InDesign JEPGS exporting at wrong pixel size

New Here ,
Aug 14, 2022 Aug 14, 2022

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Hi,


Im exporting InDesign graphics to be used on the web with very specific pixel sizes, but once exported they are much larger than desired size. I have tried lowering the PPI but loose way too much quality

 

i.e. my 160 x 600 px design is coming out as 667 x 2500

 

Any help would be great

Thanks

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Community Expert , Aug 14, 2022 Aug 14, 2022

In order to export a jpeg and maintain the 160 x 600 pixels you would have to use a resolution of 72 ppi (which is more or less the standard web resolution). Using a higher resolution will by necessity increase the pixels per inch of the jpeg from what you started with. That's just what higher resolution means as you're increasing the number of pixels per inch with the higher value. For web use 72 ppi is usually adequate but if you really need the higher number you could resample the jpeg in Pho

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Community Expert ,
Aug 14, 2022 Aug 14, 2022

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In order to export a jpeg and maintain the 160 x 600 pixels you would have to use a resolution of 72 ppi (which is more or less the standard web resolution). Using a higher resolution will by necessity increase the pixels per inch of the jpeg from what you started with. That's just what higher resolution means as you're increasing the number of pixels per inch with the higher value. For web use 72 ppi is usually adequate but if you really need the higher number you could resample the jpeg in Photoshop. For example, if you export the jpeg at 150 ppi from InDesign it would read in Phostoshop as 333 pixels x 1250 pixels. If you resample it down to the 160 x 600 (while leaving the resolution at 150 ppi) the 160 pixel dimension would appear onscreen at a little over 1 inch (150 pixels equals an inch). If you had exported the jpeg at 72 ppi the pixels would stay at 160 x 600 but the jpeg would now be viewed at almost two inches for the 160 dimension (2 inches would equal 154 pixels or 2 x 72). It all comes down to how you want to see the image onscreen.

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Community Expert ,
Aug 14, 2022 Aug 14, 2022

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"I have tried lowering the PPI but loose way too much quality"

That's all the quality that's possible within 160x600; It won't get any better than that.

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Community Expert ,
Aug 14, 2022 Aug 14, 2022

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Don't use pixel scaling in your ID layout. Use a proportional layout of about one inch per desired 100 pixel dimensions, and export at 100 dpi. That is, if you want a 160x600 result, use a 1.6 x 6 inch layout. Let ID and the export process take care of both the size and maintaining as much detail as possible, instead of using it like a paint program, working at a 1:1 pixel resolution.

 

Put another way, ID is not Photoshop. Use it at layout scales where it does things best, and then export to any resolution and pixel dimensions you need.

 

|| Word & InDesign to Kindle (& EPUB): a Professional Guide (Amazon)

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