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Is there any way to apply thinner to all traces of a file?

Participant ,
Jun 23, 2020

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My workflow is long, what I am trying to do is uncommon.

 

In short, I am attempting to extract the 3 isometric views from a SketchUp 3D model into very accurate SVG files.

 

Please notice the attached PDF file. It comes from a "Plot" function, and is monochrome. The traces seem to be of a uniform width. What I need is a command that makes every trace very thin.

 

Is there such thing?

If you know how to accomplish this upstream in my workflow (AutoCAD), I will try that method as well.

 

TIA,

 

-Ramon F. Herrera

JFK Numbers

These traces need to go in a dietThese traces need to go in a diet

 

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by Doug A Roberts | Adobe Community Professional

It has output paths, so you can just select them and adjust the stroke width.

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Draw and design, How to, Import and export

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Is there any way to apply thinner to all traces of a file?

Participant ,
Jun 23, 2020

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My workflow is long, what I am trying to do is uncommon.

 

In short, I am attempting to extract the 3 isometric views from a SketchUp 3D model into very accurate SVG files.

 

Please notice the attached PDF file. It comes from a "Plot" function, and is monochrome. The traces seem to be of a uniform width. What I need is a command that makes every trace very thin.

 

Is there such thing?

If you know how to accomplish this upstream in my workflow (AutoCAD), I will try that method as well.

 

TIA,

 

-Ramon F. Herrera

JFK Numbers

These traces need to go in a dietThese traces need to go in a diet

 

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by Doug A Roberts | Adobe Community Professional

It has output paths, so you can just select them and adjust the stroke width.

TOPICS
Draw and design, How to, Import and export

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130

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Jun 23, 2020 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 24, 2020

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It has output paths, so you can just select them and adjust the stroke width.

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Jun 24, 2020 2
Participant ,
Jun 25, 2020

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"It has output paths, so you can just select them and adjust the stroke width."

Thanks, Doug:

Let's pretend for a second that I have betwen little and no clue about your suggestion:

(a) "It has output paths"

"Output paths"? As opposed to what other kind of path?


I know what paths are but how did you determine their existence in my files? Being ASCII-based, I can see paths in SVG files.

(b) "adjust the stroke width"

Even more embarrassing: how do I adjust the stroke width?

For the record, as a software engineer, I deal with SDKs. Not too log ago I wrote an application (for PDF files). It went into a loop and selected only the lines that were: (1) Not too short (2) Horizontal or (3) Vertical. Then it recognized grids. It was similar to OCR. In short: I am not clueeless in general, only as IIllustrator user.

 

Thanks!

-Ramon F. Herrera
JFK Numbers

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Jun 25, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 25, 2020

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When you have something on screen like the figure on the left it can be a shape or a path (with a thick stroke).

 

Bildschirmfoto 2020-06-25 um 12.45.37.png

 

To change the thickness of a stroke in Illustrator, go to Window > Stroke and then you will see the stroke width at the top of the panel.

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Jun 25, 2020 1
Participant ,
Jun 25, 2020

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Let me guess: If it is not closed, it can only be a path?

Path?Path?

 

 

-Ramon
JFK Numbers

 

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Jun 25, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 25, 2020

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Sorry, I didn't mean 'output paths' were a variety of path, but that your export has provided you with paths that you can adjust the stroke width of.

 

Are you implying you want to do this programmatically, rather than in the Illustrator UI? Because that would be outside of my expertise.

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Jun 25, 2020 1
Participant ,
Jun 25, 2020

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"Are you implying you want to do this programmatically, rather than in the Illustrator UI?"

I will do it with whatever works. My tool of last resort will be to roll my sleeves and do some programming. I have not done that in ages.

 

But it sounds like I will be able to solve this with the Illustrator UI.

 

This is the web based application that has 4 rather poor background images:

 

http://www.dealey-plaza.org/this-government-as-promised/SBT-MBT-Tools/Robertson_Measurement_Tool/ 


I have the most accurate laser measurements taken of that place, known as Dealey Plaza. The accuracy is 3mm. That is the internal data. Now I need visual images to match the precision. That was the reason I chose SVG.

 

Thanks!

 

-Ramon
JFK Numbers

 

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Jun 25, 2020 0