Highlighted

How to move one handle and no changing the angle or breaking the line

Community Beginner ,
Sep 07, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Extremlity_0-1599470840331.png

This picture is from Corel Draw. How to do it in Adobe Illustrator?
Left handle it should move to the left, the right handle must stay where it is without moving or breaking the line at the point. The angle must be the same. I tried Shift, Alt, Ctrl, and a combination, nothing helps.

Most Valuable Participant
Correct answer by Jacob Bugge | Most Valuable Participant

Extremlity,

 

Smart Guides being your friends (telling you when you are within snapping distance), a silly old way is to:

 

1) With the relevant (left) Handle visible (Direct Select the Anchor Point or the relevant (left) segment), ClickDrag with the Line Segment Tool from the Handle into the Anchor Point (that way because the Handle disappears);

2) Click the relevant Reference Point (in the case shown it is the top right) and multiply the W or H value by a suitable/ridiculous number (or set a value) and press Ctrl/Cmd+Enter to create a long (enough) guide line;

3) Direct Select the Anchor Point or the relevant (left) segment again, then ClickDrag the Handle as far as desired;

4) Delete the guide line from 2).

 

TOPICS
Draw and design, How to, Tools

Views

83

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more

How to move one handle and no changing the angle or breaking the line

Community Beginner ,
Sep 07, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Extremlity_0-1599470840331.png

This picture is from Corel Draw. How to do it in Adobe Illustrator?
Left handle it should move to the left, the right handle must stay where it is without moving or breaking the line at the point. The angle must be the same. I tried Shift, Alt, Ctrl, and a combination, nothing helps.

Most Valuable Participant
Correct answer by Jacob Bugge | Most Valuable Participant

Extremlity,

 

Smart Guides being your friends (telling you when you are within snapping distance), a silly old way is to:

 

1) With the relevant (left) Handle visible (Direct Select the Anchor Point or the relevant (left) segment), ClickDrag with the Line Segment Tool from the Handle into the Anchor Point (that way because the Handle disappears);

2) Click the relevant Reference Point (in the case shown it is the top right) and multiply the W or H value by a suitable/ridiculous number (or set a value) and press Ctrl/Cmd+Enter to create a long (enough) guide line;

3) Direct Select the Anchor Point or the relevant (left) segment again, then ClickDrag the Handle as far as desired;

4) Delete the guide line from 2).

 

TOPICS
Draw and design, How to, Tools

Views

84

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Sep 07, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 07, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

CorelDraw has its own shortcuts, sometimes unevident and strange, combined with functional keys. so it would be more useful to ask for them on some CDR forum, e.g. here: https://community.coreldraw.com/talk/

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Sep 07, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 07, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Anna, the question is that Corel allows you to do this by some key combination; what is the equiavalent in Illustrator?

Unfortunately, the answer is that there is no simple way to constrain like this in Illustrator.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Sep 07, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 07, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

ah, yes, I see now. Maybe this thing could be useful in some situations, but generally it's enough to keep an eye on the path behind the anchor point 🙂

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Sep 07, 2020 0
Most Valuable Participant ,
Sep 07, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Extremlity,

 

Smart Guides being your friends (telling you when you are within snapping distance), a silly old way is to:

 

1) With the relevant (left) Handle visible (Direct Select the Anchor Point or the relevant (left) segment), ClickDrag with the Line Segment Tool from the Handle into the Anchor Point (that way because the Handle disappears);

2) Click the relevant Reference Point (in the case shown it is the top right) and multiply the W or H value by a suitable/ridiculous number (or set a value) and press Ctrl/Cmd+Enter to create a long (enough) guide line;

3) Direct Select the Anchor Point or the relevant (left) segment again, then ClickDrag the Handle as far as desired;

4) Delete the guide line from 2).

 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Sep 07, 2020 0
Resources