I received so many corrections to apply to my project : what is the best way to proceed?

Community Beginner ,
Jan 21, 2022 Jan 21, 2022

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Hello everyone at this Adobe affeftionates.  My name is Daniel, I am a newbie.  I'm starting to get acquainted with v. 17 and I find it difficult, mostly because I'm also using a macbookpro and it's also new to me 😮

 

 

Here is my question.

 

I got help in designing a flyer for an advertising communication piece I'm working on and I want to continue doing it by myself as I have all components of the flyer deliverd to me.

There were a lot of corrections to be made. The flyer went on a diet.  It was 1,060 words before and it came back to me with 550 words total, including titles, etc

Because I'm a newbie and I'm the FOMO type of guy, I thougt I should keep intact the version one and 'saves as' a new version.

The problem I have is about the location where I saved the version two.

 

If I created a new folder and saved the new version in that new folder, what should I do about the other files I did not really touched?

 

The way I asked the designer to deliver the flyer is by asking him to deposit all the file extensions and include everthing he worked on in the same zip folder so that my printer can go back and do small edits if there is a need.

Should I simply do a copy / paste of all the other files that accompany my flyer in this new folder and trust that I have everything?

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correct answers 1 Correct answer

Adobe Community Professional , Jan 21, 2022 Jan 21, 2022
  Should I simply do a copy / paste of all the other files that accompany my flyer in this new folder and trust that I have everything?
Good on you for wanting to save everything! But there's a much easier way.  While you are working on your design, you can save all of your InDesign files in the same folder, where I imagine you have a bunch of assets - some images for sure, and perhaps a Document Fonts folder? But when your InDesign file is final, go to File -> Package. This will allow y...

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 21, 2022 Jan 21, 2022

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Should I simply do a copy / paste of all the other files that accompany my flyer in this new folder and trust that I have everything?

 

 

Good on you for wanting to save everything! But there's a much easier way. 

 

While you are working on your design, you can save all of your InDesign files in the same folder, where I imagine you have a bunch of assets - some images for sure, and perhaps a Document Fonts folder? But when your InDesign file is final, go to File -> Package. This will allow you to save a new folder in a new location, with your final InDesign folder, an Images folder and a Document Fonts folder. InDesign will collect all the images and fonts your document uses (with a few exceptions - like Chinese/Japanese/Korean fonts - that most likely don't apply to you) to include in those folders. InDesign will do all the work, all you have to do is specify a location.  There will also be checkboxes that will allow you to automatically export a PDF and an IDML, if you so choose, to include with the package file that you will hand off to your printer, or to your client.

 

Likewise, if you want to make sure that you have everything, and leave the unused stuff behind, you can also package it for your own benefit, which will guarantee that all of your assets for this project are all in one (new) place. 

 

Lastly: I am not a newbie and have zero FOMO but I always save multiple versions of any file I'm working on. It's been invaluable, for all those times where the client says "Remember the layout from three months ago, with the logo we threw out? I want you to use that logo." Because who wants to recreate that half-remembered logo? All you need is a file-naming convention that you always use without fail. If you name things "blah-de-blah poster FINAL.indd" and it's not final, or if you have "blah-de-blah poster FINAL 2.indd" and "blah-de-blah poster FINAL 2 REALLY FINAL 3.indd", then the chances of going to print with something that is not final go up. 

 

 

 

 

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Community Beginner ,
Jan 21, 2022 Jan 21, 2022

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WOW. Thank you so much @Joel Cherney this answer really helps me and it reassures me a lot.

I did, since I was right in the process of saving the 'final' of my work, re-created manually a copy of the original.

Now, I won't continue this practice which was cumbersome.

Daniel.

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