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Windows 10 Version 1809 will not "Always Allow" Flash Player.

New Here ,
Feb 03, 2019 Feb 03, 2019

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Adobe Flash Player in Windows 10 Version 1809 does not “always allow Flash Player”. The help site says click on the "Always Allow" button but "allow once” is all that appears. The Alternative where you click on the “lock or !” does not mention Adobe Flash, only media and as a result it does not "always allow Adobe Flash Player" either. There is a major bug in the Windows 10 Version 1809 program. Does anyone have a work around for this issue?

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Adobe Employee , Feb 05, 2019 Feb 05, 2019
It's not a bug - it's by design - see https://blogs.windows.com/msedgedev/2017/07/25/flash-on-windows-timeline/ All major browser vendors are moving in the same direction as far as blocking/disabling Flash in the browser and making the user experience more unpleasant.  For example, as of Chrome 69, when a user exits out of Chrome, Chrome deletes the user's white-list of sites to allow Flash on.  The following may be of assistance:Flash & The Future of Interactive Content | Adobe Blog Flash Roadmap - The Chromium Projects...

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Adobe Employee ,
Feb 04, 2019 Feb 04, 2019

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The browser 'allow' settings are determined by the browser vendor not Adobe.  In this case, it sounds like Microsoft made a change in Edge with the release of Windows 10 version 1809 to remove the 'always allow' option.

The instructions we have on the Adobe Flash Player issues with Windows 10 (Microsoft Edge) help page came directly from Microsoft.  I'll follow-up internally and update the page if necessary.

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New Here ,
Feb 05, 2019 Feb 05, 2019

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I'm sorry.  I thought it was clear that the "bug" was in the Windows "Edge" browser.  Have you ever tried to tell Microsoft they made a mistake or even tried to just talk to them?  Good luck with that.  I thought there might be a smart person out there who has figured out how to work around the Microsoft Edge bug, or at the very least, get Microsoft's attention and let them know they have an issue in their Edge browser that needs to be addressed.

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Adobe Employee ,
Feb 05, 2019 Feb 05, 2019

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It's not a bug - it's by design - see https://blogs.windows.com/msedgedev/2017/07/25/flash-on-windows-timeline/

All major browser vendors are moving in the same direction as far as blocking/disabling Flash in the browser and making the user experience more unpleasant.  For example, as of Chrome 69, when a user exits out of Chrome, Chrome deletes the user's white-list of sites to allow Flash on.  The following may be of assistance:

Flash & The Future of Interactive Content | Adobe Blog

Flash Roadmap - The Chromium Projects

Plugin Roadmap for Firefox - Plugins | MDN

Next Steps for Legacy Plug-ins | WebKit

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New Here ,
Feb 05, 2019 Feb 05, 2019

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Thank you for that unpublicized fact.

So what will “all the major browser vendors” be using instead?

Are “all the major browser vendors” using the same replacement program or will it be come this is an Edge site, this is a Safari site, this is a Firefox site?

Has this information be conveyed to all the web sites that up till now have relied upon Flash Player?

How do I know that my current version of Edge has this new program?

Should I communicate my issues to all the web sites that are not Flash Player demise compliant?

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Adobe Employee ,
Feb 05, 2019 Feb 05, 2019

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Has this information be conveyed to all the web sites that up till now have relied upon Flash Player?

I'm not sure how this is possible, considering the number of web-sites in existence that may use Flash content.  When Adobe published the announcement (18 months ago), in concert with the browser vendors, many major (and not-so-major) industry publications had a post on the announcement.

Are “all the major browser vendors” using the same replacement program or will it be come this is an Edge site, this is a Safari site, this is a Firefox site?

How do I know that my current version of Edge has this new program?

Newer technologies will replace what Flash does.  For example, HTML5 video has been the default video format on YouTube (and other video sites) for many years.  HTML5 is a web standard supported by the various browser vendors.

There really isn't any one single replacement program.  Technology is constantly evolving and has been around video and other features Flash supports.  HTML5, Javascript, CSS, WebAssembly are a few of these.

Should I communicate my issues to all the web sites that are not Flash Player demise compliant?

You're free to do what as you wish.  Many corporations (small and large) are already aware of this, and some no longer use Flash video.  Others will migrate to different technologies they deem satisfies their business needs.  Websites being actively maintained will adapt.  Websites no longer being actively maintained will most likely fall by the wayside and most likely will not function post-2020, when browses completely block Flash.

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Most Valuable Participant ,
Feb 05, 2019 Feb 05, 2019

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One more take on "Has this information be conveyed to all the web sites that up till now have relied upon Flash Player?​"


These changes are designed to annoy YOU so that YOU convey this information to each web site that is important to YOU. Thus, you tell the web site designers who have taken their eye off the ball, which if they are still using Flash they probably have.

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New Here ,
Feb 08, 2019 Feb 08, 2019

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I tried HTML5 in a game that was requiring me to authorize Flash Player each time.  HTML5 is buggy, glitchy, and incredibly SLOW!  This is one of the worst product roll outs ever.  This John Haze, who is the "Principal Program Manager" must be related to Gates or his wife because in any other industry a roll out like this would cost people their jobs.

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