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change fonts in a variable

Community Beginner ,
Mar 23, 2017

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Hello,

I'd like to use two different fonts in a variable (webdings and Kodzuka Gothic, if that makes a difference). I can't figure out how to make both fonts appear at the same time. I'm using FrameMaker

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change fonts in a variable

Community Beginner ,
Mar 23, 2017

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Hello,

I'd like to use two different fonts in a variable (webdings and Kodzuka Gothic, if that makes a difference). I can't figure out how to make both fonts appear at the same time. I'm using FrameMaker

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120

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Mar 23, 2017 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 23, 2017

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Create two Character Formats, defined all As-Is or blank except for Font Family, for example:
Tagname: Webdings, Family: Webdings
Tagname: Kodzuka Gothic, Family: Kodzuka Gothic

Suppose the variable desired is the prohibited circle icon with a non-breaking space and text "STOP!"

Define your variable, named, say "Stop here"
Definition: <Webdings>x<Kodzuka Gothic>\ STOP!

There is no need to include <Default ¶ Font> at any point, because the <KG> tag completely replaces the action of the <Wd> tag and the end-of-variable turns off all Character Formats applied inside the var.

In the Unicode age, using Webdings (and codepage/overlay fonts generally) is discouraged if you have a font that populates the glyph you need. For this example, that would be
'PROHIBITED SIGN' (U+1F6C7).

If you are doing a workflow that for any reason fails to embed the Webdings font, such as to HTML, the glyph invoked may well show up as some nearly random Roman character ("x" in the case of the prohibit glyph).

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Mar 23, 2017 3
Adobe Employee ,
Mar 23, 2017

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Yes, I would like to second that using a unicode glyph – if available in the font and if the look and feel of it fits the needs – is "smarter". Otherwise using two character styles (or just one for the "icon"if the paragraph's font is already Kodzuka Gothic) is the way to go.

In case Kodzuka Gothic is the paragraph font it would look like this:

<Webdings>x<Default Font>\ Stop!

Or just

<Webdings>x</>\ Stop!

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Mar 23, 2017 1
Community Beginner ,
Mar 23, 2017

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Very helpful, thank you!

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Mar 23, 2017 0