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In Indesign, a glyph I export to Pub exports incorrectly

Community Beginner ,
Aug 22, 2021 Aug 22, 2021

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I have just uploaded my manuscript to Amazon KDP for a print book. It look fine.

 

But now I want to include an Epub, and when I export, one of my glyphs (a gecko from Geographica Hand) exports as xorn6x. Ant way to fix this, or must I change the font?

 

Thanks

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EPUB, Import and export

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correct answers 1 Correct answer

Adobe Community Professional , Aug 22, 2021 Aug 22, 2021
The glyph you've used — U 0078 + 006F + 0072 + 006E + 0036 + 0078 — is a compound glyph that's not accepted by EPUB, HTML, Accessible PDF, or other final digital file formats that I know.  It's a custom, non-standard glyph that's made of up several single glyphs to create the character you see (a gecko (?) from your screen shot). Standard Unicode glyphs (on OpenType fonts) are defined by only one set of 4 - 5 number/letters called a "codepoint." Your glyph has a group of 6 codepoints. Exampl...

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 22, 2021 Aug 22, 2021

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EUPBs require Unicode/OpenType fonts.

Check the properties of the version of Geographica Hand and make sure you see the words Unicode and/or OpenType.

 

From MyFont's website, it's available in both OpenType and TrueType versions. You might have the TrueType. https://www.myfonts.com/fonts/3ip/geographica-hand?tab=techSpecs

 

 

Bevi Chagnon | Designer & Technologist for Accessible InDesign + PDFs |
Books & Classes | PubCom

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 22, 2021 Aug 22, 2021

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Thank you for your response. I discovered that it is open face (but Attic Antique font). See screenshot below. Am I stuck, or is there something I can do to keep the gecko image glyph?

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 22, 2021 Aug 22, 2021

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The glyph you've used — U 0078 + 006F + 0072 + 006E + 0036 + 0078 — is a compound glyph that's not accepted by EPUB, HTML, Accessible PDF, or other final digital file formats that I know.  It's a custom, non-standard glyph that's made of up several single glyphs to create the character you see (a gecko (?) from your screen shot).

 

Standard Unicode glyphs (on OpenType fonts) are defined by only one set of 4 - 5 number/letters called a "codepoint." Your glyph has a group of 6 codepoints.

 

Examples of regular Unicode glyphs on most OpenType fonts:

0043 = C

0061 = a

0074 = t

2022 = • (bullet)

25B6 = ▶

 

FYI, the full chart of Unicode codepoints can be viewed here: https://www.unicode.org/charts/  Unicode has codepoints for every glyph in the world's languages, as well as symbols (dingbats, scientific/math symbols, and emojis). This system makes it possible for us to exchange text content across many different technologies, such as between Macs and PCs; EPUBS, HTML, and PDF; and translate between languages.

 

If you look carefully at the ASCII chart in Unicode, you'll see that the coodepoints in your screen capture — 0078 + 006F + 0072 + 006E + 0036 + 0078 — are the characters x o r n 6 x, which is what you are seeing in your EPUB.

 

Because your gecko isn't part of the standard codepoints, the only solution I have is to use it in Illustrator (or other vector-graphics program), and convert it to outlines (a graphic of vector paths) that you can bring into your InDesign layout. Put Alt-Text on the final graphic so that it exports from InDesign without any problems.

 

Musing: who in he!! at that font manufacturer thought it was a good idea to hijack standard alpha-numeric Unicode glyphs (so standard that they are characters on our keyboards) for their use as a custom graphic. Unicode has a way for font manufacturers to do this type of glyph in a private use area where they can make up anything they want as a glyph. Personally, I'd never buy a font from that manufacturer again. I'm wondering what else they f-ed up in their font.

 

Bevi Chagnon | Designer & Technologist for Accessible InDesign + PDFs |
Books & Classes | PubCom

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 22, 2021 Aug 22, 2021

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And if you'd like to learn more about Unicode for designers and authors, check out this blog post:

https://www.pubcom.com/blog/2013_12-03/unicode-accessibility.html

 

Bevi Chagnon | Designer & Technologist for Accessible InDesign + PDFs |
Books & Classes | PubCom

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 23, 2021 Aug 23, 2021

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Very nice. Thanks.

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 23, 2021 Aug 23, 2021

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Thank you. I'll give the Illustrator idea a try.  

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 23, 2021 Aug 23, 2021

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If you really need that glyph as an editable glyph in running text, you could consider making a custom font, I think. Take a look at IndyFont: Indiscripts :: IndyFont 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 23, 2021 Aug 23, 2021

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A custom font is possible, but again it might run into the problem with EPUB, which requires full accessibility...and correctly encoded Unicode/OpenType fonts with accessible names.

 

So you might be right back where you started; an incorrectly encoded glyph that doesn't pass the accessibility checkers.

 

One other thought: taking a glyph from one font and creating another font from it will probably violate the original font owner's copyright. Check the EULA on the original font of Geographica Hand.

Bevi Chagnon | Designer & Technologist for Accessible InDesign + PDFs |
Books & Classes | PubCom

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 24, 2021 Aug 24, 2021

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I was thinking a one-glyph font, and using a character style to apply it. Don't know if that would help or not.

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