Highlighted

Live Paint vs regular Paint, re: paths

New Here ,
Aug 19, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I have an object that I want to color in, freehand. It will require a huge amount of brush strokes, as I am realistically rendering the object. I'm new to Illustrator, but I understand that a large volume of paths is bad (creates a huge file). Also, it is so difficult to sort through all of the individual strokes on the layers panel to identify them.

 

I'm trying to comprehend how Live Paint works- because it sounds like this tool will help me with this issue. I only have one shape to color in (every tutorial talks about using Fill to color in separate areas of the drawing. I do not want to use one fill). When I select my object and choose Live Paint, I see separate paths in my layers panel. Is that how it works? Will it still create a multitude of paths?  How is it different than regular Paint Brush strokes?

 

Or if I have a bunch of strokes, somehow locate all the ones I want to put into Live Paint.. what does that do exactly? What is the benefit of Live Paint vs regular Paint? I need help understanding the theory. I want to learn habits for submitting work professionally, so is an image with less paths the goal?

 

I want to be free to use as many strokes as I want without making a file that has too much information and can crash. 

 

Topics

Draw and design, How to, Tools

Views

68

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more

Live Paint vs regular Paint, re: paths

New Here ,
Aug 19, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I have an object that I want to color in, freehand. It will require a huge amount of brush strokes, as I am realistically rendering the object. I'm new to Illustrator, but I understand that a large volume of paths is bad (creates a huge file). Also, it is so difficult to sort through all of the individual strokes on the layers panel to identify them.

 

I'm trying to comprehend how Live Paint works- because it sounds like this tool will help me with this issue. I only have one shape to color in (every tutorial talks about using Fill to color in separate areas of the drawing. I do not want to use one fill). When I select my object and choose Live Paint, I see separate paths in my layers panel. Is that how it works? Will it still create a multitude of paths?  How is it different than regular Paint Brush strokes?

 

Or if I have a bunch of strokes, somehow locate all the ones I want to put into Live Paint.. what does that do exactly? What is the benefit of Live Paint vs regular Paint? I need help understanding the theory. I want to learn habits for submitting work professionally, so is an image with less paths the goal?

 

I want to be free to use as many strokes as I want without making a file that has too much information and can crash. 

 

Topics

Draw and design, How to, Tools

Views

69

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Aug 19, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 20, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Live paint is a shortcut that fills areas enclosed by paths; it has nothing to do with reducing the amount of paths in a file. Its benefit vs. filled shapes (I'm not sure what you mean by 'regular Paint') is as a timesaver.

An image with less paths is only a goal if the paths have become a problem in some way. Have they? What problems 'submitting' work (submitting work to what?) are you experiencing?

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Aug 20, 2020 0
New Here ,
Aug 20, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I'm actually trying to decipher what method to use to create my art- I'm really at a loss. I draw an outline of a shape, then I want to render it inside with multiple paint strokes. Is the purpose of Live Paint to keep the strokes inside the object? Is that why it is a time saver? I began by creating a clipping mask to keep the strokes inside the shape. Would Live Paint be better to use for this?

 

Please help me understand how the amount of paths affects a file. Tutorials say to make objects with simplified paths- and that is how you would submit your image for a job (to a client). Is that true? Or can I paint a picture with a million brush strokes? Is that ok? (Acceptable by industry standard?) 

 

My image would crash when I applied a 3D bevel and then tried to paint on the layer, so I wondered if too many tools, effects, paths would make a file too big or problematic? I just want to make my images but I don't want to learn wasteful habits. All of these questions are preventing me from making my art and it's so frustrating. Thank you so much for your reply, I really appreciate it.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Aug 20, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 20, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Please show your artwork.

And tell us how it will be used in production. Printed?

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Aug 20, 2020 0
New Here ,
Aug 20, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thanks for your reply, I'm going to soldier on 🙂 I may be back

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Aug 20, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 20, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

With this styles Live Paint doesn't help. Please read the helpx document I posted.

What you are creating is a lot of paths and points (as you already noticed). If it makes sense, depends on how you want it to look like. If this is what you want, then it makes sense.

 

You might need to convert it to pixels when sending to print or other kinds of production, because it will be difficult to handle.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Aug 20, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 20, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Aug 20, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 20, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Fills Live Paint, Gradient, Pattern, Solid Color.

In case it's not enough for illustration, I recommend Gradient Mesh to you.

Working with Live Paint gives a smoother look.

Graphic Designer Educator / PrePress Consultant

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Aug 20, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 20, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Many vector points are bad, but some looks can only be accomplished that way. Many artists use the paint brushed in Illustrator similar to real paint brushes and how large a file their computer can handle is a function of what kind of specs their computer has. Then the question is how that final project is being handed off - will it need to remain in vectors, can you save a copy as a pdf, etc. To paint with brushes is not in itself bad. Perhaps if you could load a sample of what you want you artwork to look like, we could better help you decide what tools to use to get the desired look.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Aug 20, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 20, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Looking at your image, you could try to combine Illustrator and Photoshop.

Draw the black strokes in Illustrator, copy or import them in Photoshop as a Smart Object.

Use Photoshop brushes to color the artwork on layers below the smart object.

In the end, combine the brushed Photoshop art with the vector strokes in Illustrator.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Aug 20, 2020 0