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flash player working for 30 secs in evenings???

New Here ,
May 06, 2018 May 06, 2018

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So we have 4 basically identical computers.

win10 (pro)
lots of cpu/ram etc
1 computer though wount run videos in the evening, and nothing is different..?? whats going on?

it works all day long(where we actually rarely use the computers) and in the evening it just dosnt work... wtf?
All log files says its adobe which chrashes no matter the browser(we tried the shit of browsers)...

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New Here ,
May 06, 2018 May 06, 2018

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xtra info:
It is only when viewing HBO Nordic movies/series and nothing else at all... everything else that uses flash works even simultaniusly...
its only in the evening(after 20:00H) and only that one particular computer... it dosnt compute what so ever.

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Adobe Employee ,
May 07, 2018 May 07, 2018

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It's some kind of network issue, most likely beyond your direct control.

YouTube has a great explanation of the general problem space, here:

https://www.google.com/get/videoqualityreport/#how_video_gets_to_you

Google and HBO Nordic operate different networks, but the principles are the same.

Possibilities include things like:

  • The route from your internet service provider to HBO Nordic's video servers is congested during peak viewing hours
  • You're doing lots of things simultaneously on your home network at night, which creates congestion between your home and your internet service provider.
  • Wireless interference from devices in and/or near your home create congestion on the available radio bandwidth used for wireless communication between your router and your devices

You can start by connecting a computer, via an ethernet cable, directly to your modem/router.  If the video quality improves, it's a problem inside your home network.  If not, it's a problem between your home and HBO's servers, and that's about where your visibility into the problem ends.

If you have access to a VPN service with endpoints in your country, you could try using that.  If the video connection improves over VPN, it's because the route between your ISP and HBO Nordic can't support the amount of traffic that's traveling that route.  You'll need to complain to your ISP about their poor peering, or switch ISPs to one that is better peered with the services you care about.

If the VPN service doesn't help, but you're getting sufficient throughput otherwise, then it's possible that HBO Nordic is struggling with network capacity, at which point, you should complain to HBO Nordic.  It's probably helpful to document times and routes that the traffic takes (using the traceroute utility, etc.) in order to help their network engineers better understand where they may want to invest.

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Adobe Employee ,
May 07, 2018 May 07, 2018

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Actually, I just re-read your original post and didn't catch the bit about it crashing, which is bizarre.

A couple things come to mind.

There's this classic story about a company where their computer crashed every morning at 9:15.  Turns out that it shared the same circuit with mechanical equipment that was on a timer, and the electrical noise on the circuit caused the computer to behave erratically, in a super consistent way.  Putting the computer on a UPS or moving it to a different circuit might isolate it from electrical noise.  If you move it to a circuit where other computers are behaving normally and the problem goes away, then a UPS (Uninterruptable Power Supply) is a pretty cheap and effective way to clean up power going to that computer.

Microwave Ovens interfere with other microwave signals, like WiFi networks.  If your problem computer is closer to your neighbor's house/apartment than the others and they consistently microwave dinner in the evening, that might create adverse network conditions for one of your computers.  Similarly, if they're close to you and using up lots of wireless bandwidth, that may impact your connectivity.  If the other computers are wired and this one isn't, or they're all wireless but have better reception with the router, that might explain the issue.  You can try using a wired ethernet cable or moving the computer around to experiment.

You might also just have a bad piece of hardware or driver, or you're running something on that computer that leaks memory such that Flash is crashing because it can't allocate memory.  What happens when you reboot the computer?  Does the crashing persist, or is it good for a number of hours after?

Since it's actually crashing, a crash dump would give us some super useful information.

https://helpx.adobe.com/flash-player/kb/report-flash-player-crash.html

My guess is that external network pressure (congestion/interference) precipitates a sub-optimal network condition (high latency, high packet loss), which probably tickles some kind of edge-case in the video code (e.g. error recovery code) that leads to a crash.  That code isn't hit under normal network conditions, but you're seeing it consistently when network conditions degrade during peak viewing times.   A crash dump would give us a definitive answer.

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