which of these adobe e-mail adresses are real and which are spam / scam etc.?

Explorer ,
Jul 04, 2016

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hey folks,

i recently got some emails which were marked as possibly being phishing mails.

so i searched my mail folder for "adobe" and got lot of different emai adresses as a result. now the question is if some of them are not adobe official.

here we go:

demand@info.adobesystems.com

AdobeResearch@mapsnet.com

info@adobe-direct.com

AdobeCommunication@adobe-emea.com

message@adobe.com

noreply@adobelightroom.com

events-dach@adobe-emea.com

events@adobe-emea.com

AdobeConnection@adobe-emea.com

support_noreply@adobe.com

is read somewhere that official mails only end on adobe.com but not really sure wether that's true or not.

greetings

marco

Most Valuable Participant
Correct answer by Test Screen Name | Most Valuable Participant

It is really vital not to use email addresses to check if an email is genuine, as they are so easy to fake it isn’t even real hacking. So asking for a list is pointless and dangerous. Also, even if Adobe are sending out intentional emails, this is exactly what a good phishing email does; take a real email and change one link. Use the normal caution and NEVER FOLLOW LINKS IN AN EMAIL you didn’t trigger. 

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which of these adobe e-mail adresses are real and which are spam / scam etc.?

Explorer ,
Jul 04, 2016

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hey folks,

i recently got some emails which were marked as possibly being phishing mails.

so i searched my mail folder for "adobe" and got lot of different emai adresses as a result. now the question is if some of them are not adobe official.

here we go:

demand@info.adobesystems.com

AdobeResearch@mapsnet.com

info@adobe-direct.com

AdobeCommunication@adobe-emea.com

message@adobe.com

noreply@adobelightroom.com

events-dach@adobe-emea.com

events@adobe-emea.com

AdobeConnection@adobe-emea.com

support_noreply@adobe.com

is read somewhere that official mails only end on adobe.com but not really sure wether that's true or not.

greetings

marco

Most Valuable Participant
Correct answer by Test Screen Name | Most Valuable Participant

It is really vital not to use email addresses to check if an email is genuine, as they are so easy to fake it isn’t even real hacking. So asking for a list is pointless and dangerous. Also, even if Adobe are sending out intentional emails, this is exactly what a good phishing email does; take a real email and change one link. Use the normal caution and NEVER FOLLOW LINKS IN AN EMAIL you didn’t trigger. 

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Jul 04, 2016 0
Adobe Employee ,
Jul 04, 2016

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Hi Marco,

Please refer to the Prevent Phishing | Adobe Security  document as it would help you maintain the security of your products.

Hope that helps!

Regards,

Sheena

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Jul 04, 2016 1
New Here ,
Mar 01, 2020

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Does Adobe want us to send in the email messages we suspect are fake?  I just got one with the subject, Why we need your phone number.  Is that legitimate?

It came from mail@email.adobe.com

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Mar 01, 2020 0
New Here ,
Apr 19, 2020

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I also got an email from this adress. Do you already know if it is real? 

I got the message that my account is going to be disabled. 

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Apr 19, 2020 0
Most Valuable Participant ,
Apr 19, 2020

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As I already said, you CANNOT TELL if an email is genuine by looking at any part of it, because everything is easy to fake. But it could be genuine. It's a big problem for everyone. If you suspect your account may be about to expire, sign in to your account and check what the email says. DON'T FOLLOW ANY LINK IN THE EMAIL.

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Apr 19, 2020 1
New Here ,
Aug 17, 2017

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Is there an updated version of this page? The link above leads to page not found.

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Aug 17, 2017 0
Most Valuable Participant ,
Aug 17, 2017

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Since the link that https://forums.adobe.com/people/Sheena%20Kaul  provided is broken, I would use Google for the part of each address after the @ sign to see if you can find anything

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Aug 17, 2017 0
Adobe Employee ,
Aug 17, 2017

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Alex, please see Phishing | Security @ Adobe

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Aug 17, 2017 0
New Here ,
Mar 12, 2018

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No, the phishing URL above does not help. Do you own adobesystems.com or not? What about the remainder of the URLs asked above? Whois says you do, but the tips in your anti-phishing campaign make me want to call it spam

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Mar 12, 2018 4
New Here ,
Mar 15, 2018

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I agree noodlesbrunch. It’s a simple yes or no question, why no answer?

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Mar 15, 2018 4
Community Beginner ,
Jul 06, 2018

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I also got an email from :

adobeemea@info.adobesystems.com

with only the text 'test' in the subject and in the message.

Got no clear answer from the chat-employee whether the mail came from Adobe or not....

For security reasons I changed my password and activated 2-pass authentication now..

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Jul 06, 2018 1
Community Beginner ,
Jul 06, 2018

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Landed on this page because of exactly the same e-mail.

Together with the plain 'test' message, it appears to contain a link to a small image through a unique ID, indicating the server if the mail has been displayed... See the complete email-source.

I don't like this at all!!!

Could someone please from Adobe confirm or deny being the origin of this mail?

Return-Path: <adobeemea@info.adobesystems.com>

Delivered-To: ###@#####.###

Received: from mdaproxy1.mail.transip.nl ([149.210.149.54])

  by webhosting66.transip.nl with LMTP id GCyqDG4CP1uWNQEAlEtrJQ

  for <###@#####.###>; Fri, 06 Jul 2018 07:47:26 +0200

Received: from mx7.mail.transip.nl ([149.210.149.114])

  by mdaproxy1.mail.transip.nl (Dovecot) with LMTP id RAbMDs4yOVvPYwAACHmHpw

  ; Fri, 06 Jul 2018 05:47:26 +0000

Received: from r56.p26.neolane.net (r56.info.adobesystems.com [66.117.17.56])

  by mx7.mail.transip.nl (Postfix) with ESMTP id 41MNzJ6xYJz1JCL0

  for <###@#####.###>; Fri,  6 Jul 2018 07:47:24 +0200 (CEST)

DKIM-Signature: v=1; a=rsa-sha256; c=relaxed/relaxed;

  s=neolane2;

  d=info.adobesystems.com;

  h=domainkey-signature:from:date:subject:to:reply-to:mime-version:x-mailer:message-id:tenantheader:affinity:content-type:content-transfer-encoding;

  bh=gQECmfafCMPfH+KyvjvYrfeeafs+/Sh+PFmssm+l9vw=;

  b=UvijEroIVkR5VZXQauN/vEutcJsh++PLnIE9JkmRRr2d4ohQ51vj8HFs4ltEXiTC2J6+FprluOwcx1T+uNkWJzSIJcTAWWAykCgAL5SoW3RCRxuHPyK+Gdk0yS+s08b8drCL6sqZLWfMIHB0MIJVG7a57pPvSpWTEl9qk5ip/9U=

DomainKey-Signature: a=rsa-sha1; c=nofws; q=dns;

  s=neolane2;

  d=info.adobesystems.com;

  h=From:Date:Subject:To:Reply-To:MIME-Version:X-mailer:Message-ID:TenantHeader:Affinity:Content-Type:Content-Transfer-Encoding;

  b=BdIooBtmzPN2gP123v3b2H8bTtpdxd0PtxYeN9zljvK9fEEGTpnxDwN1LPrJZWVIY77+gj3seU3/Y82FhBLI4JhaciKl2iNK7/VFVPbvXwlWQ9iBGretQqeLRKFkd9Ui9+QmHSXNSZNWi5DREMvV33uwZvplOjY+E594pdvVz60=

From: "Adobe Systems" <adobeemea@info.adobesystems.com>

Date: Fri, 06 Jul 2018 06:47:22 +0100

Subject: test

To: <###@#####.###>

Reply-To: "Adobe Systems" <adobeemea@info.adobesystems.com>

MIME-Version: 1.0

X-mailer: nlserver, Build 6.7.0

Message-ID: <NM619F25F1E018F5993adbeemea_mid@info.adobesystems.com>

TenantHeader: f2467142-a2f3-4c2f-aad6-f2a81836f587

Affinity: mid.default

Content-Type: text/html;

  charset="windows-1252"

Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

X-Report-Abuse-To: abuse@transip.nl

X-Spam-Flag: NO

X-Spam-Score: 0.00

X-TransIP-Original-To: ###@#####.###

X-Scanned-By: ClueGetter at mx7.mail.transip.nl

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">

<HTML><HEAD>

</HEAD>

<BODY>

<P>test</P><img height=3D'0' width=3D'0' alt=3D'' src=3D'http://t-info.mail=

.adobe.com/r/=3Fid=3Dh21215e97,991d5835,1'/><img height=3D'0' width=3D'0' a=

lt=3D'' src=3D'https://adobe.demdex.net/event=3Fc_syncplacement=3Demail&d_c=

id=3D813%015e4f1d3d41c8649499201674'/></BODY></HTML>

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Jul 06, 2018 2
New Here ,
Jun 21, 2019

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The Phishing | Security @ Adobe link provided above is not much use. There should be a contact info where I can send phishing mails to so you can check that out and try to stop it. At least that is what I had hoped for. There also should be a list where I can find official and phishing emails like someone mentioned above. This super general info blah doesn't help anyone who is older than 14. It also looks more like an advertising page for adobe and what cool projects they participate in. Well cool! That doesn't help me one bit! There is like one million Infos not about phishing on a link that says "phishing". Fantastic!

I also got an email from message@adobe.com asking me to participate in some resource. It looks quite official..

I put a screenshot here looks like phishing coming from message@adobe.com - Album on Imgur

And sorry for leaving my anger here. I know that the person reading this is not responsible! It just feels like adobe rests too much on their Iron throne of Creative Suite monopoly.

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Jun 21, 2019 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 21, 2019

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If the mail is coming from adobe.com, it is legit, but email addresses may be spoofed so you still need to be careful about links in ​any​ message, especially when they are coming in unsolicited. Also: When a system is compromised, that system may send out mails that look correct, coming from the correct person, but they are not what they pretend to be...

Regards, Abambo
Hard- and Software Engineer and Photographer.

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Jun 21, 2019 1
Most Valuable Participant ,
Mar 01, 2020

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It is really vital not to use email addresses to check if an email is genuine, as they are so easy to fake it isn’t even real hacking. So asking for a list is pointless and dangerous. Also, even if Adobe are sending out intentional emails, this is exactly what a good phishing email does; take a real email and change one link. Use the normal caution and NEVER FOLLOW LINKS IN AN EMAIL you didn’t trigger. 

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Mar 01, 2020 1
New Here ,
Jun 25, 2020

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I don't want to go ahead and just presume the OP's meaning behind the questioning, though that said I don't agree with Abambo initial sentence, even though it seems he does attempt to further elaborate that just having/knowing that's their real email may not simply be enough to determine whether the received email is real or not.  But personally for me and I'm sure many others, asking if the email is legit, is at least the very basic first step/check of whether to immediately delete/junk/report the email or not to quickly weed out the obviously bad attempts at phishing.  So it wouldn't and shouldn't be a justification to accept the email as real and in turn as safe but rather one to instead determine if it is fake and in turn potentially unsafe/phishing.

 

Why because sometimes some of these official emails are just as annoying but also sometimes helpful, where you may not remember signing up for it or know exactly how you did.  So spending time searching for the same information given in the email, isn't always so straight forward cut & dry as it seems.  Where knowing if whether an email is fake or not could be potentially even more helpful than knowing if it's real.  That instead of going to look for that information, you don't end up wasting your time trying to find something that either doesn't exist or you can simply determine whether further looking into it whether it's real or not may be worth some of your time at some point.  Also especially even more if you just want to unsubscribe to a certain email list or chain you're getting but may want future emails on other information from the real sender.  Trust me I've seen legit companies have multiple email lists with multiple options on different platforms, it's not always easy to keep up with.  So you start looking and sometimes it's intuitive and other times, it's not so straightforward as it seems.

 

As a rebuttal argument, I'm not sure if this is the main reason but I guess there may also be some hesitation of saying if an email is real or not and someone using that as justification to open links in it or maybe if phishers knowing which emails are real or not then use those in their emails.  Though the latter point, while very much a possibility, it has already been determined that there are already ones who do that anyway so it's going to happen one way or the other.  But just to be fair, if they didn't want to share a list or say what emails are real, then at the very least if someone possibly shared a list showing what emails have been reported that as fake, most users that go this far to even look for this information can either add it to a blacklist or quickly know not to trust it.  Furthermore, since those types of email/phishers obviously may not put in as much effort as some of the ones who are more detailed oriented or even also as likely may just be only looking to get the people who wouldn't even think to check in the first place.

 

So in short your presumption of why a list is pointless is not entirely correct for many of the people looking for one.  Yes, it may be dangerous for the people who are doing so for the wrong reason or use it incorrectly, but quite frankly so are many other things that are of much greater danger with less room for error but yet people are still trusted enough to make the right decision based on the information given to them.  You just have to weigh the cost vs benefit of those cases and make a decision based off that.  So yeah I think maybe just having a list that shows good vs bad emails by itself may not be the way to go but maybe have one available with the detailed and correct information above of how it should be used and how they should look at emails might be a better alternative.  If someone disregards that information/warning, there is not much you can do about that but at the same time there very much is a chance that same person may not have listened to your original point anyway and clicked a link in the email without a 2nd thought.

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Jun 25, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 25, 2020

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Always assume the email is fake even if it looks real.  Spoofing tricks people into thinking it's real.  That's the whole point of spoofing.  You can't tell fakes from real ones. 

 

Your secure Adobe account portal is available 24/7 as is online chat.  Please log-in to your account below to check order status, view invoices, change passwords/e-mails, ensure your payment details are current, etc...   DO NOT SHARE your log-in details with anyone.
https://account.adobe.com/plans

If you still need help, scroll down to Contact Adobe on the same page and use the secure & private online chat system.  Or pick up the phone M-F during normal business hours in your region. 

https://www.adobe.com/about-adobe/contact.html

 

EMAIL IS NOT SECURE.

 

===========
Beware of fake Adobe reps who may contact you privately offering to sell you software or take control of your computer. It's a scam, run away!
=============
3 Easy Ways to Identify Genuine Adobe Staff
https://tinyurl.com/10791730

 

Nancy O'Shea, ACP
Alt-Web Design & Publishing

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Jun 25, 2020 0