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Gathering a backup set to play flash games in the future.

New Here ,
Nov 07, 2020 Nov 07, 2020

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I have some flash games that I downloaded and enjoy playing from time to time. I want to gather the latest version of everything so I can maintain my ability to play these games in the future. I noticed a mention of a stand alone flash player which would be perfect for this purpose.

 

So, is the flash player projector the stand alone version?

 

Also, anything else that might be suggested for me to download and add to my backup to maintain the ability to play these legacy games? (I know there is no recomendation for playing stuff off the internet due to security, but I'm playing downloaded local files, something that was strangely inhibited)

 

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correct answers 1 Correct Answer

Adobe Employee , Nov 16, 2020 Nov 16, 2020
> I know there is no recomendation for playing stuff off the internet due to security, but I'm playing downloaded local files, something that was strangely inhibited. The problem there is that you're loading content on your local machine, but that content can send requests to the Internet.  There's actually a whole bunch of extra security considerations in play when you're running locally. The right way to do this is to build a virtual machine using VirtualBox or VMWare or something, populat...

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Most Valuable Participant ,
Nov 07, 2020 Nov 07, 2020

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To late. All the available versions have a time bomb, to stop specifically this for people who don't understand the huge risks of trying to keep this old tech running. For everyone who understand the risks there are ten who will download any old untrusted stuff, and it is to protect from this that the closedown is happening!

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New Here ,
Nov 09, 2020 Nov 09, 2020

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Hmm, what about the internet archive, what is the mosr recent version without the timebomb?

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Adobe Employee ,
Nov 07, 2020 Nov 07, 2020

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Microsoft recently released an Update on Adobe Flash Player End of Support which includes information on when they will be removing the embedded Flash Player in IE/Edge on Windows 8.x and above.

 

They've also released the currently optional update KB4577586 which removes the embedded Flash Player.  Note that this is destructive and the only way to get Flash Player for IE/Edge after applying this update is reset the device to an earlier restore point, or reinstall Windows OS and do not apply this update, as indicated in KB4577586.

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Adobe Employee ,
Nov 16, 2020 Nov 16, 2020

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> I know there is no recomendation for playing stuff off the internet due to security, but I'm playing downloaded local files, something that was strangely inhibited.

 

The problem there is that you're loading content on your local machine, but that content can send requests to the Internet.  There's actually a whole bunch of extra security considerations in play when you're running locally.

 

The right way to do this is to build a virtual machine using VirtualBox or VMWare or something, populate it with all of the software that you want to use, get it working, set the date and time way back, disconnect it from the Internet, make a snapshot, and then save and use that virtual machine for archival purposes.

 

The details on how to do that are way beyond the scope of what I'm prepared to support through this venue, but that's the general shape of it.  Some youtube and google searches should get you on the right path.

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New Here ,
Nov 21, 2020 Nov 21, 2020

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Yes, I understand that, though my laptop is generally not connected to begin with due to lacking home internet. Further, several of these are well known to me and blah, blah, blah. My point is that I am aware of the risks and how to mitigate them and do not need a nanny to treat me like an ignorant child, not so much your response, but rather the timebomb in the software to "protect me from myself." I hate that kind of stuff. Sometimes I fear that twenty years from now amatuers won't be allowed to learn programming or more likely OSs won't allow amatuer written code to run or something like that with only executables written by other companies and paid to the OS owning company to be put on a whitelist and all other code will be denied, and the idea both disgusts me and terrifies me. If I am allowed to skydive at the risk of death, then I should be allowed to use an outdated and unsupported piece of software. Just saying.

 

In any case, I still would like to know the most recent version that does not have the time bomb.

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Most Valuable Participant ,
Nov 21, 2020 Nov 21, 2020

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"Sometimes I fear that twenty years from now amatuers won't be allowed to learn programming or more likely OSs won't allow amatuer written code to run or something like that with only executables written by other companies and paid to the OS owning company to be put on a whitelist " The future is here. This is exactly the situation in Mac OS since a year ago. I doubt Microsoft will be far behind.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 21, 2020 Nov 21, 2020

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Best advice, find other interests that don't rely on Flash Player.  Most games and apps have already switched to non-flash based technologies.  If yours haven't switched by now, it's unlikely they ever will and their obsolescence is just around the corner.

 

Nancy O'Shea, Adobe Product User & Community Professional
Alt-Web Design & Publishing ~ Web : Print : Graphics : Media

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New Here ,
Nov 21, 2020 Nov 21, 2020

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First, old stuff can still be worth being kept around, especially art and games. I'm never going to say that a game should be thrown away just because it is old.

 

Second, not everyone can afford to keep up with the latest and greatest. My laptop was a bottom of the barrel model a decade ago, it has no hope of running modern software.

 

I can understand a company focusing on the lwading edge, that makes sense and can't be faulted. But there is a whole spectrum of people and products that trail behind that edge. Not all those products are worthless. Heck, I still enjoy playing Independence War, a game for windows 95. And your suggestion equivalently says to stop playing that fun game because it's old and hasn't been remastered, and that's not right. I play several flash games, such as thing-thing, which were made by amatuers and have no chance of being remade (to say nothing of remakes worse than the original), and you suggest I just toss them away?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 21, 2020 Nov 21, 2020

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Before CDs and DVDs, we had Sony Betamax, 8-track, cassettes and VHS tapes. But without a suitable player, those media formats are obsolete now.  After Dec 31st, the same will be true for Flash.  Here today, gone tomorrow.

 

Nancy O'Shea, Adobe Product User & Community Professional
Alt-Web Design & Publishing ~ Web : Print : Graphics : Media

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New Here ,
Dec 22, 2020 Dec 22, 2020

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Telling people that something being obsolete means they should just forget about it and stop using it is just terrible of you. Lots of people around the world keep up old obsolete stuff because they enjoy them and for newer generations to have a glimpse of the past and to preserve past works. Nothing stupid about it, so please stop telling me to "get over it" in sweet words. Polite wording doesn't make it right.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 23, 2020 Dec 23, 2020

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Unfortunately, delusional thoughts & lies don't make fact out of fiction. If we told you a lie and said "Flash will last forever" when it's not, that wouldn't be right would it?  I'm very sorry you don't like the message.  But that's no reason to shoot the messenger.  Just sayin'...

❄   ☃   ❄

Happy Holidays!

 

Nancy O'Shea, Adobe Product User & Community Professional
Alt-Web Design & Publishing ~ Web : Print : Graphics : Media

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New Here ,
Dec 24, 2020 Dec 24, 2020

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This isn't about whether it becomes obsolete, no one questions that it is
obsolete, but guess what, in cars there are still Ford model Ts running,
the original mass produced car. I know cause I drove one. Those are very
obsolete, but not only are there people out there maintaining them, you'll
also notice a lack of Ford employees running around destroying them and
telling their owners to get over the fact that the T is obsolete and how
they just need to suck it up and get on with their lives.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 25, 2020 Dec 25, 2020

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"...you'll also notice a lack of Ford employees running around destroying them"

 

It makes me chuckle when people try to make their point with irrational comparisons. Intellectual property (software) is not comparable with tangible items (antiques) because entirely different rules apply.  And for anyone to imply that Adobe has committed some form of mischief or mayhem is grossly unfair and misguided.  Adobe has done nothing wrong. 

 

Using your Model T analogy, Ford owns the patents but they don't own the remaining cars on the road.  When your Model T breaks down, Ford doesn't fix it for you.  It's your problem, not theirs.  Assuming you can still find parts and fuel, theoretically your Model T could keep running well into the 2100's because the engineering technology still works on its own terms. 

 

Unlike Ford, Adobe retains ownership of the intellectual property they create. When Adobe software breaks down, they must fix it.  And they must keep fixing it for the life of the product. As software users, we don't own anything.  Flash Player is free. We merely use the technology at Adobe's discretion.  Eventually, permission to use the software ends when Adobe says it ends because they own it!

 

After 3 years advanced notice, Flash Player will reach end of life soon and with it the end of an era.  A little sad perhaps but certainly not a tragedy because we have all had plenty of time to prepare.  When the dust finally settles, most people will never miss Flash Player.

 

There's not much more to say on this except goodbye & good luck to you in 2021!  I wish you all the best.

 

Nancy O'Shea, Adobe Product User & Community Professional
Alt-Web Design & Publishing ~ Web : Print : Graphics : Media

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