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Replicating callouts from MS Word

New Here ,
Jul 22, 2020

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I'm returning to Frame after 15 years, and while I'm managing to figure quite a few things out via help and google, I'm interested in improving my efficiency.

 

I've searched and found a few articles about replicating callouts from MS Word, so in general I have the impression that I need to use text frames to create them. I spent some time fiddling with settings, because I want the background colour to be grey. I got that, but it's very tight to the text, which I don't like. I want a surrounding area of grey. I found that I can add this by putting the text frame into an anchored frame, and literally using the anchored frame like a picture frame to give me more surrounding grey. I've attached a picure that shows the boundary of the text frame within the anchored frame. Hopefully this clarifies what I'm explaning.

 

Question 1: Am I missing a setting on the text frame that let's me create a larger area around the text that will also get the background colour?

 

Next, I've got a picture in the center of the page, and I'm putting 4 of these callouts (ie. anchored frames) down each side of the picture. I'm finding that lining up the anchored frames is painful - yes I can turn on the rulers and the grid, but there doesn't appear to be any snap-to feature, or any control over the spacing of the grid lines. I found the align control, but it doesn't seem to work with anchored frames (or I'm just doing something wrong, since the help doesn't really tell me how to select the objects I'm trying to align).

 

Question 2: Am I missing something obvious here? Or is it really just an "eyeball it" scenario?

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Formatting and numbering, Getting started

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Replicating callouts from MS Word

New Here ,
Jul 22, 2020

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I'm returning to Frame after 15 years, and while I'm managing to figure quite a few things out via help and google, I'm interested in improving my efficiency.

 

I've searched and found a few articles about replicating callouts from MS Word, so in general I have the impression that I need to use text frames to create them. I spent some time fiddling with settings, because I want the background colour to be grey. I got that, but it's very tight to the text, which I don't like. I want a surrounding area of grey. I found that I can add this by putting the text frame into an anchored frame, and literally using the anchored frame like a picture frame to give me more surrounding grey. I've attached a picure that shows the boundary of the text frame within the anchored frame. Hopefully this clarifies what I'm explaning.

 

Question 1: Am I missing a setting on the text frame that let's me create a larger area around the text that will also get the background colour?

 

Next, I've got a picture in the center of the page, and I'm putting 4 of these callouts (ie. anchored frames) down each side of the picture. I'm finding that lining up the anchored frames is painful - yes I can turn on the rulers and the grid, but there doesn't appear to be any snap-to feature, or any control over the spacing of the grid lines. I found the align control, but it doesn't seem to work with anchored frames (or I'm just doing something wrong, since the help doesn't really tell me how to select the objects I'm trying to align).

 

Question 2: Am I missing something obvious here? Or is it really just an "eyeball it" scenario?

TOPICS
Formatting and numbering, Getting started

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Jul 22, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 22, 2020

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I would avoid the extra frame. Just use the text frame with left and right indents on the callout paragraph. To get the top and bottom offsets, use small Frame Above Pgf and Frame Below Pgf spacers that you create on a reference page. Make sure these frames are transparent so that the gray background that you apply to the text frame shows through. Multiple text frames can be selected and aligned (unlike unanchored frames).

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Jul 22, 2020 0
New Here ,
Jul 22, 2020

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Perfect.

If I'm honest, I'd forgotten all about the reference pages. It turns out the default table footnote works alright for this.

I appreciate the response. Thanks!

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Jul 22, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 22, 2020

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I wish the FrameMaker team would add all of the text frame goodies that InDesign has:

  • Separate inset values for all four sides.
  • Autoresizing based on content for height or width or both.
  • Vertical alignment of the content within the text frame (similar to table cells in FrameMaker).
  • Separate fill and stroke colors.

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Jul 22, 2020 0
New Here ,
Jul 22, 2020

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Agreed. I'm honestly a little suprised that after 15 years away they still don't have a callout tool of some sort - even if it's just a text frame that allows you to turn on a line that's attached to it. I've seen many posts online about how to do this, so strikes me that there's a need. But I guess it hasn't rated high on their to-do list.

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Jul 22, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 22, 2020

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One suggestion, though. I would avoid using the existing table footnote frame unless you are sure you won't use it for table footnotes. Also it's best to name your reference frames according to their purpose; for example "callout-spacer-top" and "callout-spacer-bottom". That makes them self-documenting. I also like to have a separate one for the top and bottom offset in case my client wants spacing adjusted on one and not the other.

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Jul 22, 2020 0
New Here ,
Jul 22, 2020

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Fair point. I already know I won't be using the table footnote for anything else. But as a best practice, I agree with you. I was mostly just trying to get a quick success without having to remind myself how to make new reference objects. But yes, I'll create some purpose-built ones.

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Jul 22, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 22, 2020

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Now that FrameMaker 2020 can convert native FrameMaker graphics to SVG files, maybe they will add some new graphic tools and features. But as my dad used to say, "Don't hold your breath." 🙂

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Jul 22, 2020 0