How to create custom borders like classic Atari Arcade flyers, in Illustrator

Explorer ,
Jan 30, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hello all...I am somewhat of a beginner in Illustrator, but I feel like if I can at least solve this "mystery" I can overcome a hurdle and learn more about this awesome program

 

I want to create multi-colored lined borders like what you see in these classic "old school" arcade game flyers BELOW...

It's a design motif used by Atari in their classic Arcade cabinets/marquees on the video games,  and they used the same design style in these flyers...various colored lines are traced around as a border, almost like a road on a mapJC atari_attempt.jpg, syncronized in straight lines, curves, etc

 

In Illustrator I have been trying to use the Arc tool and or Line tool to create the curved corners..but when I try to "stretch" out the ends to make the lines go straight, the curve is not smooth/continuous...I cannot quite figure out how to get illustrator to make a straight line a curve and then back to a straight line again in a different direction, as seen here

 

How can this style of borders be created in Illustrator  (Tools used, etc?)-

 

MUCH THANKS

Asteroids.jpgCentipede.jpgpool.jpg

TOPICS
Draw and design, How to, Tools

Views

115

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Reply
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
TheKapp AUTHOR
Explorer ,
Jan 30, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Just to explain better what I've tried so far...

 

  1. I will use line tool to just make the straight lines in varied colors
  2. Bump up the stroke size to create "fat" lines
  3. Use the Arc tool to create the curves... Stroke size and color matched
  4. As can be seen in my example, these items are not one continuous line
  5. ...the broken line can easily be seen

 

I feel like theres a way to create an arc and then just "stretch" the top and bottom of the arc out, and have those lines be at 90 degree angles to the artboard's corners...

 

THANKS ALL for any suggestions

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Reply
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Mentor ,
Jan 30, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Each one of your samples are significantly different.  Each one would have its own approach.  Given that, you have a few different options at your disposal.  One is to create a brush using a segment of the border.  Then, create a rounded rectangle and apply the brush to that.  Those samples are each custom artwork.  I would print each one as large as you can using whatever printer you have available.  This will give you a chance to measure corner radius diameters to be applied throughout.  In your first sample. I would create the outside corner radius using the ellipse tool ( say one inch ) at around 12pt stroke, no fill.  Discard top anchor point and right anchor point, should leave you with a corner.  Select that segment and use Offset Path > experiement until you get the spacing you want > repeat for the third segment.  When you have the three corner segments done, select all > covert to paths.  You will now duplicate the three segments for each corner of your design ( if necessary ).  You can now extend the ends of the corner to reach its destination.  So, I have given you two ways to achieve the first sample: one using a brush, one creating the corner manually.  Again, each sample is considerably different.  You can also create a tracing Layer to help follow along the original artwork ( Place the image or artwork on a Layer, then create another Layer to use for your tracing ( artwork ).

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Reply
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
TheKapp AUTHOR
Explorer ,
Jan 30, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

This is incredible advice...

Major thanks!    

...I will try these processes out!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Reply
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Most Valuable Participant ,
Jan 31, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Kapp,

 

For the asymmetrical paths in ATARI and ASTEROIDS, simple use of Art Brushes would seem an obvious choice as mentioned by John.

 

For the symmetrical paths in CENTIPEDE and POOLSHARK, you can use either Art Brushes or multiple Strokes, along with negative/inward Offset Path to get much of the shapes, with some afterwork including rounding, cutting/(re)joining, and copying (parts), and in CENTIPEDE an overlap of the yellow cenrtre band, and also Knockout Group based on a 0 Opacity outer part of the yellow(ish) path for POOLSHARK, to obtain (something close to) the appearances shown.

 

Below, you can see steps/layers in creating a crude Knockout Group sample corresponding to the top of the POOLSHARK.

 

 

 

Click Here to see in Chrome 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Reply
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
TheKapp AUTHOR
Explorer ,
Jan 31, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

@Jacob Bugge much thanks!

 

I will review some tutorials on those tools...that should help me to get a jump forward in creating this

 

(i.e. Art Brushes and setting Offset path)

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Reply
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
TheKapp AUTHOR
Explorer ,
Feb 01, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Alright...Been utilizing some of these techniques...creating a shape, deleting some of the anchor poinbts to get curved corners, then creating lines and jpining them to the path...

 

I am finding that I do seem to need to do some math to pick the correct size of circle to get this to work

 

However, getting there!

 

Here's a sample (having some fun here)

 

arcade.jpg

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Reply
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Most Valuable Participant ,
Feb 01, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Kapp,

 

As long as you use the Offset Path, Illy (Job description Adobe Illustrator) does the math for you, and she knows it by heart.

 

I believe there is no need to delete Anchor Points to round corners. If it cannot be done with Rounded Rectangles or Corner Widgets, you can use the free Round Any Corner (by 佐藤浩之, Satō Hiroyuki), available here along with many other valuable ones:


http://shspage.com/aijs/en/

 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Reply
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
TheKapp AUTHOR
Explorer ,
Feb 03, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Allright, all

 

I thank you all again...

 

I now have learend and understand how to use Offset Paths in combo with rounded rectangles, setting Miter, and deleting SOME anchor points

 

And, we've got "Retro early 80's stripe borders"

This is awesome...I'll be  getting more knowledgeable on using this, including knockout groups, but here's one more sample - Major thanks to all on this

asports.jpg

 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Reply
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Most Valuable Participant ,
Feb 03, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

For my part you are welcome, Kapp.

 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Reply
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more