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how can i make png files not rasterized

Community Beginner ,
Sep 10, 2020

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Ive recently switched from inkscape to adobe illustrator but i wanted to clip a text to a image it worked but it was bad quality, why does inkscape make the png files colors mixed and you cant see pixels so the clipping looks much better quality is their a way to fix this? Here are the image diffrence of inkscape and illustrator, Thanks!inkscapeinkscapeillustratorillustrator

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Correct answer by ElEgY | Community Beginner

I'm echoing Monica again.

Inkscape seems to blur the hard edges of the pixels in the video you shared. They're still there, though.

It's best to start a design with higher quality images, but if you need to enlarge a low quality image you can do so in Photoshop, where it will resample the image (pretty much the same as blurring the pixels). It will still pixelate at high zoom, but all images do this.

The goal is to have an image that appears "unpixelated" at the size the artwork is intended to be viewed. This is about 300ppi for print, and 72-200ppi for screen.

When you're creating a path to clip an image, it's important to "feather" the edges of the mask. Feathering blurs the edges of the clipped image so they don't appear jagged.

 

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how can i make png files not rasterized

Community Beginner ,
Sep 10, 2020

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Ive recently switched from inkscape to adobe illustrator but i wanted to clip a text to a image it worked but it was bad quality, why does inkscape make the png files colors mixed and you cant see pixels so the clipping looks much better quality is their a way to fix this? Here are the image diffrence of inkscape and illustrator, Thanks!inkscapeinkscapeillustratorillustrator

Community Beginner
Correct answer by ElEgY | Community Beginner

I'm echoing Monica again.

Inkscape seems to blur the hard edges of the pixels in the video you shared. They're still there, though.

It's best to start a design with higher quality images, but if you need to enlarge a low quality image you can do so in Photoshop, where it will resample the image (pretty much the same as blurring the pixels). It will still pixelate at high zoom, but all images do this.

The goal is to have an image that appears "unpixelated" at the size the artwork is intended to be viewed. This is about 300ppi for print, and 72-200ppi for screen.

When you're creating a path to clip an image, it's important to "feather" the edges of the mask. Feathering blurs the edges of the clipped image so they don't appear jagged.

 

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Draw and design, Feature request

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 10, 2020

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Hi may be there is difference in zoon level for both pictures zoom out and check...regards

Ali Sajjad

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Community Beginner ,
Sep 10, 2020

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No, inkscape will blend the colors this is a example of when I zoom in to the max, Thanks, Michele Awada.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 10, 2020

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PNG files are pixel based images. So what you want is impossible.

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Community Beginner ,
Sep 10, 2020

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Hi Whiz,

 

I suspect the "PNG" shown above in Inkscape is actually rendering from the original SVG (Inkscape's native file type). As Monika mentioned, any PNG you export from this will be rasterized by nature.

 

In order to retain the lossless vector gradient, you might try exporting the original from Inkscape as a PDF or SVG (EPS might work but you will lose transparency). With the right file export settings this should avoid rasterizing the gradient effects and allow you to make edits with Illustrator.

 

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Community Beginner ,
Sep 14, 2020

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Hi, I dont think it worked heres a video of what i mean because maybe I didnt write it right and theirs a misunderstanding anyway 

Inkscape look like its pixelated but when you zoom in its like gradients as you said, Thanks.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 14, 2020

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Inkscape renders raster images differently. It blurs them while doing so.

Illustrator doesn't.

 

Inkscape doesn't improve the PNG quality, it just hides it from you.

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Community Beginner ,
Sep 14, 2020

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Ok, but is their a way i can change illustrators rendering?

Because when im clipping images in inkscape it looks much better quality but with illustrator you can see the pixels which makes it unprofessional, Thanks

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 14, 2020

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I'd rather see and get better images to work with.

You can also try and apply a blur effect.

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Community Beginner ,
Sep 14, 2020

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I'm echoing Monica again.

Inkscape seems to blur the hard edges of the pixels in the video you shared. They're still there, though.

It's best to start a design with higher quality images, but if you need to enlarge a low quality image you can do so in Photoshop, where it will resample the image (pretty much the same as blurring the pixels). It will still pixelate at high zoom, but all images do this.

The goal is to have an image that appears "unpixelated" at the size the artwork is intended to be viewed. This is about 300ppi for print, and 72-200ppi for screen.

When you're creating a path to clip an image, it's important to "feather" the edges of the mask. Feathering blurs the edges of the clipped image so they don't appear jagged.

 

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Most Valuable Participant ,
Sep 14, 2020

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Michele,

 

Maybe too silly, but how about just recreating it as AI vector artwork?

 

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