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Using Dreamweaver 2023 for inline styling

Contributor ,
Jun 23, 2023 Jun 23, 2023

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These days I mostly use Dreamweaver 2023 for inline styling in other files.

 

I forget the html syntax and css sometimes when I just want to add a snippet of inline styling to a CMS doc for example.  So, I would like to be able to just go to Design View and use the non code styling UI to create what I need and then copy the code to paste elsewhere.

 

I can't find the UI toolbar that lets me do this.  I just need to be able to select the text and change color, font, size, etc.

 

Thank you.

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correct answers 1 Correct answer

Community Expert , Jun 26, 2023 Jun 26, 2023
quote

if Dreamweaver has a setting whereby you can enter all of the text for a file in Design View and make multiple changes to properties like you might do in a word processing application.  And then switch to Code View to copy the inline HTML and paste it into a CMS code block

By @JohnnyAir

 

Yes, @JohnnyAir it's exactly as you describe it, you work in Design view mode, you select your text, or the portions of it that need to be modified, and from the property inspector, Ctrl F3, CSS and/or HTML t

...

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Community Expert ,
Jun 23, 2023 Jun 23, 2023

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Will this help?

https://youtu.be/M130QueMOtU

 

Wappler, the only real Dreamweaver alternative.

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Community Expert ,
Jun 24, 2023 Jun 24, 2023

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Window > CSS Designer (Shift + F11).

 

The syntax for inline tag styles is actually very simple.

<div style="property: values; property: values; property: values">

<p>Content goes here...</p>

</div>

 

Font-family, font-size and color are expressed like this example:

<div style="font-family: Tahoma, Arial, Helvetica, Sans-serif; font-size: 1.25rem; color: tomato">

<p>Content goes here...</p>

</div>

 

CSS Properties Reference:

https://www.w3schools.com/cssref/index.php

 

Hope that helps.

 

Nancy O'Shea— Product User, Community Expert & Moderator
Alt-Web Design & Publishing ~ Web : Print : Graphics : Media

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Contributor ,
Jun 24, 2023 Jun 24, 2023

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Thanks for that Nancy.

I guess that I was wondering out loud if Dreamweaver has a setting whereby you can enter all of the text for a file in Design View and make multiple changes to properties like you might do in a word processing application.  And then switch to Code View to copy the inline HTML and paste it into a CMS code block

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Community Expert ,
Jun 26, 2023 Jun 26, 2023

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quote

if Dreamweaver has a setting whereby you can enter all of the text for a file in Design View and make multiple changes to properties like you might do in a word processing application.  And then switch to Code View to copy the inline HTML and paste it into a CMS code block

By @JohnnyAir

 

Yes, @JohnnyAir it's exactly as you describe it, you work in Design view mode, you select your text, or the portions of it that need to be modified, and from the property inspector, Ctrl F3, CSS and/or HTML tabs, you apply the desired changes, depending on whether it's visual or structural... then you just have to copy the generated code to paste it into WP for example.

 

Lena_0-1687800590513.png

 

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Contributor ,
Jun 26, 2023 Jun 26, 2023

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Thank you Lena.  That's it.  Hidden in plain sight.

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Community Expert ,
Jun 26, 2023 Jun 26, 2023

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What you want is an onboard style editor in your CMS site. Ask your developer to create one for you. 

 

 

Nancy O'Shea— Product User, Community Expert & Moderator
Alt-Web Design & Publishing ~ Web : Print : Graphics : Media

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Community Expert ,
Jun 26, 2023 Jun 26, 2023

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What you want is an onboard style editor in your CMS site. Ask your developer to create one for you. 

By @Nancy OShea

 

It's not really necessary, as far as WP is concerned, everything will depend on the template you use... but natively WP already comes with a fairly complete text editor, but many templates offer a version better adapted to the internal styles proposed by the visual identity.

 

That's why it's sometimes simpler to use a DW-type tool to generate in-line code, even if this is counterproductive to the template's visual identity.

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Community Expert ,
Jun 27, 2023 Jun 27, 2023

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That's why it's sometimes simpler to use a DW-type tool to generate in-line code, even if this is counterproductive to the template's visual identity.

By @L e n a

==========

Exactly why smart admins set their CMS sites to ignore code input from non-admins.  It preserves continuity of site styles and prevents rogue CMS users from possibly destabilizing the site with spurious code input.

 

Nancy O'Shea— Product User, Community Expert & Moderator
Alt-Web Design & Publishing ~ Web : Print : Graphics : Media

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Contributor ,
Jun 27, 2023 Jun 27, 2023

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I'm the site builder and I'm mostly talking about creating WP Pages here rather than Posts.  I don't make code options available to users who don't have Admin or Editor privileges.

Also I find that when I'm playing around with styling options it's better to be able to do it in DW for example than in the WP app.

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Community Expert ,
Jun 27, 2023 Jun 27, 2023

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What you do now has consequences later.  Modern web design preaches keeping content separate from styles for performance reasons.  Inline styles are messy, verbose and can adversely impact page performance because inline styles are not cached as stylesheets are.  It creates more overhead for users to load.

 

I think you should learn to properly use WordPress Child Themes. You're not doing youreself or anyone any favors with inline code.  Adding custom CSS from the dashboard is preferred over adding it to HTML.

https://www.hostinger.com/tutorials/wordpress-custom-css

 

Nancy O'Shea— Product User, Community Expert & Moderator
Alt-Web Design & Publishing ~ Web : Print : Graphics : Media

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Contributor ,
Jun 27, 2023 Jun 27, 2023

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What you do now has consequences later.  Modern web design preaches keeping content separate from styles for performance reasons.  Inline styles are messy, verbose and can adversely impact page performance because inline styles are not cached as stylesheets are.  It creates more overhead for users to load.

 

I think you should learn to properly use WordPress Child Themes. You're not doing youreself or anyone any favors with inline code.  Adding custom CSS from the dashboard is preferred over adding it to HTML.


I use Child Themes (usually Enfold) if I'm building in WP.  I use their Quick CSS if I think that the style needs to go into the stylesheet.  If I want to make a simple change to a property within a Page that is unlikely to be used anywhere else I use inline.  If I subsequently discover that I will use this elsewhere I create a class and add it to a stylesheet.  Do you never use inline styling?

 

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Community Expert ,
Jun 28, 2023 Jun 28, 2023

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If I want to make a simple change to a property within a Page that is unlikely to be used anywhere else I use inline.  If I subsequently discover that I will use this elsewhere I create a class and add it to a stylesheet. 

By @JohnnyAir

 

I completely understand your approach, and it's true that here at the studio, I confess, we sometimes do the same.

In the rare cases where we add style on the fly, we add the following comment to the style

 

/*PEM*/

 

PEM stands for Puce et Média, our non lucrative's association 😉

In this way, if necessary, it's much easier to retrieve from an SQL query directly in the POST table

 

...LIKE '%PEM%'

 

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Contributor ,
Jun 28, 2023 Jun 28, 2023

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PEM eh?  I'll do that.

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Community Expert ,
Jun 28, 2023 Jun 28, 2023

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Glad to see it inspires you. Sorry, I didn't add this comment until after the fact, so I don't know if you noticed it, but PEM stands for Puce et Média, our non lucrative's association 😉

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