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How to match a color at 100% opacity with color at 50% opacity?

New Here ,
Sep 24, 2020

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I am trying to match two colors for a diagram I am making.  One is a solid color the other is at 50% opacity to show some text and linework below.  Both are on a white background, is there a way to match the 50% opacity one top of white to the solid color?

Screen Shot 2020-09-24 at 2.28.46 PM.png

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How to match a color at 100% opacity with color at 50% opacity?

New Here ,
Sep 24, 2020

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I am trying to match two colors for a diagram I am making.  One is a solid color the other is at 50% opacity to show some text and linework below.  Both are on a white background, is there a way to match the 50% opacity one top of white to the solid color?

Screen Shot 2020-09-24 at 2.28.46 PM.png

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Draw and design, How to

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Sep 24, 2020 0
Most Valuable Participant ,
Sep 24, 2020

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Marco Emilio,

 

I am afraid you can only make the desired match in greyscale by having identical reversed percentages of K value and Opacity, such as 50% K at 100% Opacity along with 100% K at 50% Opacity.

 

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Sep 24, 2020 0
New Here ,
Sep 24, 2020

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Thanks Jacob,  I was worried that may be the case. 

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Sep 24, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 24, 2020

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I am not sure if I understand what you are asking, but if you want a 100% color non transparent color that looks like the 50% transparent color, just select it and choose Object > Flaten Transparency...

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Sep 24, 2020 1
New Here ,
Sep 24, 2020

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Ton, thanks for the reply.  That is helpful! I hadn't used that function before; I think I will be able to use this. What I was orignally looking for was a way to go in the opposite direction.  Where I would start with an object and 'un-flaten' it so that it has 50% transparency, but has the same color as the original.  

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Sep 24, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 25, 2020

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As I suspected, I did not understand what you wanted.

You can try eyeballing the 50% color with the HSB sliders by changing the saturation and brightness.

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Sep 25, 2020 1
Most Valuable Participant ,
Sep 25, 2020

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Marco Emilio,

 

Actually, I came to think that it will sometimes be possible to at least get close for certain pale to mid tone colours:

 

You can try this, starting with the desired 100% opacity colour:

 

1) Move a copy of the path with the colour and set the Opacity as desired (as you have in the screenshot/image);

2) Switch to CMYK colours, but only in the Color palette; I am/have been assuming that you are working in RGB;

3) Select the original and (albeit only temporarily) clear the insignificant CMYK values (it can be one of the CMY and K) and change the significant ones to the nearest integer values (just to remember more easily), then insert higher values in the lower opacity copy and adjust the relevant C/M/Y values to get the best possible match;

4) Optionally, you may consider a certain adjustment of the original full opacity colour;

5) Switch back to RGB to get rid of the ugly colour values;

6) Optionally, you may fine tune the colours in RGB.

 

You can see a sample done hurriedly (without fine tuning) that way below; the dark one is the pale one at 100%.

 

Edit: My earlier (mis)conclusion was based on failed attempts with HSB, in line with the suggestion by Ton (which I saw when finally finishing this post); and then realized that the greyscale only way pointed at the similar CMYK way, both opposite to RGB.

 

 

 

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Sep 25, 2020 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 25, 2020

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Sep 25, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 25, 2020

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Darken mode is the easiest way when a white background is used.

Trying to adjust the 50% to mimic the original 100% color is a moving target and impossible with saturated colors.

https://shared-assets.adobe.com/link/b5019901-5ab7-4837-4be5-0c4d5f33e2cd

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Sep 25, 2020 1
New Here ,
Sep 25, 2020

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Thank you Kurt, that was exactly what I was looking for!

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Sep 25, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 25, 2020

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"Trying to adjust the 50% to mimic the original 100% color is a moving target and impossible with saturated colors."

 

Possibly it's possible, Ton.

 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/123QDl7-e-u95BctBcfdB3n-kEi5S7_CF/view?usp=sharing

 

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Sep 25, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 25, 2020

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That is something different.

You cannot adjust the 50% opacity color (C20 M0 Y100 K0) in your example to look like the 100% one.

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Sep 25, 2020 0