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Create bottle label with projection

Community Beginner ,
Dec 20, 2019

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I'd like to create a round label for a bottle of beer, but I don't want it to be round when flat (= before sticking it to the bottle), I want it to be the projection of a flat circle onto the round bottle.

In other words, the shape to be cut would be the intersection of two perpendicular cylinders.

Any idea how to do this in Illustrator?

Thanks

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Correct answer by Jacob Bugge | Most Valuable Participant

Dude,

 

It is worse than you believe, but it can be done, undoubtedly easily with other software, or with the aid of external means.

 

Viewing straight on is presumed.

 

To give a circular appearance when viewed on the bottle, the label has to be stretched sideways, however not as an ellipse because the stretching increases outwards.

 

The whole shape including the actual stetching and sideways extension depends on how far the label goes round the bottle. A small label will be almost circular, and a large label going up to halfway round will be strecthed to a high degree.

 

The exact right appearance also depends on whther you view it with one (dominant) eye or with stereo vision. As an easy, and reasonable, approach closest to the latter, you may work without perspective.

 

You can, using no other software:

 

1) On the Artboard Draw the circle at full size and add a number of equidistant vertical guide lines through it from side to side (including one through the centre), maybe 9 lines to give 8 intervals, 4 on both side of the centre, then also add lines at half the bottle width in both sides;

2) Print out 1) on a piece of paper and put it on the table;

3) Wrap another piece of paper round the bottle so it reaches the bottom, then place it symmetrically over the lines (so the bottle width lines are at the sides of the bottle, and mark where the guide lines meet the bottle;

4) Unwrap the second piece of paper and measure how far the outer line marks are from the centre mark on both sides and use the best fit;

5) Back on the Artboard, create a copy of 1) with the centre vertical line going through the origin (at X = 0), then add a wide horizontal line vertically above the original circle;

6) Select the circle and the guide lines except the outermost ones, then use Pathfinder>Divide or the Shape Builder and get rid of all the unneeded bits so you only have (one each of) the shortened guide lines that were inside the circle, then Object>Path>Add Anchor Points;

7) ClickDrag each of the shortened guide lines by the midpoint to snap to the horizontal line;

8 ) ClickDrag the remaining outermost unchanged guide lines and then each of the shortened guide lines horizontally outwards to the distances measured in 4);

 

Now you have a basis for the unfolded shape, which runs through the ends of the guide lines and reaches the intersection of the horizontal line and the outermost unchanged guide lines

 

9) Create an ellipse and distort it in whichever suitable ways to get the best possible fit over the guides in 8);

 

You may print it out and wrap it round the bottle to see whether it is satisfactory;

 

10) Create/recreate the contents of the label similarly.

 

 

.

 

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Create bottle label with projection

Community Beginner ,
Dec 20, 2019

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I'd like to create a round label for a bottle of beer, but I don't want it to be round when flat (= before sticking it to the bottle), I want it to be the projection of a flat circle onto the round bottle.

In other words, the shape to be cut would be the intersection of two perpendicular cylinders.

Any idea how to do this in Illustrator?

Thanks

Most Valuable Participant
Correct answer by Jacob Bugge | Most Valuable Participant

Dude,

 

It is worse than you believe, but it can be done, undoubtedly easily with other software, or with the aid of external means.

 

Viewing straight on is presumed.

 

To give a circular appearance when viewed on the bottle, the label has to be stretched sideways, however not as an ellipse because the stretching increases outwards.

 

The whole shape including the actual stetching and sideways extension depends on how far the label goes round the bottle. A small label will be almost circular, and a large label going up to halfway round will be strecthed to a high degree.

 

The exact right appearance also depends on whther you view it with one (dominant) eye or with stereo vision. As an easy, and reasonable, approach closest to the latter, you may work without perspective.

 

You can, using no other software:

 

1) On the Artboard Draw the circle at full size and add a number of equidistant vertical guide lines through it from side to side (including one through the centre), maybe 9 lines to give 8 intervals, 4 on both side of the centre, then also add lines at half the bottle width in both sides;

2) Print out 1) on a piece of paper and put it on the table;

3) Wrap another piece of paper round the bottle so it reaches the bottom, then place it symmetrically over the lines (so the bottle width lines are at the sides of the bottle, and mark where the guide lines meet the bottle;

4) Unwrap the second piece of paper and measure how far the outer line marks are from the centre mark on both sides and use the best fit;

5) Back on the Artboard, create a copy of 1) with the centre vertical line going through the origin (at X = 0), then add a wide horizontal line vertically above the original circle;

6) Select the circle and the guide lines except the outermost ones, then use Pathfinder>Divide or the Shape Builder and get rid of all the unneeded bits so you only have (one each of) the shortened guide lines that were inside the circle, then Object>Path>Add Anchor Points;

7) ClickDrag each of the shortened guide lines by the midpoint to snap to the horizontal line;

8 ) ClickDrag the remaining outermost unchanged guide lines and then each of the shortened guide lines horizontally outwards to the distances measured in 4);

 

Now you have a basis for the unfolded shape, which runs through the ends of the guide lines and reaches the intersection of the horizontal line and the outermost unchanged guide lines

 

9) Create an ellipse and distort it in whichever suitable ways to get the best possible fit over the guides in 8);

 

You may print it out and wrap it round the bottle to see whether it is satisfactory;

 

10) Create/recreate the contents of the label similarly.

 

 

.

 

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Dec 20, 2019 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 20, 2019

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Is the 3D Revolve effect with a round symbol mapped what you want?

Circle.png

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Dec 20, 2019 1
Community Beginner ,
Dec 20, 2019

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Not entirely sure, but thanks anyway.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 20, 2019

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Well, if the cylinder sections are circles, the intersection is a circle.

The label (before sticked to a bottle) can have the shape of an ellipse or when axis are equal, a circle.

Maybe your questions is how to and how it will look when sticked in a 3D bottle?

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Dec 20, 2019 1
Community Beginner ,
Dec 20, 2019

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Yeah., I'm looking for a solution that would allow the label to look as round as possible when seen straight from the front, but I don't know how to create the correct elipse based on the diameter of the bottle and the circle.

Thanks if you have a solution.

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Dec 20, 2019 0
Most Valuable Participant ,
Dec 20, 2019

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Dude,

 

It is worse than you believe, but it can be done, undoubtedly easily with other software, or with the aid of external means.

 

Viewing straight on is presumed.

 

To give a circular appearance when viewed on the bottle, the label has to be stretched sideways, however not as an ellipse because the stretching increases outwards.

 

The whole shape including the actual stetching and sideways extension depends on how far the label goes round the bottle. A small label will be almost circular, and a large label going up to halfway round will be strecthed to a high degree.

 

The exact right appearance also depends on whther you view it with one (dominant) eye or with stereo vision. As an easy, and reasonable, approach closest to the latter, you may work without perspective.

 

You can, using no other software:

 

1) On the Artboard Draw the circle at full size and add a number of equidistant vertical guide lines through it from side to side (including one through the centre), maybe 9 lines to give 8 intervals, 4 on both side of the centre, then also add lines at half the bottle width in both sides;

2) Print out 1) on a piece of paper and put it on the table;

3) Wrap another piece of paper round the bottle so it reaches the bottom, then place it symmetrically over the lines (so the bottle width lines are at the sides of the bottle, and mark where the guide lines meet the bottle;

4) Unwrap the second piece of paper and measure how far the outer line marks are from the centre mark on both sides and use the best fit;

5) Back on the Artboard, create a copy of 1) with the centre vertical line going through the origin (at X = 0), then add a wide horizontal line vertically above the original circle;

6) Select the circle and the guide lines except the outermost ones, then use Pathfinder>Divide or the Shape Builder and get rid of all the unneeded bits so you only have (one each of) the shortened guide lines that were inside the circle, then Object>Path>Add Anchor Points;

7) ClickDrag each of the shortened guide lines by the midpoint to snap to the horizontal line;

8 ) ClickDrag the remaining outermost unchanged guide lines and then each of the shortened guide lines horizontally outwards to the distances measured in 4);

 

Now you have a basis for the unfolded shape, which runs through the ends of the guide lines and reaches the intersection of the horizontal line and the outermost unchanged guide lines

 

9) Create an ellipse and distort it in whichever suitable ways to get the best possible fit over the guides in 8);

 

You may print it out and wrap it round the bottle to see whether it is satisfactory;

 

10) Create/recreate the contents of the label similarly.

 

 

.

 

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Dec 20, 2019 1
Community Beginner ,
Dec 20, 2019

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Fantastic!

Thank you a million!

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Dec 20, 2019 0
Most Valuable Participant ,
Dec 20, 2019

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You are welcome, Dude,

 

I just completed the description, so it ends with 10).

 

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Mentor ,
Dec 21, 2019

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I approach it a little differently.  I would go and buy a few bottles of whatever beer has a round label on it.  I have an old school technique of removing the label using adhesive remover.  Using one of the other bottles,, I would take a digital pic of the front.  You do not have to, but this pic could be used as the "base" layer of your design ( remove all elements except the shape of the label and the bottle itself ).  Using the removed label, you could scan it  against a black background to give you the shape as "flat" which you could then build a "dieline" to be used to cut the label later.  Odds are you will need to warp whatever elelments you build on your "comp" ( your file that has the base layer of the bottle pic ).  You are essentially building a prototype of the entire design using a bottle with beer inside. So, so far, you have two files: 1.) one with a base layer of the pic; 2.) one with the label flat as a dieline.  When you get to the point where you have to generate a production file, the dieline will be put on a separate layer in the production file which will be flat.  The advantage to doing the dieline in the comp phase is the size and shape can be established and used as reference for your comp file ( which is a digital pic of the bottle and label shape as seen from the front [ of an existing bottle you bought at the packy ] ).  Also, there are two ways you could proceed: 1.) use the dieline file ( flat ) as your layout which can be presented or reviewed as printouts; or 2.) comp the 3-D bottle as your comp file to be preented later on.  Either way, elements can be copied and pasted to eachother, but the comp would be warped.  At some point you may have to cut the label and adhere it to a bottle.  The dieline file will work for that purpose.  Preliminary layouts could be printed of the comp file.  Whatever gets approved, you then build using the dieline file.  A few steps, but this would be my approach.  There really is no way that is correct or incorrect, it ends up being what you are comfortable with.  I can remember when we had to do markers by hand.

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Dec 21, 2019 0
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