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Licensed image looks different

New Here ,
Aug 13, 2021 Aug 13, 2021

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A licensed image I am trying to add to a document in InDesign from the Adobe Stock, looks different than what I can originally clicked on. It's darker and less define. What am I missing? 

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correct answers 1 Correct answer

Adobe Community Professional , Aug 16, 2021 Aug 16, 2021
Place the image on a page, and with it selected, check your LinkInfo panel. It will list the file format and the image’s embedded color profile: The watermarked sample downloads have no color profile assignment, so if the full res versions are the same, that would affect the color in InDesign—images with no profile embedded use the InDesign document’s assigned profile (Document RGB). The assigned document profile above is sRGB (Edit>Assign Profiles...). Here I’ve changed the assignment to P...

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 13, 2021 Aug 13, 2021

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What file format is the image? If it is a jpeg, png or any other raster format then it is resolution dependent. This means that if you enlarge it then it will indeed become less defined and may also begin to pixelate. As for the darkness is there a difference in the way the image looks whether it is viewed in Photoshop or when it is imported into an InDesign document? If so, then this could be a matter of the two programs not using the same Color Profile. This can be checked in both programs through Edit>Color Settings. If when you go there you find that the profiles are different then make an adjustment to one of the programs so that the profiles match. Also, if you have changed the image's color space from RGB to CMYK in Photoshop then the colors will indeed become duller.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 14, 2021 Aug 14, 2021

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I agree with Bill.

 

How does it look in Photoshop?

How does it look when you export a PDF?

Are you printing this yourself or a professional printer?

>If printing yourself - how does it print?

>If printing by a professional printers - can you send them that page in PDF format and ask for a printed sample?

 

Can you let us know what image it is you downloaded? 

Can you share any screenshots of what is happening?

 

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New Here ,
Aug 16, 2021 Aug 16, 2021

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It is a licensed image. I selected it from Adobe Stock, had it sent to my library and then put it into my project. I don't believe either of your questions relates, then, to my situation. It's not an image with a file format. It's between Adobe Stock and InDesign. Happy to hear any other thoughts. 

Thanks-

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 16, 2021 Aug 16, 2021

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@Kelsie5EE3 wrote:

 It's not an image with a file format.


 

Adobe Stock where the image was purchased. - Your image has a format - every image file has a file format. It can't not have one.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 16, 2021 Aug 16, 2021

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Place the image on a page, and with it selected, check your LinkInfo panel. It will list the file format and the image’s embedded color profile:

 

Screen Shot 17.png

 

The watermarked sample downloads have no color profile assignment, so if the full res versions are the same, that would affect the color in InDesign—images with no profile embedded use the InDesign document’s assigned profile (Document RGB). The assigned document profile above is sRGB (Edit>Assign Profiles...). Here I’ve changed the assignment to ProPhoto RGB and you can see the color appearance changes:

 

Screen Shot 18.png

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