Illustrator 3D Problem

New Here ,
Dec 12, 2017 Dec 12, 2017

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Hello guys,My name is Dejan Dinov,and i'm a Logo Designer.

I need urgent help with this 3D problem i'm facing.

I'm working on this design that it's for a logo contest in a few days,so i need it done in 3D as well.

This is the 2D Vector Design.

Screenshot_8.png

This is the result when i go to Effects-3D

Screenshot_2.png

So,when i try to make the logo to Vector,all lines - When i go to Expand or Flatten Transparency,the logo is converted to Outlines,but this happens and it really annoys me.

Screenshot_4.png

Screenshot_5.png

You see those white lines?As if the letter is separated,and yes i've tried some things from YouTube on how to fix this,but it doesn't work for me.

The second problem i'm facing is when i try to Unite these parts to single part.

Screenshot_6.png

I click Unite and this happens.The part disappears.

Screenshot_7.png

And last but not least,this really annoys me if anyone can help me to fix it.

Screenshot_9.png

And yes,this blue color is a stroke but look what happens when i Expand Or Flatten Transparency.

Dear Members,any help will be appreciated and i need help,fast.

Thank you,

Dejan.

PS:I have the design in Blue-Black and Orange-Black as well,and when i make them 3D the black part of the design doesn't have shading.If anyone can help me how to fix this also,will be very much appreciated

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correct answers 1 Correct Answer

LEGEND , Dec 13, 2017 Dec 13, 2017
You're working in an object-based program and with 2D vector paths. Even though 3D Effect is based on a 3D transformation, it is rendering to 2D vector paths (whereas most 3D programs commonly render to pixels). So you always need to try be aware of the actual 2D path constructs that you are dealing with in the output rendering. Your use of terminology indicates misconceptions about what you are actually dealing with.
You see those white lines?
To figure out what problems actually are, you need to...

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 12, 2017 Dec 12, 2017

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Well, bad news for you: You don't seem to understand the limitations of these fake 3D effects. Pretty much everything you see is to be expected. There are no easy solutions here. If you wanted to have consistent vector output, you would have to actually draw the objects from hand and match the perspective. As a minor, you will have to clean up your shapes and remove extraneous anchor points before merging them, but after that you may still need to use Pathfinder operations to mutually cut things out. and apply gradients to reinstitute the shading. Likewise, a black object will never have any shading because Illustrator can't shift the colors around on a black object. You would have to draw your gradients manually or use other methods to create highlights. So unless you seriously plan on investing much more work into this, you have to accept it as it is. There's really no simple fix for this. It's all just a lot of hard manual labor, give or take a few plug-ins like VectorScribe you could buy to help out with some steps.

Mylenium

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New Here ,
Dec 12, 2017 Dec 12, 2017

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Thank you for the reply.Mylenium.I will try harder to fix things.

Dejan.

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LEGEND ,
Dec 13, 2017 Dec 13, 2017

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You're working in an object-based program and with 2D vector paths. Even though 3D Effect is based on a 3D transformation, it is rendering to 2D vector paths (whereas most 3D programs commonly render to pixels). So you always need to try be aware of the actual 2D path constructs that you are dealing with in the output rendering. Your use of terminology indicates misconceptions about what you are actually dealing with.

You see those white lines?

To figure out what problems actually are, you need to deconstruct the rendering. Think and speak in terms of objects, because that's what you're dealing with. You can deconstruct the rendering to find out whether what you're calling a "white line" actually is. Is there actually a white-colored path there? Is it an actual gap between two separate paths which should perfectly abut? Or is it just an aberration of the raster based rendering to your monitor?

Usually, it's the latter. You can discern that simply by zooming. Does the "white line" get larger when you zoom in extremely, or does it stay the same size? Still not sure? Then do a test:

1. Draw two overlapping paths (two rectangles will do).

2. Fill the two paths with the same two colors involved in the area in question.

Does the "white line" occur when the two adjacent colors actually overlap? If so, it's just a screen rendering aberration of Illustrator's anti-aliasing; something Illustrator is notorious for.

The second problem...I click Unite and this happens.The part disappears.

Again, to educate yourself as to what is going on, you need to deconstruct the objects you are dealing with. A Unite operation by definition causes two or more paths to be replaced with one path. That means the resulting path will be at one location in the overall object stack of the document, whereas the two original paths may have been at different locations in the object stack. What you'll probably find here is that the Unite operation is causing part of the path to be obscured by other objects higher in the stack.

The vector rendering of 3D Effect can be a fairly complicated construct. You may find nested Groups, compound paths, and clipping paths.

And last...this really annoys me....And yes, this blue color is a stroke but look what happens when i Expand....

Your saying "yes, this blue color is a stroke but..." implies that you have read the admonition to avoid using Strokes on the base paths used in 3D Effect, but did it anyway and are now annoyed at the consequences. No offense, but that in itself is rather annoying.

Again: Think about what is actually going on. When you extrude a stroke, both sides of the stroke are being extruded. That means there is a high likelihood that you will have multiple coincident paths--often of different colors--being extruded in exactly the same place. That's begging for problems. The construct can result in ambiguity about which identical extrusion path should be in front.

This is the largest overall bad practice in your use of 3D Effect. The "face" of the square is another example. I suspect you did not use the surface mapping feature for that, but simply included the four rectangles (three while on top of one red) in the single extrusion, correct? If so, you are thinking of the white rectangles as "a flat drawing" that will just reside on the front surface of the red rectangle. But how would 3D Effect know that? Just as with extruded strokes, you have to realize you are asking 3D Effect to extrude one red and three white rectangles, again asking for path stacking-order problems. You should store the three white rectangles as a Symbol and map that Symbol to the front surface of the extruded red rectangle, not just include them in the base paths of the extrusion.

... the black part of the design doesn't have shading.

Note that part of the lighting feature of 3D Effect works by letting you select a color for the shade. The highlight side of the object is starting with some tinting (dependent upon your lighting setup) of the base path color and then adding black to it toward the darker surfaces. So with a black base path, the shading is starting with a moderate tint of black and adding black to it. There is some shading going on, it's just less apparent for very dark colors. So to compensate:

1. Go ahead and extrude the Group containing the several colors.

2. Adjust the lighting to your liking for it overall.

3. Commit the render.

4. White pointer: Select just  the base path of the black object that looks too flat.

5. Color palette: Drag the component color slider(s) to slightly lighten the base color of the black path. While doing so, watch the shaded side of the object to ensure that the darkest part of it stays full black.

JET

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