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Placing graphics on a page

Explorer ,
Oct 25, 2015

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When you place a graphic on a page, are there advantages or disadvantages to putting it inside or outside a text frame?

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Correct answer by Bob_Niland | Adobe Community Professional

There are four, maybe more, ways to put a graphic on a page:

  1. Anchored frame in text flow, including various nestings, such as in a table cell in a table anchored to the flow. This graphic stays with that text when/if the text is re-flowed to a different page, and is the recommended way to do it unless stays-with-re-flow is not desired, or you can't get the placement desired relative to the text frame.
  2. On Master Page - causes it to appear on every page that invokes that MP. Does not reflow with text. Sometimes suitable for title page or chapter first pages.
  3. On Reference Page, invoked by a Paragraph Format using Frame Above or Frame Below. Reflows when that para reflows. Recommended when a commonly used para tag (such as safety admonishments) always need that graphic.
  4. On Body Page - stays on that page number regardless of what the text later does. Can become difficult to select (or make other page elements difficult to select. Stays on that page even if the page has no other content (making it difficult to delete that as an empty page) - therefore not recommended.

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Placing graphics on a page

Explorer ,
Oct 25, 2015

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When you place a graphic on a page, are there advantages or disadvantages to putting it inside or outside a text frame?

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by Bob_Niland | Adobe Community Professional

There are four, maybe more, ways to put a graphic on a page:

  1. Anchored frame in text flow, including various nestings, such as in a table cell in a table anchored to the flow. This graphic stays with that text when/if the text is re-flowed to a different page, and is the recommended way to do it unless stays-with-re-flow is not desired, or you can't get the placement desired relative to the text frame.
  2. On Master Page - causes it to appear on every page that invokes that MP. Does not reflow with text. Sometimes suitable for title page or chapter first pages.
  3. On Reference Page, invoked by a Paragraph Format using Frame Above or Frame Below. Reflows when that para reflows. Recommended when a commonly used para tag (such as safety admonishments) always need that graphic.
  4. On Body Page - stays on that page number regardless of what the text later does. Can become difficult to select (or make other page elements difficult to select. Stays on that page even if the page has no other content (making it difficult to delete that as an empty page) - therefore not recommended.

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Oct 25, 2015 0
Most Valuable Participant ,
Oct 25, 2015

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If you place a graphic on a page [outside of an anchored frame], then it doesn't matter if you place it inside or outsie the text frame. It will always remain on that page and depending upon your runaound settings will "repel" text found in the text frame.

If you want the graphic to remain at the text location regardless of content changes later, then you need to insert it into an anchored frame in the text flow of the text frame.

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Oct 25, 2015 0
Explorer ,
Oct 25, 2015

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Hi Arnis,

Thank you for your feedback. Now I have a better idea how I can create the cover page of the manual.

Regards,

Carel from Holland.

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Oct 25, 2015 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 25, 2015

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There are four, maybe more, ways to put a graphic on a page:

  1. Anchored frame in text flow, including various nestings, such as in a table cell in a table anchored to the flow. This graphic stays with that text when/if the text is re-flowed to a different page, and is the recommended way to do it unless stays-with-re-flow is not desired, or you can't get the placement desired relative to the text frame.
  2. On Master Page - causes it to appear on every page that invokes that MP. Does not reflow with text. Sometimes suitable for title page or chapter first pages.
  3. On Reference Page, invoked by a Paragraph Format using Frame Above or Frame Below. Reflows when that para reflows. Recommended when a commonly used para tag (such as safety admonishments) always need that graphic.
  4. On Body Page - stays on that page number regardless of what the text later does. Can become difficult to select (or make other page elements difficult to select. Stays on that page even if the page has no other content (making it difficult to delete that as an empty page) - therefore not recommended.

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Oct 25, 2015 0
Explorer ,
Oct 25, 2015

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Hello Bob,

Thanks for your elaborate answer.

Regards,

Carel.

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Oct 25, 2015 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 26, 2015

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Also, if you ever want to produce Published help from your content, you’ll need to have them in anchored frames.

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Oct 26, 2015 0
Explorer ,
Oct 26, 2015

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Hi Jeff,

Thanks for the heads up.

I'll keep it in mind.

Regards,

Carel.

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Oct 26, 2015 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 26, 2015

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re: Also, if you ever want to produce Published help from your content, you’ll need to have them in anchored frames.

Does FrameAbove/Below survive that path?
This thread suggests that they do.

Also, there's yet another way to incorporate simple graphics:

5. As text, where the graphic is in outline form, or can be converted to it.

You'd use a font authoring tool, converting the outlines to glyphs, assigned to Unicode code points in Private Use space.

Probably not a great idea for workflows other than PDF or print.

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Oct 26, 2015 0