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adobe flash player Windows 10

New Here ,
Oct 02, 2017 Oct 02, 2017

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The pop up screen to allow or deny info on storage won’t go away on screen or accept an answer. What do I do?

Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10

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Adobe Employee ,
Oct 03, 2017 Oct 03, 2017

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This generally happens because you've disabled the ability for Flash content to store data locally.  This is generally the result of some article or well-meaning advice about protecting your privacy, but that advice isn't particularly good in the context of 2017.

The reason that this prompt is ignoring your clicks, is because as a browser plug-in, it's not always clear to us that the security dialog that you're authorizing is actually the top-most visible thing in the browser window.  We don't want malicious content to obscure the dialog and trick you into authorizing things that you can't actually see (i.e. clickjacking), so we basically take a screenshot of the area and compare it to what we expect to be displayed.  If they match, great.  If not, we assume the worst and do nothing.  This typically breaks down when there's stuff moving behind the dialog, like video or animation.

The easiest way to work around it is to set the local storage preferences back to the default of "Allow sites to store information on this computer", and use your browser's private browsing mode when you don't want data to persist beyond the immediate browsing session.  In the context of 2017, the guidance about protecting your privacy by simply disabling Flash Player's local storage objects is at best grossly incomplete, and in practice, totally ineffective.  The mechanisms by which marketers to track your behavior have long been supplanted by native HTML and JavaScript capabilities, as well as completely server-side techniques over which you have no control.

If you want the gory details, the following scholarly paper is a pretty thorough assessment of the current landscape: https://www.ftc.gov/system/files/documents/public_comments/2015/10/00064-98109.pdf

Long story short, if you want to avoid this, the best way is to just avoid the dialog popping up in the first place.

To enable local storage again, simply go to Settings / Control Panel > Flash Player > Storage, and choose Allow sites to store information on this computer.

When you want meaningful privacy protections, use the browser's private browsing mode.  For more meaningful production, use it in tandem with a commercial VPN service for anonymity in the face of server-side tracking techniques (and ISPs that can now record and sell data about your browsing habits -- you can thank your congressperson for that twist). 

This approach will allow content to store data locally (which allows content to operate normally instead of encountering errors when attempting to store data), but it's stored to a temporary location that's destroyed when you exit the browsing session.  The browser's private browsing mode also largely addresses similar mechanisms provided by HTML and JavaScript, and the VPN service helps with server-side tracking.

Hope that helps.

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