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Define variable as caution icon

New Here ,
Jul 07, 2015

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hello,
i have defined a variable as caution icon. <FontAwsomeBigRed>\t<Bold>CAUTION\t

It would be great if i could apply it automatically to the caution paragraph like the numbering.

Is it possible to define a own building block?

I couldn't find a solution. If there is any - please tell me.

Thanks!

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Define variable as caution icon

New Here ,
Jul 07, 2015

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hello,
i have defined a variable as caution icon. <FontAwsomeBigRed>\t<Bold>CAUTION\t

It would be great if i could apply it automatically to the caution paragraph like the numbering.

Is it possible to define a own building block?

I couldn't find a solution. If there is any - please tell me.

Thanks!

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Jul 07, 2015 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 07, 2015

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re: ... apply it automatically to the caution paragraph ...

A customary way to do this is to define named paragraph formats such as Caution, Warning, Danger, that use the FrameAbove feature (Advanced tab) to pull in an ANSI graphic and text from a Reference Page.

The art resides in separate named frames on the RP. Normally, you can't name graphic frames, but you can (and must for this use) do so on an RP.

For extra credit, make sure the graphic is in vector form (EPS, PDF, possibly SVG) so that it scales cleanly. Use actual text or outlines for the terms. See also: ANSI Z535.1 Safety Colors in Frame

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Jul 07, 2015 0
New Here ,
Jul 08, 2015

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yes, but I need the icon on the left and not on top.
I solved it by by combining font-awsome with another free font.

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Jul 08, 2015 0
Most Valuable Participant ,
Jul 08, 2015

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To get the icon on the left, you need to use two paratags together. There are two methods:

1. If the symbol is in a font and you also need text, as in your example, then set the first paratag to use the symbol font in the autonumber and have this set to run-in to the next paratag that uses the (caution) text in the autonumber.

2. If the symbol is a gaphic, then set the first paratag to use a reference frame below. Set the Space Below for this to be a negative value equal to the distance of where the next paratag would fall plus the Line Spacing. Then set the next paratag to have this same negative value in the Space Above. This will force FM to pull the following paragraph back up over top of the reference frame paragraph, effectively making it look like the symbol was set to the left. You may have to play the spacing value to get the correct visual alignment depending upon how the graphic is palced in the reference frame.

Note: use the Next Paragraph Tag setting in the first paratag to automatically call the next one and all you need to do is apply the tag, hit Enter and type the content required for caution/warning text.

Other methods to get the symbol on the left involve using a two-cell table with icon inserted using the referene frame method in the first cell and the caution text in the adjacent cell.

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Jul 08, 2015 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 08, 2015

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re: <FontAwsomeBigRed>\t<Bold>CAUTION\t

You may need to do some more homework on this. These sorts of safety admonishments are covered by formal standards (ANSI Z535.6 and the not necessarily harmonious ISO 3864-2), which themselves rely on safety colors elsewhere in those standards families. These standards typically are not found for free on line.

I don't know if you'll be able to fake the needed background color using that feature available in recent FMs for that, but it's worth a try.

You don't want to have corporate counsel or the liability carrier show up at some future point asking you to regenerate all the documents to comply with standards. You really don't want to learn it from opposing counsel while explaining what you did, during a deposition.

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