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How do you install Creative Cloud on Ubuntu 20.04?

New Here ,
Sep 28, 2020

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I know Adobe will never support Linux - they don't care about the people who want to use it over Windows or Mac - but I am looking for a guide to install it on the latest version of Ubuntu 20.04. 

 

I have been having so many problems with Windows it's about to make me go crazy. Microsoft pushed a huge "upgrade" that has only made things worse. Windows has been giving me internet issues and I keep getting errors while trying to use the Adobe programs, like Illustrator, but most especially Acrobat DC. 

 

If I can use Ubuntu at least half of the time or more, then it will save me a lot of headaches. 

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How do you install Creative Cloud on Ubuntu 20.04?

New Here ,
Sep 28, 2020

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I know Adobe will never support Linux - they don't care about the people who want to use it over Windows or Mac - but I am looking for a guide to install it on the latest version of Ubuntu 20.04. 

 

I have been having so many problems with Windows it's about to make me go crazy. Microsoft pushed a huge "upgrade" that has only made things worse. Windows has been giving me internet issues and I keep getting errors while trying to use the Adobe programs, like Illustrator, but most especially Acrobat DC. 

 

If I can use Ubuntu at least half of the time or more, then it will save me a lot of headaches. 

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Sep 28, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 28, 2020

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Quote:

I have been having so many problems with Windows it's about to make me go crazy.

End Quote:

 

Then you have computer hardware problems.

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Sep 28, 2020 1
New Here ,
Sep 29, 2020

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I see.. so are you a computer technician? What version of Windows are you using that makes you so confident to declare it is a hardware problem and nothing to do with Windows? Whatever version you are using I would like to use.... 

 

My computer just upgraded to the 2004 version and since then it has had more issues than before. It is not uncommon for Windows to have various issues from BSODs, driver issues, network issues, etc. after updates and it is not the hardware's fault - and this is fact that has been reported in the news and on countless websites and forums. That said, I do not understand how you can declare it to be a hardware issue and nothing to do with Windows. 

 

When Windows rolls out an update and stops working right, I was wanting to be able to use Ubuntu as a backup so that I can keep working without wasting an entire day dealing with trying to fix Windows.

 

I could of course turn off the Windows Updates, which might solve the problem for a while, but then if they have some sort of security patch I may fail to install it, and the number of updates I would need to install later would become too numerous and time consuming to do after a while. 

 

I am going to wipe the hard drive and reinstall everything. A most time consuming task that I do not particularly enjoy doing because of the amount of data I have to move and the time it takes to reinstall everything. 

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Sep 29, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 29, 2020

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Yes and No.

 

I have been building my own systems for over 20 years. The system I am on right now I built in 2011. It is overclocked and I have never had a BSOD. 16GBs RAM, SSD, multiple spinning HDD.

I originally had a i5 CPU in it and then about 5 years ago upgrade it to a i7 CPU.

 

Windows 10 Pro V 1909.

I do not run any AV or internet security programs. IMHO all they do is SUCK resources and cause problems. Never had a virus in all the years I have been using a computer.

 

 

 

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New Here ,
Sep 29, 2020

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Wow, that's really amazing. I have the home version of Windows 10. Maybe the Pro version is better? Maybe I need to get the Pro version instead... 

 

Do you use any maintenance programs - like clearing the cache, etc.? I'm curious what programs you use if you do that. You seem to have a really cool setup.

 

And that is impressive you don't use any AV or internet security programs.. thinking about it... it's possible one of the programs I have been using has corrupted some files or something and the update only made things worse. I got it when my computer was running incredibly slow and it helped to speed it up. 

 

When I reinstall everything, I was seriously considering not installing the same programs, but only the essential ones. Some hardware upgrades like getting an SSD would probably help, and a new graphics card.  What graphics card do you use? 

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Most Valuable Participant ,
Sep 28, 2020

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You may install on Windows or Mac... not any variation of Linux

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Sep 28, 2020 1
New Here ,
Sep 29, 2020

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Based on your response, I assume you aren't a linux user. How do you know that to be true? People have installed it on linux in the past, so why would it be impossible or not allowed now? Has Adobe made it impossible to now? 

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Sep 29, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 29, 2020

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AFAIK Adobe has never released a version of any of their software for Linux.
If people have installed some Adobe software on Linux then they have uses a Windows Emulator of one type or another or Windows in a Virtual Machine to do that.

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Sep 29, 2020 1
New Here ,
Sep 29, 2020

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Indeed I also had problems trying to install the adobe on linux!

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Adobe Employee ,
Sep 29, 2020

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To add to John and Just Shoot Me's response the desktop applications that are included in an individual Creative Cloud membership are designed to run on Windows or macOS.  For up to date information on the requirements to utilize our desktop applications please see https://helpx.adobe.com/creative-cloud/system-requirements.html.

 

If you are attempting to use Linux as the host operating system, then please expect to encounter problems and to receive no support in Adobe forums or from our support team.  You will need to be using a computer that meets the minimum system requirements, for the app or the Creative Cloud desktop app, to receive assistance.  If this is not possible, then please use the process listed in http://helpx.adobe.com/x-productkb/policy-pricing/cancel-membership-subscription.html to cancel your membership until you do have access to a computer that meets the minimum system requirements.

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New Here ,
Sep 29, 2020

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Hi, thanks for the links the input. I know the programs aren't designed for Linux and there wouldn't be support from Adobe and it'd probably have issues. That's how it is with Linux lol, that should be the motto for it. It's not uncommon to have issues trying to run programs designed for a different OS, that's the nature of Linux.

 

I wasn't asking the question expecting an easy, problem-free install and use of the Adobe programs on Linux - that'd be nice, but I know that your company wants to make money and developing for Linux would not be worth the investment of time and resources.. which I can respect.. though it does suck. That said.. I fully expect issues if I do manage to install it and I wouldn't expect any help from Adobe unless they expressly supported it, which I know they do not. 

 

My thinking was if in the event I have a huge Windows related problem again that I can't immediately fix, then I would have the ability to at least use some of the basic functions of the programs running it on Ubuntu - using Ubuntu as an occasional backup just so I could keep working.

 

Time is money and my computer (which meets the system requirements) has had serious issues lately and it prevented me from working for several hours - which is devastating when trying to do work and meet deadlines. I'm just trying to prevent having to tell my clients "sorry, my computer is having technical problems and I can't work on your project which you need done immediately right now.." so as you can imagine, it's really bad for business. 

 

I love the Adobe programs which is why I have a subscription and I want to keep using it. 

 

I just realized something.. Adobe does build for Linux - there are a few Adobe Android apps and Android is based on Linux! This may solve my real problem - not to install it on Ubuntu, but to be able to still use some of the programs through another means if/when my Windows computer has issues again. 

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