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Corel vs. Illustrator

New Here ,
Jul 07, 2018

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Hello I am in no way an expert but I have some background in fashion which at that time I would mostly use Corel to do flat lay's and color charts which Corel is very good for. I have since moved into the cosmetic sector which has different needs for coloring and laying out images. I have been told that the Illustrator is overall a more loaded version of Corel. The company I am currently working with is REMOVED

For example most of the pics on that site are actual images of people wearing the products so photoshop has been very effective for touching up the images.

Can anybody recommend any better graphic software for both making technical renders and being able to do touch ups in one solution?

Thanks in advance


Shawn

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 08, 2018

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Corel is a company, as is Adobe. Which Corel product or products do you use? Examples include:

  • Corel WordPerfect
  • Corel Painter
  • CorelDRAW
  • Corel Paintshop Pro

Adobe Illustrator is for vector drawing, similar to CorelDRAW. You can download a free 7-day trial to test it. You might also watch some videos at www.lynda.com. You can also get a free trial there, assuming you haven't done so before.

Illustrator is the industry standard for vector drawing these days.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 08, 2018

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Hi Shawn,

You may well be hard pressed to find an application in which you can create technical vectors and retouch in one.

The best combination in my opinion would be Illustrator to create the render and Photoshop for the touch ups.

I hope this helps.

Sim 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 08, 2018

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Having taught at the Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising for many years, the standard in both fashion and beauty was to use both Illustrator for the technical flats and then Photoshop for any imagery work, compositing, etc. The workflow between the programs becomes very intuitive after awhile and it is really best to take advantage of each program's strengths as you get a more professional result. While you could try to use the vector aspects of Photoshop, working with both programs will actually be easier in the long run.

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Most Valuable Participant ,
Jul 08, 2018

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If you want the leading edge, don’t look for one app to rule them all

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 08, 2018

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Illustrator and Coral are both very good programs, but the fact is Illustrator is the industry standard. Most companies

are moving to Illustrator because of its flexibility. It works well with other industry standard programs.

But Test Screen Name is right. To keep up and be competitive. You should have an understanding of all creative software.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 03, 2020

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"flexibility"

I mean, it's great that CorelDRAW has a flood fill, but whenyou dothe very same with Live Paint in Illustrator, it stays editable. You can edit the paths and the fill follows. I can't tell you how often this has saved my rear.

Have you ever really used appearances, vector effects and layers in Illustrator? I mean, really? CorelDRAW has some live effects, but they don't allow what Illustrator's appearance/layer combination allows. If you have never really used Illustrator, you won't understand that.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 03, 2020

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Just pulling the corner handle is how scaling works in Illustrator.

Are you trying to troll the forum?

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Explorer ,
Dec 03, 2020

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Scaling means "proportional scaling" of course. To this in illustrator you have to add shift. Anyway if you want to get stuck on this point alone and want to disregard everything els I pointed out: I don't care if you walk around the block each time you press a key...

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 03, 2020

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oh, yes, great difference. In Corel you move the corner handle for uniform scaling and move it with ALT pressed for non-uniform one. In Illustrator you move the corner handler for non-uniform scaling and move it with SHIFT pressed for uniform one. In Corel the action bases on "alternative" term, in Illustrator — on "lock" one. The both are quite natural. The frequency of the both scaling modes is more or less the same. Do I understand well that pressing ALT is more ergonomic than pressing SHIFT?
We can review the same way any tool or feature in each program and find that all ergonomic hates are based on our habits, nothing more. No program is totally better or worse, but just more or less suitable for a specific task. Honestly, I can't see a reason of this discussion here, it looks like a debate for debate. 

But, since we use an Adobe soft, we can discuss an Adobe's pricing strategy or request features, who forbid?

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Guide ,
Jul 08, 2018

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I might be wrong, but it sounds like the learning curve is what you are having problems with, rather than not having everything under one roof, there's really no way around that other than to put the hours in - preferably on a course, rather than during projects.

There are a couple of  all in one software, but they are no easier to learn.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 19, 2020

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Aha, as one printmaster sais me onse, "Nowadays Graphic Designer is the one who installed Corel Draw on his comp" 🙂
Well, in 1991 I started working in Graphic Design with Corel Draw (1.0). I worked with Corel, increasing my skills meanwhile Corel made its updates. Since Illustrator's appearance I had them (C-Draw and Illustrator) together on my comp for a while and chose the program depending on the project. So you can't say that I don't know the subject 🙂

10 years ago or so I completely finished using Corel Draw because of its non-ergonomic interface and endless searching for a way to do something simple (e.g. trigg from Select tool to Type tool without using Tool panel or any hotkeys). And I even don't speak now about work with colors, it's a very special headache in Corel soft when you want to print something.
And I must say that Illustrator is better for most of Graphic Design purposes, exclude the diagrams. Yes, this part is weak, and you have to choose another soft for it.

And yes, Illustrator hides some extra functions from beginners. And I think it's right. You have to increase your skills and overall understanding before unsing them. As a teacher, I've seen too many cases when beginners had too wide range of features open from the start: they used it for creating somehing really ugly. But when you are ready to use some extra features, nobody can stop you from adjusting the workflow and workspace like you want 🙂

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