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How to get proper runaround/spacing for inline graphics

Mentor ,
Jan 08, 2016

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Hi,

(FM2015, Windows 7, structured documents)

I have yet to figure out how to get automatic runaround (or better yet, automatically-adjusted line spacing) for an "At Insertion Point" anchored frame. Is this possible? See the sample pic... the anchored frames always overlay any surrounding content. Can this be fixed? The runaround properties of the graphic inside don't seem to change anything.

fm_graphics.png

Thanks,

Russ

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by Bob_Niland | Adobe Community Professional

That overlap is probably due to Paragraph Format > Basic

Line Spacing:

  • Fixed
    being selected. Unselect it and see what happens.
  • You might also consider, for those little Anchored Frames:
    * tighten up the cropping

    * set Distance Above Baseline to zero or even slightly negative

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    How to get proper runaround/spacing for inline graphics

    Mentor ,
    Jan 08, 2016

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    Hi,

    (FM2015, Windows 7, structured documents)

    I have yet to figure out how to get automatic runaround (or better yet, automatically-adjusted line spacing) for an "At Insertion Point" anchored frame. Is this possible? See the sample pic... the anchored frames always overlay any surrounding content. Can this be fixed? The runaround properties of the graphic inside don't seem to change anything.

    fm_graphics.png

    Thanks,

    Russ

    Adobe Community Professional
    Correct answer by Bob_Niland | Adobe Community Professional

    That overlap is probably due to Paragraph Format > Basic

    Line Spacing:

  • Fixed
    being selected. Unselect it and see what happens.
  • You might also consider, for those little Anchored Frames:
    * tighten up the cropping

    * set Distance Above Baseline to zero or even slightly negative

    Views

    727

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    Jan 08, 2016 0
    Adobe Community Professional ,
    Jan 08, 2016

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    That overlap is probably due to Paragraph Format > Basic

    Line Spacing:

  • Fixed
    being selected. Unselect it and see what happens.
  • You might also consider, for those little Anchored Frames:
    * tighten up the cropping

    * set Distance Above Baseline to zero or even slightly negative

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    Jan 08, 2016 0
    Mentor ,
    Jan 08, 2016

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    Bob, that did the trick, thanks. I guess I don't really know what "Fixed" setting really means. Maybe just that if you uncheck it, the specified line spacing is a minimum only?

    Russ

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    Jan 08, 2016 0
    Adobe Community Professional ,
    Jan 08, 2016

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    re: I guess I don't really know what "Fixed" setting really means.

    It means use the Line Spacing as specified, period, and do not adjust for anchored frames, oversize text in the line, content from adjoining lines, and probably other intruders.

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    Jan 08, 2016 0
    Adobe Employee ,
    Jan 09, 2016

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    It's not easy to understand even for typo specialists 😉
    What is called “Line Spacing” in FrameMaker is called “Leading‌” in classic typesetting (in InDesign it's actually called "Leading"). The corresponding CSS property is line-height. It specifies the vertical distance between the baselines of successive lines of type.

    FrameMaker allows to specify this leading (distance between baselines) and automatically change this for a single line (to avoid lines colliding) where necessary. Or you can set Line Spacing to "Fixed". Personally I prefer the fixed setting. FrameMaker offers self-calculated "Single", "1.5" and "Double" line spacings, but you can enter any value of your choice.

    When setting line spacing to "Fixed", it's important to calculate the value carefully and balance between visual appearance of the text (readability) and typographic needs. The minimum should be the size of the distance between ascender height and descender height, if you want to be sure that that a descender in one line never overlaps with a ascender of a succeeding line. But that's not enough:

    • Some ascenders (like the "h" in the example), can exceed the cap height (ascender height).
    • In some languages text will have additional diacritics on top of that (like ĥ (latin small letter h with circumflex (U0125)). Consider this especially, when you plan to get your manuals translated into one of these languages to avoid additional post-translation design changes.
    • Some languages like Vietnamese like to stack multiple diacritics on top of each other (like "ế" (latin small character e with circumflex and acute accent above) which can exceed ascender height dramatically.
    • Also make sure that if you have superscript and subscript formatting or footnotes in the text, that it does not clash with descenders and ascenders (or stacks of diacritics) of preceding and succeeding lines. Note, that sup and subscript formatting can exceed the ascender heights as well. (Note: you can specify the way how superscript and subscript are formatted in a document via > Format > Document > Text Options …).

    A "rule of thumb" is to calculate with 120% of font size (which is actually what InDesign does). For a 12 Point Times New Roman, this will result in 14.4 Line Spacing. FrameMaker calculates this differently and goes for only 14.0 Points. However, it always depends on the font anyway. While 120% is fine for many fonts (like Times New Roman, Arial etc.), it's not enough for e.g. "Big Caslon" (descender of Line1 and ascender with diacritics will nearly glue) and in Futura, they will already overlap. So, you will always have to test it.


    Cheers,

    *Stefan.

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    Jan 09, 2016 0
    Mentor ,
    Jan 11, 2016

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    Stefan, that was way beyond the call of duty. Thank you for all that.

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    Jan 11, 2016 1