How to Select All Connected Edges in Illustrator

Explorer ,
May 09, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi everyone!

I have imported a DWG drawing into Illustrator, where I have these paths. In 3D programs such as SketchUp, you can select one edge and then expand the selection to all connected/adjacent paths, as shown in the following GIF. In this particular example, you triple-click on an edge, which essentially selects all the connected edges.

Untitled Project.gif

Artboard 1.jpg

I'm wondering if there's a way, perhaps a plugin, that would allow me to select adjacent/connected paths of a selection in Illustrator. This would save a lot of time. Thanks a lot in advance for your help.

Hi,

Indeed Sketch gives only non-joined strokes. What I use to solve that problem is to convert your artwork to Life paint and use the Life Painting Bucket to fill it temporarily with a colour, then expand, then erase all those non-joined garbage an ad a stroke to it. Then eventually erase fills and maintain only the stroke.

Done without a script.

Good luck

Views

1.7K

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more

How to Select All Connected Edges in Illustrator

Explorer ,
May 09, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi everyone!

I have imported a DWG drawing into Illustrator, where I have these paths. In 3D programs such as SketchUp, you can select one edge and then expand the selection to all connected/adjacent paths, as shown in the following GIF. In this particular example, you triple-click on an edge, which essentially selects all the connected edges.

Untitled Project.gif

Artboard 1.jpg

I'm wondering if there's a way, perhaps a plugin, that would allow me to select adjacent/connected paths of a selection in Illustrator. This would save a lot of time. Thanks a lot in advance for your help.

Hi,

Indeed Sketch gives only non-joined strokes. What I use to solve that problem is to convert your artwork to Life paint and use the Life Painting Bucket to fill it temporarily with a colour, then expand, then erase all those non-joined garbage an ad a stroke to it. Then eventually erase fills and maintain only the stroke.

Done without a script.

Good luck

Views

1.7K

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
May 09, 2019 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 09, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

If you're looking for a script or plugin, you could try Join Reasonably s.h's page : Scripts for Adobe Illustrator CS

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
May 09, 2019 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 09, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

If you only want to select the paths, but not join them, in Illustrator you can select a path and under the Select > Object menu, there are many choices for selecting similar objects.

If the paths are grouped, and if there are groups within groups, in Illustrator you can select a group by clicking it once with the Group Selection tool, and then every time you click the same object again, Illustrator selects the next group up in the hierarchy.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
May 09, 2019 1
Enthusiast ,
May 09, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Here's a video clip of me showing you how to join lines into one object

Path-Join-Movie.mov - Google Drive

You can approach it this way, selecting all the paths that were created and using the Object > Path > Join feature. As long as the anchors are close enough, when it expands it will join them. At the end of the video I show how you can use the direct select to select to points and use join to auto-draw the connection.

You can also use the join tool if you want to go around the object and bridge anchors together more manually.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
May 09, 2019 1
Contributor ,
May 10, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi,

Indeed Sketch gives only non-joined strokes. What I use to solve that problem is to convert your artwork to Life paint and use the Life Painting Bucket to fill it temporarily with a colour, then expand, then erase all those non-joined garbage an ad a stroke to it. Then eventually erase fills and maintain only the stroke.

Done without a script.

Good luck

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
May 10, 2019 0
Explorer ,
May 10, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi everyone!

Thanks for the replies.

Barbara Ash​, I wish the paths were grouped but although in the SketchUp file they are grouped when I export a separate DWG, Illustrator doesn't get the groups. I looked through all the commands under the Select menu before making the post but there were none that would suit the issue.

mark-heaps​, thank you for your input. Although I know how to join paths in Illy (not a novice with the program, haha), the box selection method that you show in the video is exactly the problem - if you try to select the paths that make up the V shape in my example with a box selection, other paths will also fall into that selection, namely the paths from the shape above the V. That's the problem. Box selection will not help. One could hypothetically achieve it with the Lasso tool, yes. But if you have a complicated outline, Lasso selection would also eventually fail.

thepatje  wrote

Indeed Sketch gives only non-joined strokes.

By Sketch, you mean the vector editor software or SketchUp, the 3D modeling program? Because my gif was from SketchUp and I got a little confused by your answer, haha.
You're right, the quickest and best solution would be to use the Live Paint tool to fill in the space and expand etc. However, there is a rather nagging bug in Illustrator since version CS6 if I'm not wrong, concerning the Life Paint tool. Here's an issue I filed in Adobe's Illustrator Bug Report page, that describes the bug - Expanding a Live Paint Object Changes Dimensions – Adobe Illustrator Feedback

I wish I could use the Life Paint tool, but this particular bug hinders me from doing it.

In the end I ended up selecting the paths making the V one by one, joined them, then moved to the other silhouette and did the same. Here's the result:
Screenshot 2.png

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
May 10, 2019 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 10, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I tried comparing the dimensions of a live paint object before and after it was converted to live paint. In Illustrator CS6 there was a tiny difference in the dimensions. In Illustrator CC 2019, there was no difference in the dimensions.

Do you find that the dimensions always change or just on some live paint objects?

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
May 10, 2019 0
Explorer ,
May 10, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

The dimensions always change for me. And it doesn't matter, whether I've imported DWG paths or created them in Illustrator, they always mess up when I click Expand Live Paint. My preview bounds is also turned off. My current version of Illustrator is 2018 (22.0.1).

Here's a video. (I hope I attached it correctly.)

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
May 10, 2019 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 10, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thanks for the video. However, it is difficult to see what the numbers are in the video because they are so small. It looks like the fills and strokes are being separated. I didn't try it with stroked objects, but I can see why that would cause different overall dimensions when the fill is separated because the stroke would either be centered, inside, or outside the edge of the path.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
May 10, 2019 0
Explorer ,
May 10, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I went and edited the captured video and uploaded again. Hope you can see the numbers now. https://youtu.be/GseIQGalF28

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
May 10, 2019 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 10, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thanks for taking the time to redo the video. Although I did see this dimension change slightly using CS6, I cannot replicate it in CC 2019, 23.0.3.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
May 10, 2019 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 10, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

It looks like you want to make closed shapes by joining the paths. You can do that by selecting all the paths, selecting the Shape Builder Tool (Shift + M) and clicking on the enclosed area. How to create shapes using the Shape Builder tool in Illustrator

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
May 10, 2019 0
Resources