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Keep getting messages that I Flash Player is out of date...

New Here ,
Jan 25, 2017 Jan 25, 2017

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I have Microsoft Edge, Window 10 and keep getting messages about updating Adobe flash but it is not from adobe--how can I stop this from happening?

Warning! That link is dangerous and has been deleted. It downloads a bogus Flash Player not from Adobe.

The website itself redirects to other suspicious sites. -- Moderator

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 25, 2017 Jan 25, 2017

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don't go to that site

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New Here ,
Jan 25, 2017 Jan 25, 2017

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I KNOW NOT to go to the site and install anything but these just keep popping up and I want them to stop!  Why is someone else trying to install Adobe software?

This did not answer my question of how do I get these to stop popping up?

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Adobe Employee ,
Jan 26, 2017 Jan 26, 2017

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"Why is someone else trying to install Adobe software?"  The holy grail question.  Why do people intentionally distribute viruses and malware, etc?  Because they're not very nice and they want to exploit your system, and you.

Most likely your system is infected with some malware/adware/etc. Run a complete system scan.  If it finds nothing (and it may very well will) contact a local trusted IT person, or one of a myriad of legitimate support sites on the internet to assist you in cleaning up your system.  Aside from forwarding the screenshots to our fraud department (which you can also do by emailing phishing@adobe.com) there's not much we can do as this isn't coming from Adobe, but something malicious on your system, local network, or websites you're visiting.

--

Maria

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Adobe Employee ,
Jan 26, 2017 Jan 26, 2017

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Hi Sharon6886

Would it be possible for you to provide the entire URL?  I forwarded the screenshots to our fraud department and they are asking for this information. Please don't post the URL here in the forums, instead private message it to me.  To send a private message, click on my user name link and then on the 'Message' button link.  For reference, also include a link to this discussion topic.


Thank you.

--

Maria

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New Here ,
Apr 04, 2018 Apr 04, 2018

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I keep getting this type of message as well. The full address is:

          https://no4sheveryclick.org/93115268244012/bd1a08498efde22c2279f63f9eea9ba7/3ee42699550414b3ed205224...

I realized it had to be bogus, but it is VERY, VERY LEGITIMATE LOOKING, I will say that. I have done several scans and come up with nothing. If I do I will post it again here. Good luck to all. Pen and paper is looking really good just as it did when I was a kid in the '70's. these computers never did quite make life as promised and actually have ruined a lot of lives in the balance. Sorry, just had to get on the soap box for a moment.

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Adobe Employee ,
Apr 06, 2018 Apr 06, 2018

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LATEST

About a year ago, there was a widespread (and widely publicized) vulnerability in commodity wifi routers that allowed attackers to inject malicious code into the device's memory.  Since Flash Player is ubiquitous, it's the go-to product to impersonate if you're trying to get someone to install your malware.

If this is popping up all over the place (i.e. on legitimate sites) and you haven't update the firmware on your wifi router lately (or like most normal people, ever), there's a decent chance that it's infected.  The good news is that the infection is typically only resident in volatile memory.  Simply powering the router off and back on will resolve it (at least until something on the Internet re-infects it).

Once you've power-cycled your router, log in to it and install the latest available firmware.  That should prevent the problem from coming back.

If your router offers an auto-update option, definitely enable that (most older ones don't).  If not, it would be wise to set a calendar reminder for yourself to just check to make sure you're running the latest firmware every couple months.  If that sounds like a hassle, you might consider upgrading to one of the modern routers that *does* have automatic updates.

If the problem persists, you might consider whether the sites you're visiting truly are reputable, and/or running a scan from a reputable antivirus/antimalware vendor.

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