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Exporting a file as a JPG while maintaining quality but not exceeding resolution limit

New Here ,
May 26, 2023 May 26, 2023

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I am trying to export an illustrator file as a JPG so I can transfer it onto a TV at my job while still maintaining the image quality. While I have gotten it to export as a JPG, it appears blurry on the TV. The original file I was editing was also a JPG, its dimensions were 3840 px x 2160 px, however the TV keeps telling me it does not support the resolution of this new file if I go past 960px. I was not sure if the size of the final exported file was equivalent to the resolution, and if I can change the resolution seperatly from the artboard size. I was wondering if there was a way I could export my file as a JPG while still maintinging quality and not going past the resolution limit of the tv? Thank you so much!

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How-to , Import and export

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New Here ,
May 26, 2023 May 26, 2023

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UPDATE: I was able to figure out how to change the resolution independent of the artboard size, but the TV is still saying that the resolution is not supported even though it is on 72 ppi

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Community Expert ,
May 26, 2023 May 26, 2023

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Marcus,

 

The following may sound unforgivably outdated and boring, sorry.


If you wish to have PNGs (PNG24 (also (little) known as PNG32, it holds 24 bit colour and 8 bit Alpha channel (transparency)), of course) look crisp and clean, at least when it is (also) to be used at moderate screen resolutions, it is important to have the images in the exact desired final pixel x pixel size, or at sizes that are powers of 2 times as large (2x, 4x, 8x, and so on, the larger values can improve the appearance on high resolution screens and still ensure best possible appearance at low resolution screens); forget about image resolution which may actually lead to wrong sizes and hence blurriness, or work at 72PPI or powers of 2 times as large (144PPI, 266PPI, 576PPI, and so on).


It is easiest and safest to work at the desired size when creating the artwork.


It is important to remember that a raster image represents the whole appearance, including strokes, so to make sure you get it right you can click Show Preview Bounds in the General Preferences (and untick it afterwards).


A very common unsuitable way is to Export to PNG (remember to use PNG24 and use Transparency for artwork to be in front of different backgrounds) with a medium or high resolution, such as 300PPI.


And a common misunderstanding: (almost) 11 out of 10 times, a statement like "I created the document at 300 PPI" means that the value is chosen in Effect>Document Raster Effects Settings; however that only means that the (current) resolution of any raster effects applied to the vector artwork, such as (any kind of) Blur, is set to that value (and only unless/until the value is changed to something else); when zooming in, this resolution can be seen in contrast to and on the background of the vector artwork. So this setting has nothing whatsoever to do with the actual resolution of a raster image created from the (vector) artwork (but it ought to (at least) match it).


For clean and crisp artwork avoid JPEG; to get the colours right, you may wish/need to finalize by opening the PNG in PS (Photoshop) and attach the (missing) colour profile (such as sRGB) there.


It is also important to have the artwork and also the Artboard(s) placed fully within integer/whole pixel X and Y values in the Workspace, which means that the X and Y values at the corners must be integer; this can be ensured by using one of the corner Reference Points in the Transform palette, and then checking that all the values X, Y, W, and H, are integer (the centre Reference Point can only be used if both W and H are even numbers).


If you have issues with the Artboard(s), make sure the rulers are Global Rulers (RightClick), if not change from Artboard to Global Rulers; and to align your artboards, click the Rearrange All Artboards button in the Artboards panel. First posted by Ton here,
https://community.adobe.com/t5/illustrator-discussions/why-is-illustrator-not-exporting-artboard-siz...


Otherwise the resulting image will become a bit wider/taller and the extension(s) will be empty and therefore be (partially) transparent/white.


Therefore, a safe way is to create the artwork at the final pixel x pixel size and use a corresponding Artboard, then use the Legacity Save for Web (where you can look in the Image Size window for size confirmation and possibly multiply by 2, 4, 8, whatever), or use Export at 72PPI (or 144/288/576/whatever PPI), or use Export for Screens (in either way). In either case, use the relevant optimization (available with both ways); it is also convenient to have 72PPI (or 144/288/576/whatever PPI) in the Effect>Document Raster Effect Settings.


If you have pure vector artwork, you can relax a bit and have the artwork/Artboard at any size (the Artboard must have the same proportions as the final image), then use the Legacity Save for Web and set either Width or Height in the Image Size and Apply (make sure the other value is also correct).


The Legacy Save for Web may be an old carthorse, but it knows its way home, even if the driver is drunk and sleeping it off in the hay in the back.

 

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Community Expert ,
May 26, 2023 May 26, 2023

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Is the graphics you're producing meant for over the air broadcast TV production? If so, then you need to create your graphics according to that standard. The 720p standard is 1280 X 720 pixels at 60 progressive frames per second. The 1080i standard is 1920 X 1080 at 60 interlaced frames per second (or 30 real frames). The 3840 X 2160 size is Ultra HD, aka "4K". While it's possible to stream certain TV shows in 2160p quality nearly all regular TV broadcasting is done in 720p or 1080i. In the US most ABC and FOX stations broadcast in 720p while CBS and NBC use 1080i.

 

The 72ppi thing shouldn't make a difference; the factor that really matters is the correct pixel dimensions of the artwork. I would consider using one of the "Film & Video" document presets, likely either the HDV 720 or HDV/HDTV 1080 (or working with the same document settings).

 

Jacob is right about using PNG instead of JPEG. The JPEG format uses data lossy compression. JPEG images saved at compression levels under "high" or "maximum" settings can show visible compression artifacts. Macro-blocking and mosquito noise can show up in broad flat fields of color or around the edges of lettering. PNG in normal settings uses a type of lossless compression. PNG is far more friendly to graphical looking imagery, plus you can get alpha channel support for transparency effects.

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