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Setting up a link to newsletters

New Here ,
Apr 20, 2020

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I have 30 separate newsletters I want to include on my site.  They are all PDF files.  Page length runs from 6 to 10 pages per newsletter.  Obviously it is better to id the newsletter by Date - say Jan 2018.. Click on the date and the newsletter pops up.  How do i do this?  What format must the files be saved in.?

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Setting up a link to newsletters

New Here ,
Apr 20, 2020

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I have 30 separate newsletters I want to include on my site.  They are all PDF files.  Page length runs from 6 to 10 pages per newsletter.  Obviously it is better to id the newsletter by Date - say Jan 2018.. Click on the date and the newsletter pops up.  How do i do this?  What format must the files be saved in.?

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Apr 20, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 20, 2020

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A link to a file is the same as any other link.

<a href="path/jan_2018.pdf">January 2018 (PDF, 256K)</a>

 

PDF is not a web compatible file type though.  While some browsers have native PDF viewers, they fall way short of expectation in many key areas.  For example, support for interactive elements is non-existent.  For best experience, users need to download & open the PDF files directly in Acrobat Pro DC or free Acrobat Reader which they may not have. 

 

If your PDFs contain no media, forms or other interactive elements, why not just convert them to HTML?  It's much simpler for everyone.

 

Nancy O'Shea, ACP
Alt-Web.com

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Apr 20, 2020 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 21, 2020

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"For example, support for interactive elements is non-existent."

That statement was absolutely true a couple of years ago, but the browser makers have been updating them at a pretty decent clip regarding PDFs. Interactive content that was missing, things like functional links or fillable forms, have made it into the browsers in the years since native support was introduced. Even Microsoft has been performing their due diligence regarding updates to their PDF viewer.

While everything might not be available in all of them yet, they're far from the "avoid at all costs" versions we started with. 

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Apr 21, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 21, 2020

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I admit browser APIs have come a long way in recent years.  But they still fall way short with .gov forms that were poorly built in LiveCycle Designer. 

 

Nancy O'Shea, ACP
Alt-Web.com

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