Exporting a large file at 300dpi to jpeg format

New Here ,
Jan 24, 2018 Jan 24, 2018

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There is a website Society6 that I want to upload some artwork to and put it on products to sell. They have a minimum size of 6300 px. x 6300 px @ 72dpi RGB color in Jpeg format. Why they want jpegs I don't know. My problem is since they are going to be printing from a jpeg format I wanted to keep the res. @ 300dpi . My files were 10,000px. x 10,000 px. and when I try to export them to make them a jpeg. Illustrator tells me the res. is to high I have to lower it. I contacted Society6 they suggested I make the dimensions 6300 x 6300 and see if that works and it did not. The file sizes I am working on are around 960kb. It did export at 150dpi. but I'm fearful it might not print well.  Suggestions?

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correct answers 1 Correct Answer

Adobe Community Professional , Jan 25, 2018 Jan 25, 2018
if you want to end up with a 300ppi, 10,000 px square image from Illustrator, you need to start with the physical size of that image, not the pixel dimensions -- so 846.67 mm square.then Export As > JPEG, and check 'Use Artboards'. set to 300 ppi. barring any rounding errors in converting from px to mm, you should get what you specified.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 24, 2018 Jan 24, 2018

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This is an issue with Illustrator. You can get around it by using Photoshop.

From Illustrator choose File > Export As and choose Photoshop from the Save as type list.

Open the resulting file in Photoshop and save to jpeg as needed.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 25, 2018 Jan 25, 2018

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if you want to end up with a 300ppi, 10,000 px square image from Illustrator, you need to start with the physical size of that image, not the pixel dimensions -- so 846.67 mm square.

then Export As > JPEG, and check 'Use Artboards'. set to 300 ppi. barring any rounding errors in converting from px to mm, you should get what you specified.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 25, 2018 Jan 25, 2018

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sorry, that's 846.66 mm.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 25, 2018 Jan 25, 2018

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and 300 ppi is probably overkill for an 80cm square image, so i wouldn't worry about going lower.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 25, 2018 Jan 25, 2018

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LRKLinda  schrieb

They have a minimum size of 6300 px. x 6300 px @ 72dpi

If they tell you to make it 6300px x 6300 px then resolution doesn't matter. At all.

6300 pixels stay 6300 pixels no matter if the resolution is 12 ppi or 30,000 ppi (which is the highest resolution you can set in Photoshop).

Please learn about resolution.

Set up a file: vector or raster, resolution, color mode and file format

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 25, 2018 Jan 25, 2018

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this we know, but sites have odd requirements like this all over the place. Adobe stock even asks you to submit vector files at a 'resolution' of 15 megapixels

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 25, 2018 Jan 25, 2018

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https://forums.adobe.com/people/Doug+A+Roberts  schrieb

this we know, but sites have odd requirements like this all over the place.

Because they don't know the basics either. They probably even delete the resolution setting in the process of uploading.

Nobody even cares about learning basics these days.

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Community Beginner ,
Nov 30, 2020 Nov 30, 2020

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I have a similar issue. From your explanation, I don't understand where 846.67mm came from? Please could you explain this. Thank you!

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 30, 2020 Nov 30, 2020

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If there are 300 pixels per inch (PPI), then there are 10,000 pixels in 846.67 mm (33.333... inches)

 

(The original poster had 10,000 px square files)

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Community Beginner ,
Nov 30, 2020 Nov 30, 2020

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Ooo i see, is there a formula or a way to figure this out for different dimensions. For example, if I wanted a 3500px x 3500px sized JPEG file at 300dpi.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 30, 2020 Nov 30, 2020

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The formula is just your pixel dimensions (3500) divided by 300, which is 11.666 (recurring) inches.

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Community Beginner ,
Dec 01, 2020 Dec 01, 2020

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Thank you so much for your help!

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