, to a green bias to counteract the exported red cast...

At some point I'd had enough, because if I put my monitor on sRGB mode it should just clip the Adobe98 right out and work just fine no? No. So I did some reading. Lo and behold the Internet is awash with misinformation... So I am lost, and end up trying the standard windows sRGB ICC profile, the one thing I hadn't tried... Lo and behold it works.

I think given the evidence of the red cast of exports being apparent on ANY sRGB compliant device (including my monitor in sRGB mode!), combined w the fact that altering the visibly perfect lightroom image to make IT less red was an annoying but effective patch.... Points to the color management preview being too red, and the DELL display profile being at fault.

Never mind the fact that changing the display profile to a more conservative (though notably incorrect) choice seemingly remedied the issue. This standard ICC profile does not represent my DELL monitor as physics intended, but damn its pretty close.

I know what state the monitor is in: some kind of funky dell sRGB, I desire it because the colors are gorgeous, and its repeatable (on this monitor anyway), because I know the settings I've used (plus I think my monitor compensates for its degradation automatically or some such DELL marketing)... So until I start printing, or maybe editing on multiple monitors... I'll save some money on a calibrator.

I'll come back later on to tell you if I regret that or not.

/edit... i appreciate that my monitor in sRGB mode could be just as off, or worse than the display profile, and the only way to get them both to agree is via calibration...but I'll trust DELL's sRGB mode for now as my eye sees it working, as weak a standard as that may be.

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Jun 08, 2017 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 09, 2017

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flylikeazipper  wrote

Back to my original problem of a red cast on exports... Was my display too red, or was it the monitor profile?

As suggested earlier, you need to examine a color reference image that IS NOT too red.

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Jun 09, 2017 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 08, 2017

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You just confirmed what I wrote up in post #46:

A monitor profile needs to be an accurate description of the monitor's actual, current behavior.

If you set the monitor to the sRGB preset, then sRGB is the monitor's actual, current behavior. It's no longer a wide gamut monitor, and you can use a standard sRGB-type profile.

And really, people mystify this too much. Rather obviously, applications without color management do not do any color management. They're wrong, don't trust them. If you have a wide gamut monitor, they will just be more wrong.

Working without color management and expecting to see "what others see" is simply not possible. To do that, everybody would need to use the very same, identical monitor. The closest you can get is to use the same class of monitor that most others use, which is an sRGB-type, standard gamut unit. It won't be a perfect match, but at least you'll roughly speak the same language and be on speaking terms.

There is no reason today to work without color management for web. Fully color managed options exist for both Mac and Windows. Convert to sRGB and embed the profile, and almost any thinkable scenario is covered.

Work color managed and get the file right on your end. How people choose to set up their systems is their problem, not yours.

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Jun 08, 2017 2
Explorer ,
May 06, 2019

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Hey Guys and Girls,

i have been reading your thread till the end and have to admit that I am pretty sure I got the exact same problem as Roei Tzoref. It really strikes me as being utterly unusual to get such a behaviour inside my Adobe programs and therefore I have done some testing.

The only way for me to get synchronized and expected RGB colors and especially values is to set sRGB as the monitor's profile in the OS (Windows 10 display profile) like Roei Tzoref has been pointing out several times in this thread. Therefore, if I have correctly understood the posts above, not really making use of the color management capabilities of a wide-gamut Eizo CS240. But at least color values match between Adobe and Web and especially inside the respective Adobe Programs:

To further illustrate the testing I have done I have opened another thread which you can visit here:

Help me out please! Colors seem to show wrong after monitor calibration?

It would be interesting to get some feedback whether you guys get the same results when doing the same testing. If you DO get the same results, at least I can be assured that there is or most likely is no bug inside my Adobe programs but that it has indeed got to do something with a wrong calibration or corrupted profile.

Would love to hear from you guys.

Cya

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May 06, 2019 0
Most Valuable Participant ,
May 06, 2019

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You kind of have it. Certainly, if you set the monitor to sRGB you can just about get colour matching between your colour managed apps (Adobe) and on-colour managed apps. And, as you say, you are getting no benefit from the monitor.

Far better is to say: this is a specialist monitor which shows correct colour only in colour managed apps. I won't use those other apps, because they are not suitable for this monitor. There is no bug in any app, they are all working exactly as designed. The design isn't necessarily what we want!

I'd recommend such a monitor only for preparing work for print publishing, or as a second monitor.

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May 06, 2019 0
Explorer ,
May 06, 2019

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Hi there,

thanks for answering!

I understand that setting sRGB as monitor profile doesn't really get you any benefits from using a wide-gamut-monitor.

But if using a custom calibrated and profiled profile, values should at least match inside and among various Adobe programs, right (because they are all color managed)? I also made sure that my color management settings are all synced between Adobe programs (using Bridge).

BUT

if you take a look at the thread I have posted above, color appearance and values differ INSIDE THE SAME program, namely Adobe Illustrator.

HOW'S THAT POSSIBLE?? I CANNOT EXPLAIN 😕

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May 06, 2019 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 06, 2019

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kain, can you please keep this in one thread? Having this spread over three separate threads is completely impossible to keep track of.

Please state which of these three threads we should respond to.

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May 06, 2019 0
Most Valuable Participant ,
May 06, 2019

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just an update the thread: I eventually bought Eizo CG247X Monitor, calibrated it to sRGB, bought another Dell U2415 adjusted it to match my Eizo. I sometimes work app managed and sometimes not. everything makes sense now. I have regained sanity.

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May 06, 2019 0
Explorer ,
May 06, 2019

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Hi there Roei,

sounds good that you have regained sanity ^^.

Could you maybe elaborate a bit more on what exactly led to this?

I am just asking for a bit more information, but only if you have time for this

Cheeers!

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May 06, 2019 1
Most Valuable Participant ,
May 07, 2019

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Hey Kain, what led to this is that I had a credibility issue with my old Dell. it was showing different colors and I was not sure if it's a hardware problem or a software. turns out it was mostly a hardware problem since it was going yellow on me. but also software - because I could not calibrate it properly. the Eizo comes with a built in color calibrator and a very high reputation for color correction. I needed that kind of credibility for my clients. I then bought another Dell and I use them both. set my dell to display as best it can to my Eizo and I can now trust my monitor again to show me the right colors.

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May 07, 2019 1
Explorer ,
May 07, 2019

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Hi Roei,

thanks for elaborating in more detail

If you have time (I know it is a long post), could you maybe look at my last comment here:

Re: Help me out please! Colors seem to show wrong after monitor calibration?

and maybe tell me if I made the right assumptions or I got a wrong understanding of it all?

Would help me a lot ^^ Only if you got time for this

All the best!

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May 07, 2019 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 06, 2019

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Roei - yes, you can do that, if you need to use applications without color management.

Otherwise, purchasing a wide gamut unit and then permanently dumb it down to sRGB is a massive waste of money.

Now - one of the great advantages of Eizo ColorNavigator is that you can have several calibration targets/monitor profiles, and easily switch between them on the fly. One of these can be an sRGB emulation to be used when necessary.

The only thing you need to remember, is that every time you do this, you need to close down and relaunch any color managed application in use. The reason is that the application loads the monitor profile at startup, and then continues to use this profile for the duration of that session, even if it changes on system level. Relaunching loads the new profile.

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May 06, 2019 0
Most Valuable Participant ,
May 07, 2019

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Yes, you can do that, if you need to use applications without color management.

I do use color management sometimes, not wide gamut but sRGB. I need to do color corrections sometimes for Video and Broadcast. the wide gamut features are not important to me since I don't do print work. if I do need to, I do know I can set my Eizo to a wide gamut range.

Otherwise, purchasing a wide gamut unit and then permanently dumb it down to sRGB is a massive waste of money.

I don't agree with that statement. the Eizo is wide gamut but the thing that is most critical to me is how accurate it is for Color Correction and Grading work that is done in Rec709 or sRGB color space and I bet that's why most people who do video purchase it or the Nec's. they don't really can afford the Flanders or Sony, so they settle for these guys who can be just fine on most situations for color critical work on video.

thing you need to remember, is that every time you do this, you need to close down and relaunch any color managed application in use.

yes, I was aware after testing in the last round. thanks D!

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May 07, 2019 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 07, 2019

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https://forums.adobe.com/people/Roei Tzoref  wrote

I don't agree with that statement.

OK, you obviously know what you're doing, so that's fine.

I didn't want to get into this to avoid complicating things further - but mainly because I still think it's better to advise people on how to use wide gamut monitors properly, instead of just turning it into a standard gamut one.

But yes, the sRGB / Rec 709 emulations in ColorNavigator are extremely accurate, because at no point do they touch the native gamut limit of the monitor. And yes, you still take advantage of Eizo's extremely high general quality, which has to do with a lot more than gamut.

Among all my other calibration targets, I also have an sRGB emulation - and yes, I do use it from time to time.

But users who haven't yet learned how to handle wide gamut units shouldn't rely on it. Then they never get anywhere.

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May 07, 2019 1
Most Valuable Participant ,
May 07, 2019

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Thank you so much D for all the help here. I do generally know what I am doing as long as I am not in Wide Gamut land... it's a black hole for me and I guess if I had to do that kind of work, I would have learned it by practice.

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May 07, 2019 1
Explorer ,
Jul 06, 2019

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Roei Tzoref​ , were you able to get this resolved? I work on an Alienware m17 laptop that I BELIEVE has a 195% srgb color gamut. when i produce videos in premier pro, and then transfer them to other computers to be previewed, they are very undersatured compared to mine. is this because i have a wide color gamut display and they do not? i am so confused here and dont know how to solve this problem.

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Jul 06, 2019 0
Most Valuable Participant ,
Jul 07, 2019

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Roei Tzoref , were you able to get this resolved? I work on an Alienware m17 laptop that I BELIEVE has a 195% srgb color gamut.

Hi, yes. I set my wide gamut monitor to sRGB, and was able to get consistent results. since then I replaced my monitor and got another wide gamut monitor - Eizo, and set it's profile to sRGB since I only do video and not print work. everything is o.k.

your laptop by looking and its specs is not wide gamut but sRGB. so this is not your issue and maybe what you are experiencing is the fact that it's not calibrated properly.

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Jul 07, 2019 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 07, 2019

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Hi Tammy

you may like to try the Premier forum with this question in case another user has seen this issue

Premiere Pro

despite the previous posters comment, unless the inline reviews are wrong -it seems your laptop may actually be wide gamut [Alienware m17 (2019) - Full Review and Benchmarks ]

I'd have to say, though, that "195% of sRGB" is a hell of a gamut!

If it really is 195% of sRGB then unless there's some way of reducing the gamut to sRGB, I'd suggest it may be unusable for video or image editing.

perhaps you can solve this by plugging in a more "normal" external monitor and use that to assess colour?

from what you write it certainly seems that it may be exaggerating the colour in your files,

which means that you think they look fine, but on a correctly set up system they look desaturated. .

does video produced by others look crazy saturated on your system? I'd expect it might.

I hope this helps

if so, please do mark my reply as "helpful"

thanks

neil barstow, colourmanagement

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Jul 07, 2019 2
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 07, 2019

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https://forums.adobe.com/people/NB%2C+colourmanagement  wrote

I'd have to say, though, that "195% of sRGB" is a hell of a gamut!

Read such spec's with a grain of salt, there are several ways to produce these percentages values. The de facto standard when throwing around display gamut sizes is currently to quote the gamut area, calculated in CIE xy, relative to a reference gamut and expressed as a percentage. If the reference color gamut is unspecified, it is generally assumed to be NTSC (1953) - (which is pretty useless since it's not in use and makes things more confusing, especially for those doing video work).

Another confusing point about this figure is that it does not say what portion of the 2 gamuts overlap, so it would be possible to have a very large % gamut area, but only have a smaller portion of it actually covering the reference gamut.

At NEC they state 2 sets of figures: "Percent Area" and "Percent Coverage". More useful IMHO:

The "Percent Area" is simply the area in CIE xy of the display gamut vs the reference gamut, with no consideration of how much of the gamuts actually overlap. This value can be > 100%.

The "Percent Coverage" is the overlapping area of the 2 gamuts expressed as a percent of the total area of the reference gamut. The maximum possible value for this is 100%.

NEC generally quote both these values for AdobeRGB and sRGB, so it is easier to determine which color gamut best suits a particular application.

Using CIE xy is not ideal because it overemphasizes the greens and under emphasizes the blues. A much better way would be to use CIE u' v', but that would probably cause more confusion and make direct comparisons even more difficult.

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Jul 07, 2019 0
Explorer ,
Jul 07, 2019

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thats a good idea. i will try editing from my wifes computer and then upload to mine. i imagine it will in fact be oversaturated. although, then wouldnt other video i watch on youtube and online look super oversaturated? (which they look more colorful than other device I view them on but nothing absolutely unwatchable.)

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Jul 07, 2019 0
Advisor ,
Jul 07, 2019

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>> i will try editing from my wifes computer and then upload to mine

edit in photoshop (in the sRGB colorspace or save as for the web in sRGB as a last step)

photoshop is displaying FULLY color managed - it is the unmanaged apps (and/or missing ICC profiles) that are causing the issues- so-called wide gamut monitors only show the error more pronounced

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Jul 07, 2019 0
Explorer ,
Jul 07, 2019

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except for im talking about video production lol. soooo photoshop doesnt exactly help me. and it is my understanding that premier pro is NOT a color managed app

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Jul 07, 2019 0
Advisor ,
Jul 07, 2019

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ok my bad

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Jul 07, 2019 1
Explorer ,
Jul 07, 2019

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no worries man! appreciate the input though!

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